Competition Bikes Inc Case Study My Assignment Essay Help

Table of Contents
Costing based on activity Profitability study based on activity-based pricing Case study: Competition Bike's new system in San Diego References

Costing based on activity

Activity-based costing is a superior method for cost estimate and allocation since it assigns specific expenses to a product in both batch and unit form. Budgeting and pricing strategies for Competition Biking Company could consider employing the strategy. The strategy allows management to identify inefficient areas and links; it assures that certain costs may be ascribed to specific commodities, particularly when a company deals with multiple products. When dealing with several products, some fixed expenses, incurred by the company as a whole, pertain more to certain products: when accounted for using the activity-costing method, the precise cost to be assigned to a commodity can be determined. This allows for a more accurate estimation of the costs spent by a particular product.

The price set by management for a product is a function of the costs incurred in its production; activity cost methods provide a more precise estimate of the cost of a product, allowing management to set a more accurate price for the product. Using the traditional costing method, where costs are only categorized as variable and fixed, in a company producing multiple products (as is the case with competition bicycles), total fixed costs are divided equally among all products; however, some products have a higher utility of fixed costs, thereby reducing their cost. Alternatively, products with less fixed costs may be ranked highly under the premise that they utilized a greater amount of fixed costs.

Competition Biking Company should implement and utilize the activity costing method since it will enable the company in obtaining a more effective costing method for budgeting and prospective profit predictions, production budgets, and finance allocation. The nature of Competition Biking Company necessitates a technique of cost allocation that takes into account the different expenses associated with several bike brands. Some bicycles demand more care, hence the optimum method for determining their cost is an activity costing mechanism.

In the 4Ps (Product, Price, Promotion, and Place) of marketing, the price of a product takes center stage; it should consider two factors. It considers the requirement to cover manufacturing costs and provide a profit margin to the producing company, as well as the buyers' ability to afford the goods. Competition Bike Limited's pricing should consider these two factors; therefore, it is essential to have a costing strategy that considers these two areas. The activity costing approach enables a business to have a well-balanced cost for all commodities, ensuring that Competition Bike Limited does not incur losses and that their products are cheap.

Competition Bike Limited should consider implementing an activity-based costing system. It will help when budgeting and choosing prices to charge for their products, regardless of the brand name (Noreen, Brewer & Garrison, 2011).

Controlling the costs of a company's activities is one of its greatest challenges; costs can be properly managed if they are associated with a specific output rather than being shared. The ABC cost management approach supports a business in determining the true price of a commodity and identifying any inefficiencies that can be managed to reduce expenses. This contributes to the management of product costs. Certain areas that can be addressed result in an overall decrease in a company's expenses.

Profitability study based on activity-based pricing

The noble objective of a business is to generate profits; fixed and variable costs must be covered by sales before profits can be realized. Fixed costs are those costs that must be incurred regardless of whether production is occurring; they are, by definition, constant. These costs must be incurred as long as a business is operational; they include security, annual maintenance, management and administrative charges, rent, among others. In the CVP technique, costs are distributed proportionally to each product, however in the activity-based method, costs can be divided and allocated to each product or production run. When sales have been made, it is rationally expected that these have been covered by original sales proceeds. At break even, a company does not earn a profit, but its fixed costs have been "recouped" through the sale of its products (Noreen, Brewer & Garrison, 2011).

The calculation is as follows:

At the point of breakeven, total fixed costs equal entire sales revenue.

Break-even formula = fixed costs/contribution per unit

Thus, the breakeven point is influenced by changes in contribution margin and fixed costs.

San Diego's Competition Bike new system

In this instance, the corporation acquired a facility that may assist in the production of Titanium Bikes and Carbon light Bikes, which are sold at different rates. The bikes were priced at $900 for titanium and $1,495 for carbon lite. Let's investigate the breakeven point separately for each Bike:

Titanium

With a sales mix of 900:500 for Titanium and carbon Lite respectively, Titanium Bikes had a contribution of 221 and a break-even threshold of 1415; this indicated that the company required to produce at least 1451 bikes for the category of Bikes in the plant to pay the fixed expenses associated with them. With this manufacturing, the company will have produced no profit from its line of business. The current breakeven figure for sales, which is a multiple of the selling price and quantity of titanium bicycles, is 1,273,585.

