For this assignment, you are to read current news articles about Latin America from the

For this assignment, you are to read current news articles about Latin America from the website for the North American Congress of Latin America (NACLA) and submit three short reviews during the semester. Please submit one review per due date. Each review is to be at least 3-4 pages and each due date corresponds to a regional topic in Latin America. The due dates for these reports are June 25 and July 9. Here are the regional topics corresponding to each due date:
June 25: Mexico, the Caribbean(Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, etc.), and Central America (Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panama, Nicaragua, and Belize).

July 9: South America (Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Peru, Uruguay, Ecuador, Colombia, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Venezuela)

Please submit your reports through Canvas in either of the following formats: doc, docx or PDF (if you are using Apple Pages to compose your review, please be sure to convert your paper to docx or PDF before submitting it). Late papers will be accepted for each submission, but only for one week after the assigned due dates and will be assessed a full grade deduction. Please use both a title page and a works cited page (neither of these pages count toward your 3-4 pages of text). These 2 reports will count as a combined 35% toward your final grade. In your works cited page, compose your article entry in a format like this:
Hilary Goodfriend, “El Bukelazo: Shades of Dictatorship in El Salvador,” NACLA Report on the Americas website (February 19, 2020).
In terms of the content of each report, I am looking for two main points of discussion. First, you should devote the first half of the report to a summary of the main points in the article that you selected. To help you to address this issue, consider some of these questions: What is the main issue being discussed? (i.e. immigration, elections, education, environment, women’s issues, crime, etc.) Who are the main personalities mentioned in the article? (i.e. El Salvador President Nayib Bukele, Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, President Biden, Vice-President Harris, etc.) How does the issue affect the people of the country mentioned in the article? Does the issue have any connection with United States interests? What do you think could be the best solution to resolve this problem?
And for the second point of discussion, please analyze the article that you selected and present your point of view on the story. For example, how do you feel about the story? How did this article contribute to your understanding about modern Latin America? And what do you think about the author’s perspective on the article? How does this topic relate to contemporary political, economic or cultural themes in the United States today?
Here is a list of articles from the NACLA website pertaining to regions for the June 25 due date. Everybody, just pick any one article from this list for your June 25 review. You will repeat the same process for your July 9 review on a South American nation. These articles range in date from February 2019 to June 2021 For this list, I’m going in alphabetical order by the name of the nation, but I’ll start with Mexico first (note: more recent articles, since October 2020, are indicated in parenthesis):
Mexico:
23 Years of Impunity for Perpetrators of Acteal Massacre (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

A Labor Spring for Mexico’s Maquilas? (Links to an external site.)

A License to Pollute at Fortuna Silver Mines in Oaxaca (March 2021) (Links to an external site.)

“A Project for Life” in Mexico City (Links to an external site.)

As Mexican Pork Industry Expands, Environmental Concerns Follow (Links to an external site.)

AMLO Pushes Ahead on Militarized Megaprojects (Links to an external site.)

AMLO’s Crumbling Promise to Migrants (Links to an external site.)

Blurring the Division Between Church and State in AMLO’s Mexico (Links to an external site.)

El Chapo and Mexico’s Drug War Spectacle (Links to an external site.)

Euphemisms of Violence: Child Migrants and the Mexican State (Dec. 2020)

For Mexico City Housing Movement, Metro Collapse is the Latest Symptom of Structural Inequity (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

For Mexico’s Striking University Workers, A War of Attrition Over Public Education (Links to an external site.)

“Green Tide” Reaches Mexico as Oaxaca Decriminalizes Abortion (Links to an external site.)

Health and Economic Crisis in Mexico Hits Informal Sector Workers (March 2021) (Links to an external site.)

In Mexico, the Threats and Failures of Pre-Trial Detention (Links to an external site.)

Indigenous Communities in Mexico Take up Arms to Defend the Monarch Forest (March 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Julián Leyzaola’s Dangerous Plans for Tijuana (Links to an external site.)

López Obrador’s Public Enemy Number One (Links to an external site.)

Machista Media Get it Wrong on Feminist Protests in Mexico (Interview) (Links to an external site.)

Maquiladoras and the Exploitation of Migrants on the Border (Links to an external site.)

Mexican Police Who Massacred Guatemalan Migrants Get Their Guns from the U.S. (April 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Mexican Women Call on Government to End Violence (Links to an external site.)

