Help me to answer the question

Here are 3 readings, you can read and help me answer the question in folder I attached.
1. Indigenous AmericaTo the people who had lived in the Americas for millennia, the idea that theirs was a “New World” would have seemed strange. Scientists continue to debate when the first people arrived in the Americas from Asia, but estimates range from between 40,000 and 14,000 years ago. In the millennia that followed, the peoples of the Americas fanned out and established a range of societies.
Yet to the Europeans who arrived in the Americas toward the end of the fifteenth century, America was indeed a “brave new world,” as William Shakespeare wrote, inhabited by exotic plants, animals, and peoples. In images and words, Europeans portrayed this extraordinary land in the most fantastic terms. Some accounts spoke of America as an Eden-like earthly paradise inhabited by good-natured, but primitive, peoples. Others emphasized themes like those featured in the below engraving, Amerigo Vespucci Awakens a Sleeping America.

Vespucci, an Italian-Spanish navigator from whose first name the New World came to be called the Americas, gazes upon a naked native woman rising from her hammock. Her nudity symbolizes the wild sexuality Europeans believed characterized the native inhabitants of the Americas. The cannibals behind her, devouring human flesh, represent savagery, a second prominent element of the European vision of the New World. Neither vision of the Americas was accurate, but both would greatly complicate Europeans’ understanding of the American civilizations they encountered, leading to a legacy of violence, exploitation, and conquest.
The European arrival in the Americas was part of a process of exploration and colonization pursued primarily by Portugal, Spain, France, and England. This impulse was driven both by a hunger for riches as well as by profound changes in European society, religion, economics, and politics brought on by the Renaissance and Reformation. Africa was eventually drawn into this vast trading network encompassing the entire Atlantic world. Colonization almost always involved the severe exploitation of native peoples, including dispossession of land and coerced labor. Eventually, Europeans turned to the international slave trade and the labor of enslaved Africans to draw wealth from the mines and fields of the New World.
2. Colliding CulturesSpain’s opening ventures in the Americas had been wildly successful, making the Iberian kingdom the envy of the world. Hoping to cash in on the bounty, other European nations challenged Spain’s monopoly on American colonization, creating an outward explosion. Although slow to consolidate an imperial presence in North America, England was the first to confront the Spanish in force, wounding them severely. France and the Netherlands took advantage of the situation and also began building their own American empires.
For Native Americans, the entry of Europeans into their realms combined with other forces created an air of crisis. Presented with a series of new challenges, Indians sought new ways to solve their problems and created altogether new societies. This often involved difficult choices: perhaps allying with the newcomers, resisting them, or fleeing. As different groups exercised different options, the outcome was a historically dynamic world of interaction involving all of the societies that were coming together in North America.
This dynamic interaction yielded interesting fruit. In New Spain, New France, New Netherlands, and New England, truly cosmopolitan societies emerged. Bearing cultural traits and material goods from throughout the world, these new transatlantic societies set the tone for future development in North America.
3. British North AmericaIn 1607, the English created their first permanent colony at Jamestown. By 1732, thirteen English colonies hugged the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Some, like Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts, were founded as religious refugees; others were founded for profit. Three distinct regions soon emerged, based primarily on how the settlers made their living.
Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia made up the Southern colonial region, Here tobacco shaped every aspect of life. Thousands of poor young Englishmen were brought over to work in the tobacco fields. They came as indentured servants, working without pay in exchange for passage to America. Few women were recruited, and the combination of an unbalanced sex ratio and frequent deaths caused by an unhealthy climate, grueling labor, and poor diet led the southern colonies to use African slave labor, which resulted in the plantation owners becoming the richest group in British North America.
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and later New Hampshire made up the New England colonies, with their small farms and shipping and lumbering industries. Here the earliest dissenters sought religious freedom and by 1630, they demanded conformity to their Puritan religious views and drove out those who challenged them, especially Quakers. In 1691, Massachusetts was taken over by the King, and the Puritans’ religious experiment ended. The anxiety produced by this political change coupled with economic tensions and Indian attacks on the frontier all contributed to the Salem witch hunts of 1691.
The Middle colonial region was originally settled by the Dutch and the Swedes, but the English seized the area in 1664. New Sweden and New Netherlands became New Jersey and New York. In 1681 William Penn created the colony of Pennsylvania, west of New Jersey, as a home for Quakers. Unlike the Puritans of New England, however, he welcomed people of all faiths into his “holy experiment.” The Middle Colonies were noted for their diverse populations and policies of religious tolerance.