When calculating contribution margin, the difference between the selling price of the commodity and its variable costs is evaluated.

Following a 10% rise in direct expenses and a $50,000 increase in fixed costs, the Titanium production line will be affected as follows:

The contribution margin will decrease from $221 to $191, and fixed expenses will increase. To offset the increase in fixed costs and the decrease in contribution margin, an additional 677 Titanium Bikes had to be produced. The current breakeven point is 2092 units. At this breakeven point, the new sales revenue is $1,882,456.

Carbon-Light

The price of the brand of Bikes is $1,495 with a contribution margin of $111. The breakeven number of units is 786; therefore, for the company to cover all fixed expenses related with the manufacturing of Carbon Lite Bikes, it must produce at least 786 Carbon Lite Bikes. At this moment, the sales revenue will be 1,175,314, which is the product of selling price and number of breakeven threshold units.

When the cost of production increases by 10% due to an increase in direct material costs, the contribution margin of the Bikes brand will decrease (contribution margin = selling price minus variable costs). Second, the increase in variable expenses is accompanied by a $50,000 increase in fixed costs; according to the breakeven calculation, the breakeven point is affected by any changes in fixed costs and contribution margin.

In this instance, the fixed expenses have grown as the contribution margin has decreased; hence, the new breakeven threshold units must be increased to account for the change.

The new contribution margin will be 44 and the breakeven point will be 1162; the contribution margin has decreased by $67. 376 more units have been added to the total. At the new point of breakeven, the total sales revenue is $1,732,205.

The unit increase was intended to cover the fluctuating fixed expenses.

Integrated plant operation

Prior to a shift in fixed expenses and an increase in variable costs, the company needed 2,201 units of both Titanium and Carbon Lite Bikes, which would have contributed $2,448,899. After a $50,000 rise in fixed costs and a 10% increase in production costs, the plant required 3254 units with a total sale revenue of $3,619,667. (Carlon, 2009).

Conclusion

At breakeven, there is neither a profit nor a loss margin; the units produced pay the fixed expenses incurred during the production process (total revenue equals total costs). Keeping commodity selling price constant, an increase in fixed costs and a fall in contribution margin will result in a rise in the break-even quantity.

References

Carlon, S. et al (2009). Accounting: the development of business skills John Wiley and Sons, New York

Noreen, E., Brewer, B., & Garrison, H. (2011). Accounting management for managers. McGraw Hill, New York

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The Role Of SWOT Analysis In Marketing My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

Businesses use marketing tactics to develop their products or services with the goal of facilitating processes both within and outside the firm. To examine the environment in which the organization evolves, it is necessary to employ methodologies and procedures capable of objectively identifying the most important and motivating variables. One of the most efficient ways in this regard is the SWOT Analysis, which examines the critical factors comprising a company's current successes, prospects, and dangers resulting from internal and external influences.

Therefore, the execution of the SWOT analysis affords the possibility to evaluate a company's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, which reveal the enterprise's current position and future growth potential.

SWOT Analysis Overview

The objective of the SWOT analysis is to determine how a firm evolves and which positive and negative aspects influence its operation process. As a method for monitoring the external and internal marketing environment, specialists employ this type of study (Kotler & Keller, 2016, p. 48). The method states that there are two dimensions within which the performance of a corporation is evaluated.

These dimensions are depicted in the matrix (see Appendix 1), and they include the kind of environment (internal or external) and the strength of a factor's influence (positive or negative). Thus, the internal environment consists of strengths and weaknesses, whereas the exterior environment consists of opportunities and threats (Kotler & Keller, 2016). Such a structured delineation between environmental impacts permits the formation of a clear and logical overview of a company's working plan.

The information collected upon completion of the study aids the strategic action of leaders who seek improved methods of growth and goal attainment. According to Kotler and Keller (2016), superior marketing is "the art of identifying, developing, and capitalizing on opportunities detected by the macro- and microenvironments" (p. 49). Marketers can use the information gained from analyzing market trends to improve product manufacture or service delivery. Therefore, the SWOT analysis is a potent instrument that, when conducted properly, can reveal a variety of intriguing growth chances for a company.