Mexico Bans Glysophate But Tolerates Other Agrochemicals (Jan. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Mexico’s Fracking Impasse (Oct. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Mining Culture Wars Escalate in Oaxaca (Links to an external site.)

Narcos Mexico Is Not the Education We Need (Television Review) (Links to an external site.)

On the Coast of Oaxaca, Afro and Indigenous Tribes Fight for Water Autonomy (Links to an external site.)

Pandemic Intensifies Women’s Struggle for Water in Oaxaca, Mexico (Links to an external site.)

Power and Spectacle on Mexico’s Southern Border (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Revisiting the Battle of Culiacán (Links to an external site.)

The Legacy of Samir Flores, One Year Later (Links to an external site.)

The Rebirth of Mexico’s Electrical Workers (Links to an external site.)

The Search for Answers in Mexico (Links to an external site.)

Today We Protest, Tomorrow We Strike (Links to an external site.)

Translating the Fourth Transformation (Interview) (Links to an external site.)

Twenty-First Century Battlefields (Book Excerpt)

Barbados:
Caribbean Food Sovereignty During Covid-19 (Links to an external site.)

Barbuda:
After Irma, Disaster Capitalism Threatens Cultural Heritage in Barbuda(Links to an external site.)

Belize:
In Belize, a Win for Black Dockworkers (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Maya Communities Respond to Land Predation and FPIC Violation in Belize (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Costa Rica:
Costa Rica’s Covid-19 Response Scapegoats Nicaraguan Migrants (Links to an external site.)

Cuba:
A Ship Adrift: Cuba After the Pink Tide (Links to an external site.)

Artists in Cuba Spearhead First Major Protest in Decades (Dec. 2020)

Cuban Memory Wars (Book Review)(May 2021) (Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

Mi Primera Tarea (Film Review) (Links to an external site.)

On Sovereignties and Solidarities (Links to an external site.)

Religious Conservatism is Shaping the Civil Liberties Debate in Cuba (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

The Right to Live in Health and Cuban Health Care: The Ongoing Revolution (Book Review) (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

The War on Cuba Documentary Tells the Story of the U.S. Embargo (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Why Trump’s Cuba Policy is So Wrong (Links to an external site.)

Dominican Republic:
Checkpoint Nation

“I Am the Darker Brother”: Michèle Stephenson’s “Stateless” Documentary (April 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Post-Electoral Crisis in the Dominican Republic (Interview) (Links to an external site.)

The Right’s Continued Dominance in the Dominican Republic (Links to an external site.)

El Salvador:
100 Days of Nayib Bukele in El Salvador: Social Movement Perspectives (Interview) (Links to an external site.)

Alejandro Molina Lara Fought for Workers’ Rights in El Salvador and the United States (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Building a Church of the Poor (Dec. 2020)

Bukele Responds to Avalanche of International Criticism: “The People Voted for This” (May 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

Confronting Internal Forced Displacement in El Salvador (Links to an external site.)

Death by Deportation, With Help From the Human Rights Establishment (Links to an external site.)

Deportation Contagions (Links to an external site.)

El Bukelazo: Shades of Dictatorship in El Salvador (Links to an external site.)

El Salvador’s Backslide (Links to an external site.)

El Salvador President Nayib Bukele Has Blood on His Hands (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Poets and Prophets of Resistance: Intellectuals and the Origins of El Salvador’s Civil War (Book Review) (Links to an external site.)

The Hollywood Kid: The Violent Life and Violent Death of an MS-13 Hitman (Book Review) (Links to an external site.)

Underreported and Unpunished, Femicides in El Salvador Continue (March 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemala:
A Dispatch From the Caravan (Links to an external site.)

A Victory for Guatemala’s Pacto de Corruptos (Links to an external site.)

Defending Consultation: Indigenous Resistance Against the Escobal Mine in Guatemala (Links to an external site.)

Democracy in Crisis in Guatemala (Links to an external site.)

Dianna Ortiz, Survivor and Witness of the Guatemalan Genocide (1958-2021) (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemala: Impunity for War Criminals, Again (Links to an external site.)