Help me To Answer the question

Here are 3 readings, you can read and help me answer the question in folder I attached.
1. Indigenous AmericaTo the people who had lived in the Americas for millennia, the idea that theirs was a “New World” would have seemed strange. Scientists continue to debate when the first people arrived in the Americas from Asia, but estimates range from between 40,000 and 14,000 years ago. In the millennia that followed, the peoples of the Americas fanned out and established a range of societies.
Yet to the Europeans who arrived in the Americas toward the end of the fifteenth century, America was indeed a “brave new world,” as William Shakespeare wrote, inhabited by exotic plants, animals, and peoples. In images and words, Europeans portrayed this extraordinary land in the most fantastic terms. Some accounts spoke of America as an Eden-like earthly paradise inhabited by good-natured, but primitive, peoples. Others emphasized themes like those featured in the below engraving, Amerigo Vespucci Awakens a Sleeping America.

Vespucci, an Italian-Spanish navigator from whose first name the New World came to be called the Americas, gazes upon a naked native woman rising from her hammock. Her nudity symbolizes the wild sexuality Europeans believed characterized the native inhabitants of the Americas. The cannibals behind her, devouring human flesh, represent savagery, a second prominent element of the European vision of the New World. Neither vision of the Americas was accurate, but both would greatly complicate Europeans’ understanding of the American civilizations they encountered, leading to a legacy of violence, exploitation, and conquest.
The European arrival in the Americas was part of a process of exploration and colonization pursued primarily by Portugal, Spain, France, and England. This impulse was driven both by a hunger for riches as well as by profound changes in European society, religion, economics, and politics brought on by the Renaissance and Reformation. Africa was eventually drawn into this vast trading network encompassing the entire Atlantic world. Colonization almost always involved the severe exploitation of native peoples, including dispossession of land and coerced labor. Eventually, Europeans turned to the international slave trade and the labor of enslaved Africans to draw wealth from the mines and fields of the New World.
2. Colliding CulturesSpain’s opening ventures in the Americas had been wildly successful, making the Iberian kingdom the envy of the world. Hoping to cash in on the bounty, other European nations challenged Spain’s monopoly on American colonization, creating an outward explosion. Although slow to consolidate an imperial presence in North America, England was the first to confront the Spanish in force, wounding them severely. France and the Netherlands took advantage of the situation and also began building their own American empires.
For Native Americans, the entry of Europeans into their realms combined with other forces created an air of crisis. Presented with a series of new challenges, Indians sought new ways to solve their problems and created altogether new societies. This often involved difficult choices: perhaps allying with the newcomers, resisting them, or fleeing. As different groups exercised different options, the outcome was a historically dynamic world of interaction involving all of the societies that were coming together in North America.
This dynamic interaction yielded interesting fruit. In New Spain, New France, New Netherlands, and New England, truly cosmopolitan societies emerged. Bearing cultural traits and material goods from throughout the world, these new transatlantic societies set the tone for future development in North America.
3. British North AmericaIn 1607, the English created their first permanent colony at Jamestown. By 1732, thirteen English colonies hugged the coast of the Atlantic Ocean. Some, like Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Massachusetts, were founded as religious refugees; others were founded for profit. Three distinct regions soon emerged, based primarily on how the settlers made their living.
Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia made up the Southern colonial region, Here tobacco shaped every aspect of life. Thousands of poor young Englishmen were brought over to work in the tobacco fields. They came as indentured servants, working without pay in exchange for passage to America. Few women were recruited, and the combination of an unbalanced sex ratio and frequent deaths caused by an unhealthy climate, grueling labor, and poor diet led the southern colonies to use African slave labor, which resulted in the plantation owners becoming the richest group in British North America.
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and later New Hampshire made up the New England colonies, with their small farms and shipping and lumbering industries. Here the earliest dissenters sought religious freedom and by 1630, they demanded conformity to their Puritan religious views and drove out those who challenged them, especially Quakers. In 1691, Massachusetts was taken over by the King, and the Puritans’ religious experiment ended. The anxiety produced by this political change coupled with economic tensions and Indian attacks on the frontier all contributed to the Salem witch hunts of 1691.
The Middle colonial region was originally settled by the Dutch and the Swedes, but the English seized the area in 1664. New Sweden and New Netherlands became New Jersey and New York. In 1681 William Penn created the colony of Pennsylvania, west of New Jersey, as a home for Quakers. Unlike the Puritans of New England, however, he welcomed people of all faiths into his “holy experiment.” The Middle Colonies were noted for their diverse populations and policies of religious tolerance.