Amazon Company Analysis Using the SWOT Model

Amazon is currently one of the leading businesses in the world. The application of the SWOT analysis to an organization's environmental forces and elements allows for the identification of positive and negative, internal and external factors. Amazon is the largest online retailer that delivers goods and items internationally and has a vast global network of wholesalers (Wiggington, 2018). It is vital to examine the essential components of the SWOT analysis to elucidate the causes for the company's performance and its potential future avenues for growth.

Strengths

It is only logical to begin the study with Amazon's strengths. First, its most potent characteristic is its scale, which encompasses a high volume of trade and results in annual income growth. The 2017 financial report revealed a profit of US$177,866,000,000, a market-leading result (Wiggington, 2018). Thus, Amazon's dominating revenue position is one of the company's primary strengths. Second, Amazon offers a wide choice of products from various manufacturers and brands, which increases the number of products and customers (Simmons & Kang, 2018). Thirdly, the organization has created superior distribution logistics to ensure on-time delivery and client satisfaction (Wiggington, 2018). This strength leads to the fourth one, which is evaluating the performance of the company based on consumer feedback.

Eight years in a row, the American Customer Satisfaction Index poll has ranked Amazon as the number one firm in terms of customer satisfaction (2017 Letter to shareholders, 2018). Amazon achieves its maximum level of development and improves performance quality in the domain of IT technology advancement (2017 Letter to shareholders, 2018). All of Amazon's stated benefits illustrate the internal aspects that contribute to the company's success on the worldwide online retail industry.

Weaknesses

In addition to its strengths, the organization exhibits disadvantages due to internal environmental factors. Amazon's engagement in "patent infringement cases" that may "affect stakeholder confidence" is one of its primary downsides (Wiggington, 2018, p.13). These issues primarily impact the company's use of internet technology and harm its reputation. The decline in Amazon's liquidity was reaffirmed in its 2017 financial report, constituting a further weakness for the company (Wiggington, 2018). This is closely related to the insufficient cash flow caused by the Internet as the enterprise's performance arena. This data sheds light on an additional issue that stems from the company's exclusive focus on online retail. Such a narrow scope of development could be considered an impediment to further growth.

Opportunities

A review of the external elements that influence Amazon’s growth enables the identification of the most likely future growth scenarios for the corporation. Amazon's investments and employment creation represent one of its primary opportunities (2017 Letter to shareholders, 2018). The firm initiates corporate links and investments with Ring Inc., Bonitasoft, and others, so expanding its scope of operations and acquiring new growth opportunities. Additionally, Amazon launches products from third parties, fostering the growth of small enterprises (2017 Letter to shareholders, 2018). Therefore, Amazon has numerous external opportunities to achieve its long-term objectives.

Threats

The macroenvironmental forces also pose threats to Amazon. One of the potential key drawbacks is intense competition in the market for online retail businesses (Wiggington, 2018). Internet technologies constitute a rapidly evolving industry in which fierce competition exists. Amazon, as a market leader, leverages superior technology and systems. Therefore, it forms rival ties with other businesses that employ comparable strategies. Such companies include Google, Apple, and eBay, which all offer online shopping services (Wiggington, 2018). Amazon must maintain its strengths, capitalize on its opportunities, and limit its flaws in order to weather the imminent dangers.

Conclusion

SWOT analysis provides an ideal opportunity to conduct a rational and well-structured examination of a business's strategy. It takes into account external and internal aspects that have a good and negative impact on the organization in order to identify its weak and strong points, as well as external opportunities and threats. The application of the SWOT analysis to Amazon, one of the largest online retailers, revealed that the company obtains substantial annual income and utilizes a high-quality distribution network to supply a wide variety of products.

Despite its declared reduction in liquidity and its confinement to the online domain, it is a viable, expanding business. As a result of its investment program, Amazon is able to withstand the challenges of intense competition and continue its global expansion.

References

Kotler, P. T., & Keller, K. L. (2016). Marketing management (15th ed.). Pearson Education, New York, New York

Simmons, A., & Kang, J. H. (2018). Comparing the advantages and disadvantages of Amazon.com vs Macy's as fashion stores. Proceedings of the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference, vol. 78.

2017 Shareholder Letter (2018). Web.

Wiggington, D. K. (2018). David becomes Goliath at Amazon. Integrated Studies, no.180. Web.