Guatemalan Child Refugees, Then and Now (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Guatemalans Have Had Enough (Nov. 2020)

Historical Memory in the Digital Age (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

“History Moves Forward. You Cannot Go Back:” An Interview with Judge Yassmín Barrios (Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Finding a Voice in Indigenous Community Radio (Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Out with the Old, In with the Older (Links to an external site.)

In Guatemala, Resignations are Not Enough (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Indigenous Guatemalan Journalist Faces Charges after Reporting on Protest (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Is Guatemala a “Safe Third Country” for Disposable People? (Links to an external site.)

Officials Conceal Conditions at Guatemala Mental Health Hospital During Pandemic (Links to an external site.)

Remembering Guatemala’s Martyr of Justice: An Interview with Francisco Goldman (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Sex Workers Unionize in Guatemala (Links to an external site.)

Talking Like a Mining Company: The Escobal Mine in Guatemala (Links to an external site.)

U.S. Archeologist Seeks to Privatize Maya Historic Sites in the Name of Conservation

U.S. Policy Toward Central America Continues Legacy of Displacement (April 2021) (Links to an external site.)

“We Are Here by Force”: Maya Ixil Activists Fight for Asylum and Justice (May 2021) (Links to an external site.)
(Links to an external site.)

White Flags as Guatemalans Grow Hungry (Links to an external site.)

Haiti:
A Young Duvalier and Haiti’s Unremembered Past (Links to an external site.)

Behind the Covid Numbers in Haiti (Links to an external site.)

Building Corruption in Haiti

Fighting for Survival, Building for Power (April 2021) (Links to an external site.)

(Links to an external site.)

Haiti at the Crossroads (Links to an external site.)

Shooting at Haitian Parliament Surprises Few as Anti-Government Protests Continue (Links to an external site.)

The Foreign Roots of Haiti’s “Constitutional Crisis” (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

The Political Anatomy of Haiti’s Armed Gangs (Apr. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Trapped in the Imperial Grip (Apr. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Honduras:
A Private Government in Honduras Moves Forward (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

A State of Mistrust (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Climate Change Haunts a Ghostly Border in Honduras (Nov. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

For Murdered Honduran Organizer Berta Cáceres, “Any Injustice Was Her Battle” (Links to an external site.)

Garífuna Community Demands Return of Kidnapped Leaders (Links to an external site.)

Honduras a Decade after the Coup: An Interview with Luis Méndez (Links to an external site.)

On Honduras (Links to an external site.)

Political Prisoners Released as Government’s Legitimacy Crumbles in Honduras (Interview) (Links to an external site.)

The Flame of Opposition in Honduras (Links to an external site.)

The Roots of the National Strike in Honduras: An Interview with Bayron Rodríguez Pineda (Links to an external site.)

The Stain that Mardi Gras Covers Up: Worker Vulnerability in New Orleans (Links to an external site.)

U.S. Violence Prevention in Honduras: Help or Hypocrisy? (Links to an external site.)

Who Killed Berta Cáceres (Book Review) (Links to an external site.)

Jamaica:
Rethinking Sargassum Seaweed: Could It Be the New Normal in Jamaica? (Links to an external site.)

Nicaragua:
Deciphering Nicaragua’s Tepid Covid Response (Links to an external site.)

The Anti-Sandinista Youth of Nicaragua (Links to an external site.)

The Sandinista Labor Paradox (Links to an external site.)

The Youth Leading Nicaragua’s Uprising, One Year Later (Links to an external site.)

Panama:
After Landmark Territorial Win, Naso People of Panama Look to the Future (Feb. 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico:
A Disastrous Methane Gas Scheme Threatens Puerto Rico’s Energy Future (Links to an external site.)

Adjunct Faculty in an Adjunct Country (Links to an external site.)

Doing Reggaetón However He Wants: Bad Bunny’s YHLQMDLG (Music Review) (Links to an external site.)

Mutual Aid and Survival as Resistance in Puerto Rico (Links to an external site.)

Policing is the Crisis (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rican People’s Assemblies Shift from Protest to Proposal (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico’s Seismic Shocks (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico 2021: A Shift in Perspective, A New Opposition (Dec. 2020) (Links to an external site.)

Puerto Rico and the Perpetual State of Emergency (Links to an external site.)

Step by Powerful Step, Citizens Lead Puerto Rico into Its Solar Future (Links to an external site.)