History of War

Based on your reading and the lectures, answer the two questions below. Each answer should be roughly 500 words in length.
The three principal wartime leaders–FDR, Churchill, and DeGaulle–had differing attitudes about preserving France’s empire in Asia. How did those attitudes evolve as World War II unfolded?
How did events at the end of World War II create a “revolutionary moment” for the Viet Minh?

History Question

China, Europe, and the Age of ExplorationPurposeDuring the Middle Ages, China and India were the wealthiest and most populous countries on earth. Products such as silk, spices, and porcelain were traded from China and India to Europe overland along a series of trade routes called the Silk Roads. However, with rare exceptions such as Marco Polo, who traveled to the court of Kublai Khan in China, Europeans had little direct contact with either China or India. In the fifteenth century, Europeans began to send out voyages of exploration in search of quicker, less costly ocean routes to Asia. Arguably, Christopher Columbus was the most famous of these explorers. Columbus, who sailed west from Spain across the Atlantic Ocean in 1492 aspired to find a new sea route to Asia. Inadvertently, he discovered the Americas in the process. He even died in 1506 under the impression that he had reached Asia. This essay will require you to reflect on the importance of Asia in the fifteenth century, including how it shaped the expectations and behavior of Europeans such as Christopher Columbus.
Questions to Address for this EssayUsing the essay instructions included below and the allowed sources, this essay should address all of the following interrelated questions:
What were the main reasons Europeans sought new trade routes to Asia, particularly to China and India?
Give reasons for your answers. In addition, what positive features did Marco Polo describe about Yuan (Mongol) China?
While Europeans were interested in Yuan (Mongol) and Ming China, why on the other hand did China pull back from exploration under the Ming dynasty?
From his letter, where did Columbus believe that his voyage of exploration had arrived?
In what ways did Marco Polo’s account of China appear to influence what Christopher Columbus expected to find during his voyage of exploration?
How did Christopher Columbus describe the New World and the Native peoples he encountered?
How did Columbus’ description of the New World ultimately differ from Marco Polo’s description of China?
Essay InstructionsEssays should be generally free of spelling, grammatical, and stylistic errors. They should use complete sentences and paragraphs. A paragraph is comprised of 4-6 sentences. Essays should have an introductory paragraph with a thesis statement that provides the essay’s argument, the main body of several supporting paragraphs that address the questions, and a conclusion that wraps up the essay and refers again to the thesis statement. Essays should be indented at the beginning of each paragraph.
Essays should be typed in 12-point font with a simple, clean font such as Times New Roman. Use 1” inch margins on all sides and double-space the text.
Excluding citations, essays should be a minimum of 1,000 words. or four pages in length. Essays should run no more than a maximum of 1,250 words, or five pages in length.
Essays should provide specific examples and use evidence in answering the questions. This includes citing sources, either with direct quotes or summarized information. As a general rule of thumb, essays should have at least one citation per paragraph. Essays should avoid lengthy or block quotations.
Students should take care to avoid plagiarism. As part of this, and in order to simplify this assignment for students, the use of outside sources is forbidden for this essay. Students should only cite the sources assigned to them in GoView for this essay.
Essays should not use the first person, e.g. I, me, or my.
Source citations should use a commonly accepted citation style such as MLA or Chicago. You should choose one of these citation styles from the outset and use it consistently throughout your essay. For more information on accepted citation styles, please see the General Essay Guideline on the syllabus.