Appendix 1. SWOT Matrix

Internal SWOT Environment External Environment

Positive Strengths Advantages

Negative Weaknesses Pose a Danger

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KACEN Company’s Sales Plan My Assignment Essay Help

Table of Contents
Current Issues Objectives of the Sales Plan Sales Organization Customer Segmentation and Additional Work International Trade Recommendations Budget Conclusion Bibliography

Current Issues

KACEN is a pharmaceutical firm currently suffering difficulties as a result of past sales mishandling. As a result of past mismanagement, a substantial number of clients have an unfavorable view of the company, leaving it vulnerable to attack by rivals. 56% of all potential clients in the regions of Cadiz and Malaga have not been reached. Those clients who have been contacted earlier are concerned about the side effects, price, effectiveness, and contraindications of the diarrhea medication produced by the firm lab. There is no clear information about the clients because no follow-up procedures were conducted. There was a lack of client input in the communication, which resulted in a lack of knowledge regarding their preferences.

Due to poor compensation and excessive work hours, the personnel appears to be unprepared and unmotivated in their current position. Four managers, including myself, are available to pursue additional clients, but the current efforts are insufficient to cover a larger geographical area. The current status of the company necessitates a reassessment of the current sales goals, as they are unattainable.

The company's anti-diarrhea medication is praised for its rapid effectiveness. However, due to the company's unfavorable reputation among consumers, issues such as its side effects are gaining prominence. The price is also slightly greater than that of generic anti-diarrhea medications. Transporting the product from Barcelona to Malaga is also troublesome because the trip takes too long.

The company's primary competitors are three. Each employs distinctive tactics that must be evaluated. The first is focused on investing in digital communication channels to market their goods and communicate with customers. Additionally, they participate extensively in medical congresses. The first rival is regarded as the market leader due to the product's maturity and mild side effects. Their primary flaw is the product's exorbitant price. On the market, the second competitor is less well-known. The company uses an electronic reporting system that can be used to make informed marketing decisions to compensate for its limited exposure.

Despite its product's lack of popularity, the company has a strong presence at medical congresses. The product's effectiveness is slow, it has few negative effects, and it has the second-highest price on the market. iPads are used by the last rival to track customer information. Their product is a low-priced generic pharmaceutical with no known adverse effects. However, its efficacy is gradual.

Objectives of the Sales Plan

After examining the company's existing position in its environment, specific goals may be outlined. The company's overall objective is to acquire new clients for the distribution of lactobacillus acidophilus produced by the company lab. However, this objective cannot be achieved without resolving the majority of the difficulties discussed in the preceding section.

Consequently, one of the initial measures would consist of assisting the unmotivated and underperforming sales managers. Consequently, steps must be done to enhance the company's reputation within the various groups of its client base. New ways should be established for reaching customers and recording their comments.

Along with the budget forecast, it would be necessary to set new sales objectives.

Sales Organization

One of the most important qualities of a key account manager is motivation, yet the team is currently demotivated due to their previous work experiences. This issue must be tackled with different solutions in order to increase salespeople's motivation and performance. Members of the team have previously attributed their lack of motivation to poor salary and unrealistic work hours. This is why a reform to their salary system should be implemented immediately.

Currently, sales managers receive only a fixed income, which does not push them to perform more effectively. Commissions and bonuses for their sales should be implemented as the key change to this system. For example, a manager may receive 10% of the profit from each sale. If they are the team's most successful manager, they may receive a financial bonus. Despite the enormous number of clients requiring care, these two additions should motivate the team. At the conclusion of each month, the managers would be reviewed, and their accomplishments would be recognized to demonstrate the company's appreciation for their efforts.

The low performance of sales managers is the second concern with sales managers. During the examination, just one of the managers demonstrated significant results, and it is not certain that they will be able to maintain them. During the first three months of the year, a series of training sessions will be held to guarantee that the entire team is capable of performing to the best of their capacity. The team will receive training in the following areas: negotiation, closing, public speaking, presentations, iPad sales applications, and CRM.

Training in negotiation and closing would be essential for a manager's ability to attract and cultivate relationships with clients. Training in public speaking and presenting is required to enhance the company's reputation at medical congresses. The new tools that will be provided to managers to facilitate their work with clients and databases require training on the iPad and CRM. The acquisition of four iPads and four CRM systems with licenses would be advantageous for the team.