The Anti-Corruption Code for the New Puerto Rico (Links to an external site.)

The Protests in Puerto Rico Are About Life and Death (Links to an external site.)

The Summer 2019 Uprising: Building a New Puerto Rico

To My Fellow BoriBlancos: When We Say “Down with White Power,” We Also Mean Our White Power

Where is the State of Emergency? (June 2021) (Links to an external site.)

Trinidad and Tobago:
Toppling the Colonizers in Trinidad and Tobago (June 2021) (Links to an external site.

Requirements: 1

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Liliana CarbajoIn consequentialism it sees

We need 2 replies for these posts. 50 WORDS EACH
Liliana CarbajoIn consequentialism it sees if an action is right or wrong only based on consequences that result from that action. For example killing a shooter to save 100s of others, this in consequentialism is the right action. Non-consequentialism doesn’t judge the consequences to decide if an action is right or wrong rather it evaluates the action itself regardless of its consequences. For example killing that one shooter is not an option even if it would save many people’s lives because killing is not morally good.
Manage Discussion EntIn consequentialism it sees if an action is right or wrong only based on consequences that result from that action. For example killing a shooter to save 100s of others, this in consequentialism is the right action. Non-consequentialism doesn’t judge the consequences to decide if an action is right or wrong rather it evaluates the action itself regardless of its consequences. For example killing that one shooter is not an option even if it would save many people’s lives because killing is not morally good.One of the major theories associated with consequentialism is Utilitarianism. This theory basically says that the right action is the one that produces the best consequences for the largest number of people. One objection that can be made to this theory is that it does not focus on personal integrity or moral act.
One of the major theories associated with consequentialism is Utilitarianism. This theory basically says that the right action is the one that produces the best consequences for the largest number of people. One objection that can be made to this theory is that it does not focus on personal integrity or moral act.
One of the major theories associated with non-consequentialism is Kantian Ethics. This theory focuses on the duty to do what is morally right. A right action comes from the use of reasoning for goodwill. One of the objections that can be made to this theory is that it can be impractical to treat each person as he/she has infinite value. One can argue why would it be ok to spent thousands of dollars in one patient and leave a small amount of budget for the following patients.
Ani SarkisiansTo be completely honest it was nice to learn about the different branches of ethics and their theories, because I have never really delved deeper into ethics aside from the basics.
To put it simply, it appears to me that consequentialist theories relate mainly to the idea of just doing good and acting in good faith, for mainly oneself but also allowing the same practice for others. Those theories working towards this general idea of going for the best possible outcome primarily for oneself, are the following: utilitarianism, hedonism, and moral egoism. While on the other hand, non-consequentialist theories focus more on the type of person you are at the core fundamentally. For example, your actions, way of thinking, overall character, morals, ethical code, and in general, way of direction in life. These theories: virtue ethics, deontology, and natural law theory, define the principles of living ethically.
So, the main difference between the two theories, is that consequentialist theories focus on doing the best for yourself, or what may feel like the good choice for the best outcome, while non-consequentialist theories focus more deeply on who you are as a person from an ethical standpoint overall and living life with certain key principles and morals in mind. To narrow it down even more, consequentialist theories relate to what occurs to oneself and, or others when a decision is made and non-consequentialist theories focus on whether the decision was made on the right principles whether for oneself or all parties involved, regardless of the outcome.
Moral egoism relates to the belief that every individual act for themselves in mind, and for their best outcome. Objections that may be made to this theory lie in the idea that while moral egoists act to their own benefit, what does that mean on an ethical standpoint to others and their interests? If everyone must act for their own best interests, eventually individuals will come into conflict with what their “best interest” is and how it affects one another. There can easily be conflict between two people’s self-interests colliding and there would be no way of making resolutions since the core of their actions is only for themselves and none other.
Natural law theory relates to the idea that there are common universal moral laws based on the understanding of human nature that one should follow. Some say that the moral law is written by God or derived from the character of God. The set of laws are considered objective and focus on reflecting upon oneself and one’s own intrinsic thoughts. I can think of so many objections that can be made to the natural law theory mainly because of its foundations and where we are in society today. For example, the simplest objection to this theory is that what feels morally correct for someone based on their own self-reflection, would be considered morally incorrect if it goes against God’s commands.
I hope my understanding of the theories is correct, please let me know your thoughts.

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