American Indian Studies 440

2) After using the Native Lands Mapping Resource, please discuss why might it be important to begin our course by learning about who is indigenous to the land in which our own campus sits? Also, upon whose indigenous homelands is your hometown located? Did you know this information previously? Please share your thoughts/reactions to this information (or lack of!)
3) Lastly, please discuss your reactions to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s TED Talk. What points from her talk stood out to you? Based on our course introduction, why do you think we’re beginning our American Indian Studies course with this video? Or, in other words, how do you think this talk might relate to our course or serve as a lens through which we can approach the subject matter?
Please make sure that your initial blog post reaches the 400 word minimum requirement and answers all parts of the prompt. Also, don’t forget to respond to at least 1 peer’s post. Your peer response post must reach the 200 word minimum requirement.

Article reflection

2.13 – Are YOU Civilized? DirectionsRead the article by Brown and reflect on the course material’s discussion of “civilized” and civilization. Why is this such a hard term to define? What are the implications of “civilized?”
Link to the article: Cynthia Brown: What is a civilization anyway? (Links to an external site.)
This is a “post-first” forum: you must contribute to the forum in order to see your classmates’ responses. Use the “reply” button to post your response.
For your Initial Post due by THURSDAY at 11:59 PM:
Hit the reply button, below.
Write a 300 word response and reflection on the article – DUE THURSDAY

Assignment 10

Please go to the following Web page and read about Susie Taylor.  https://www.battlefields.org/learn/biographies/susie-taylor 

 Now, watch this video about Susie Taylor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAMwdMS3dx0 

 Explain why you believe I chose this individual as the last homework assignment for this course.  In other words, why do I believe she is so important? 

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HIS-100-Q3752 Perspectives in History 22EW3

OverviewThe study of history is guided by asking questions. Developing research questions is an iterative process, which means that the questions are continuously changing as new information is uncovered and new thoughts occur. In this activity, you will consider how historical perspectives and sources influence how research questions are written and revised.
PromptUse the Module Three Activity Revising Questions Template to complete this activity. First, use your primary and secondary sources to help you choose a historical perspective (social, political, or economic) to apply to your topic. Then consider the evidence you have found in those sources and if that evidence supports your research questions or suggests you need to go in another direction. Finally, you will choose one research question to focus on and revise it. Revising may involve rewriting your research question completely. Or you may need to narrow your focus or improve the clarity of the question.
ExampleYou initially wanted to research how Native American people and culture have been memorialized in the United States. After consulting sources, you realize that this question is too broad. So, you decide to narrow your question to the movement to change Columbus Day to Indigenous Peoples’ Day. After further research, you decide to approach your topic from a cultural perspective rather than a political perspective. You choose this perspective because you are interested in how Indigenous Peoples’ Day might better preserve and recognize the many Native American cultures (the cultural perspective) rather than how governments have responded to this proposed change (the political perspective).
Specifically, you must address the following rubric criteria:
Identify a historical perspective that could be applied to your historical event.Ensure that you use evidence, such as examples or quotes, from your sources to support why you identified a particular perspective.

Revise your research question based on evidence from your primary and secondary sources.Does the evidence from your primary and secondary sources support your research question, or do they indicate you need to reconsider it? For example, you may need to narrow your focus further or approach your topic from a different perspective. If you do not feel like your research question needs to be changed, explain why.

Explain how historical perspective and evidence from sources influenced your finalized research question.How did they strengthen or challenge your research question?

Guidelines for SubmissionSubmit the Module Three Activity Template: Revising Questions. Sources should be cited according to APA style. While references are not required, any sources used should be cited according to APA style if you reference them in your responses. Consult the Shapiro Library APA Style Guide for more information on citations.

unit 1 discussion world history

Instruction:
In an initial post of about 200 words 6-7 sentences, address the following issues:
Describe how one or more of the sources linked below challenges the classic view of the Neolithic Revolution. In your post, be sure to talk about evidence, methodologies, or the logic that the linked sources use to support their conclusions about the Neolithic Revolution. To what extent have the linked articles made you reassess the classic view of the Neolithic Revolution? Explain.
JC Berbesque et al., “Hunter-gathers have less famine that agriculturalists” (2014)
Jared Diamond, “The Worst Mistake in the History of the Human Race” (1987)https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/the-worst-mistake-in-the-history-of-the-human-race
Vicki Cummings, “Hunting and Gathering in a Farmers’ World” (2014) http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199551224.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199551224-e-013

For this discussion, imagine that you are a Spanish missionary who willingly took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience

For this discussion, imagine that you are a Spanish missionary who willingly took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience to serve God and spread the Gospel. You left your home and country . . . and gave up the opportunity for riches, sex, a family, and even the freedom to make your own choices. You spent years studying Native American languages and teaching methods. Identify at least one major disappointment regarding your service and at least one joy. Minimum of 150 words

HIS1102 WEEK 2 Enlightment

Discussion Questions:
1. What core idea and attitudes most clearly connects Enlightenment thinkers as revealed in these sources? How do these ideas relate to 18th Century society and institutions?
2. What policies would an 18th Century ruler have to pursue to fit to the greatest degree the ideas and assumptions of Enlightenment thinkers? What hindrances were faced by monarchs who wanted to be more enlightened?
3. What ideas and attitudes of Enlightenment thinkers do you think remain valid for the problems facing today’s world? What Enlightenment ideas and attitudes no longer seem valid or appropriate? Explain.

HIS1102 WEEK 2 Enlightment

Discussion Questions:
1. What core idea and attitudes most clearly connects Enlightenment thinkers as revealed in these sources? How do these ideas relate to 18th Century society and institutions?
2. What policies would an 18th Century ruler have to pursue to fit to the greatest degree the ideas and assumptions of Enlightenment thinkers? What hindrances were faced by monarchs who wanted to be more enlightened?
3. What ideas and attitudes of Enlightenment thinkers do you think remain valid for the problems facing today’s world? What Enlightenment ideas and attitudes no longer seem valid or appropriate? Explain.

Required Resources No specific resources are required for this activity. Conduct general research and/or skim the textbook to help

Required Resources
No specific resources are required for this activity. Conduct general research and/or skim the textbook to help you select a topic.

Introduction
You will work on a research project for the duration of this course that you will deliver as a presentation in Week 8. For this project, select a person whom you believe had significant influence (positive or negative) on a movement for social, economic, and/or political change in the 20th and 21st centuries. Explore and address the following in your project:

Summarize the person’s ideas.
How did the ideas or changes affect the establishment and status quo?
What was the context in which this person proposed ideas/change?
How did the government or the people respond to the ideas/change?
What sort of following or support did he/she have?
How have the ideas/actions of the person influenced contemporary cultures and ideas?
For the final presentation, make sure to go beyond the surface information and go into depth about the person you are researching.

Here is a brief breakdown of the project so that you can plan your time in the course:

Week
Task
Week 3

Topic Selection

Week 5

Annotated Bibliography

Week 6

Script

Week 8

Presentation

Instructions
For the assignment this week, address the following:

State the topic.
For the stated issue, identify at least three (3) aspects of the issue that you think you will likely develop in your presentation. Briefly state why you have chosen each aspect.
You are not confined to three aspects only, but you must develop at least three. As you develop your presentation, you may find other aspects that you deem more relevant, and you may add or substitute those.

Writing Requirements (APA format)

Length: 1-2 paragraphs
1-inch margins
Double spaced
12-point Times New Roman font
Title page
References page (as needed)
Grading
This activity will be graded using the W3 Course Project Grading Rubric.

Course Outcomes (CO): 2, 3, 5, 8

Due Date: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Sunday

Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity: Textbook: Chapter 4, 5 Lesson Minimum of 2 scholarly sources

Required Resources
Read/review the following resources for this activity:

Textbook: Chapter 4, 5
Lesson
Minimum of 2 scholarly sources (in addition to the textbook)
Instructions
For this assignment, select one of the following options.

Option 1: Chronicle Adolf Hitler’s rise from failed art student to political speaker to eventually gain control over Germany.
Option 2: Describe Benito Mussolini’s revival of European Imperialism in North Africa and how he came to be Adolf Hitler’s ally.
Option 3: Chronicle the rise of extreme militarism in Japan and how it led them to conquer huge chunks of land in Asia and so many islands in the western Pacific basin, and how this led to their conflict with Great Britain and the United States
Option 4: Describe Joseph Stalin’s rise to total power in the USSR and how his paranoia and desire for total control led to the terrible purges of the 1930s.
Writing Requirements (APA format)

Length: 2-3 pages (not including title page or references page)
1-inch margins
Double spaced
12-point Times New Roman font
Title page
References page
Grading
This activity will be graded using the W3 Case Study Grading Rubric.

Course Outcomes (CO): 2, 3

Due Date: By 11:59 p.m. MT on Sunday

Required Resources Read/review the following resources for this activity: Textbook: Chapter 4, 5 Lesson Minimum of 1 scholarly source

Required Resources
Read/review the following resources for this activity:

Textbook: Chapter 4, 5
Lesson
Minimum of 1 scholarly source (in addition to the textbook)
Initial Post Instructions
During the 1930s, much of the world seemed to give up on their hope for a democratic solution to their problems and instead turned to totalitarianism, both in Europe and in Asia.

For the initial post, select and address one of the following:

Germany/Hitler
USSR/Stalin
Japan/Tojo
Address the following questions for your selection:

What effects did the history, politics, and economies of those areas play in their decisions to turn to totalitarianism?
What role did the Great Depression in the United States play in their plight?
Follow-Up Post Instructions
Respond to at least one peer. At least one of your responses should be to a peer who chose an option different from yours. Further the dialogue by providing more information and clarification.

Writing Requirements

Minimum of 2 posts (1 initial

History 255, Summarize/analyze

(1) Summarize the major themes from the assigned secondary source reading
(2) Analyze at least one of the assigned primary source documents in-depth in relation to the assigned secondary source readings and/or lectures
(3) Relate the assigned reading to something discussed earlier this semester or to a current event or personal life experience. No more than 2 pages (double spaced), only from the two readings provided, need done by thursday 7pm

Empires in the New World

Part I: Analyzing History: The Historian’s CraftThis assignment will ask you to do a few things:A. Read/Analyze a set of primary sources, including art works, first-hand accounts, and letters, related to the historical period of Spanish and Portuguese expansionB. Analyze sources and start thinking how they will support your thesis statement.*The objective of Part I is to get students to think like a historian, doing many of the same things that people in this profession and field of study do.
Part II: The Write UpTaking a look at empires and global trading networks during a period of imperial expansion. How do the sources provide information about empires, and what they pursued in the New World? Please explain if the images and documents provided yield a sufficient account of what the experience was like for both natives and European exploration and conquest.
Formulating a Thesis: Create a thesis statement! Please do not be intimidated by this, just think of a solid statement that will support your argument throughout the write up. Your thesis statement should respond to the sources you will analyze (i.e. slides/docs/etc). This should be in your beginning paragraph.
Part III: Wrapping it upThinking Hypothetically: If you feel that you could use or integrate another primary source(s) to get a better understanding of this cultural exchange, what kind of sources would you be looking for? Include this part in the end.

Documents to Read/View:Research Assignment 1 PowerpointColumbus Scan A -A Spanish Account of the First Encounter-Aztec Account of the First Encounter
Columbus Scan B-Letter from Christopher Columbus to King Ferdinand of SpainYour written response should be at least 300-400 words and in short essay format. Please italicize or underline your thesis statement. ***Please reference any of the sources you decide to use to get credit for this assignment (e.g. Columbus Letter to King of Spain, Slide 4, Aztec Account of First Encounter)***
Note: (I attached the requirement file for better view)

Compare the way two of the Southeast Asian countries are dealing with the Covid-19 crisis. Draw from 4 credible

Compare the way two of the Southeast Asian countries are dealing with the Covid-19 crisis.

Draw from 4 credible new sources (Radio Free Asia, BBC Asia, NY Times, SF Chronicle, Bangkok post). Sources must be published after October 1, 2021. Be sure to cite these sources, including the webpage.
The essay should be 400-500 words.
Remember to turn in your essay as a Word document (.doc or .docx).
Refresher: The countries of Southeast Asia are Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Myanmar, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, East Timor, and the Philippines.

Discussion post

Instructions:
Response. Using the relevant sources in the readings mentioned in the current week’s Discussion board, write and submit one 350 word Response to one of the prompts mentioned in that board. Put your name and the prompt number (or chapter number for Weeks 4 and 7) in the subject line of your Response. Unless the prompt instructs otherwise, the Response should use 3-5 sources (of which at least 2 must be text-based), and the sources must be named in the body of the Response. The Response must be split into paragraphs. This is due Sunday at 11:59pm.
Comment. After you have submitted your Response, write and submit one 75 word Comment on one classmate’s Response. Your Comment must present different material from your Response and must add something to what the other student wrote (contributing a new perspective, contrasting their argument, etc.). Content that does not add to the conversation (congratulating, repeating, agreeing, providing feedback on their writing, etc.) will not be considered for scoring. This is due Monday at 11:59pm.
General. Posts must refer to sources by title or author, not by source number. Chapter/book introductions should be read, but cannot be the basis for a post. All submitted content must be included in the post (no links or attachments). Posts must use proper spelling and grammar. Restatements or quotes of the prompt do not contribute to the word count. You may quote from the readings, but the total quoted material must be no more than 20% of the post’s word count. All quotes must appear between quotation marks and must include the page number(s) where the quote is found. Review this website to see some of the actions that constitute plagiarism. No lectures or other sources may be used in writing a post. Posts may not be deleted or substantially edited after submission. Late Responses receive a 1-point penalty (out of 7 possible points), and an additional 1-point penalty is added every two hours. Late Comments receive no points.
1) How do each of the four sources present the effectiveness or ineffectiveness of Republican governments in the southern states? Among other topics, be sure to address what is different about each source’s approach and content, how these governments are described, and the views of carpetbaggers and scalawags.
2) How do each of the four sources view African Americans? Among other topics, be sure to address what is different about each source’s approach and content, any racial assumptions about African Americans, and any arguments about their role in shaping Reconstruction and their own lives.
3) How do each of the four sources view the overturning of Reconstruction? Among other topics, be sure to address what is different about each source’s approach and content, whether the seizure of power by white southerners is viewed as a welcome or regrettable development, and the role of the terrorist organizations like the Ku Klux Klan.
https://books.google.com/books?id=UITaAgAAQBAJ