Managers would be able to submit new customer information immediately after a meeting using an iPad, and with the usage of CRM, this data would be safely kept, tracked, and used in the future to generate marketing plans, strategic decisions, and even the launch of new goods (Kubacki, 2015). All of these actions must be implemented within the first quarter in order for the company's representatives to achieve their objectives.

The sales targets themselves must be decreased. I feel it would be necessary to evaluate both qualitative and quantitative factors. Among the qualitative factors would be public perception of the company and product awareness. By the end of the year, the public impression of the company should be favorable, and product awareness should have increased by 40 percent. Quantitative objectives include the number of contacts with clients and the number of closed sales. 30% of uncontacted clients must be contacted by the end of the fourth quarter, and at least 20% must order the product.

After the training sessions conclude, the team will be split in half. Those who reside in Malaga will be assigned to clients in Malaga. The remaining two Seville-based managers will be assigned to Cadiz. Even though Seville management would still have to travel, the distance between Malaga and Cadiz is substantially greater. By splitting the teams, we could minimize excessive travel. In addition, the issue of product transportation should be overcome by shifting from the current system of product delivery to one in which the product is transported directly to customers, rather than to Malaga first. As with earlier initiatives, it is advised that these modifications be implemented during the first quarter because they will be crucial for subsequent quarters' work.

Customer Segmentation and Future Activities

Due to a lack of forethought and ineffective bargaining tactics adopted by the former manager, essentially little information regarding the customer's voice is currently available to the company, as was previously stated. The only readily available information regarding the opinions of the customers is included inside the four client profiles. They are split by concerns regarding the product's efficacy, side effects, contraindications, and pricing.

To acquire a better grasp of the customer's requirements, it would be beneficial to call the marketing research firm that approached us about this topic earlier. This information must be acquired prior to any customer talks; therefore, it should be acquired in the first quarter. It should be particularly useful in conjunction with the training and technologies that managers will receive throughout the same time frame.

Our current examination of client segmentation reveals several areas that require attention. The most devoted consumers of our organization are concerned about the product's adverse effects. Those who are more likely to become our loyal customers care more about the efficacy and contraindications. Despite being a worry for everyone save the most committed clients, the problem of price is of lesser importance. These results show that prior to the involvement of a marketing research firm, the primary focus of negotiations and public appearances should be on downplaying adverse effects and promoting the notion that our product is highly effective.

After training and preparing the sales managers, the organization must concentrate on rehabilitating its public image and acquiring new clients. Marketing will be conducted using electronic resources, including an educational website and advertisements on medical websites. Beginning marketing activities in the first quarter will allow them to coincide with the conclusion of training. The product's packaging will be updated to eliminate any unfavorable visual associations with previous customer service.

To begin the company's public regeneration in the eyes of its clients, the team will unveil our new ideas at a medical congress. During the public presentation, managers are required to apply the training they received to describe the company's new, customer-focused sales strategy. The product's favorable attributes will be emphasized, and earlier issues will be addressed swiftly but decisively. In order to give an effective product, the audience must see that the organization is prepared to provide excellent customer service. Following the congress, audience members will get promotional gift bundles comprising company products. The bundles will include company-branded caps, pens, and cups.

Consequently, sales managers can begin focusing on communicating with clients via their chosen channels. The marketing organization should be able to provide information regarding their preferences. If the technique is unknown, the manager must ensure to inquire about the client's preferences. This will be the management teams' primary routine from the conclusion of the first congress through the end of the year. As sales and marketing research are tightly intertwined, the previously licensed CRM system should increase the efficiency and speed of the process.

The sales managers' bargaining strategies should differ depending on the client segment. When communicating with loyal HH consumers, managers should employ collaborative negotiation strategies. Since they already support the product, the negotiators should determine how to maintain this support. Because they may have greater difficulties with the company that prohibit them from completely supporting it, sales managers could employ a compromise strategy when dealing with the HM client segment. Lastly, the MH client niche may be more receptive to an agreeable negotiation strategy. Their problem may be less complicated, but their aid is still incomplete. Therefore, managers must demonstrate that the organization is eager to solve their issues.

The product is now in the early phases of its lifespan and has the potential to grow greatly if the generation of new, loyal customers receives adequate attention. To encourage this, the company may implement a rewards program for pharmacies and hospitals that continue to engage with us (Wierenga & Lans, 2017). The primary benefit of a protracted relationship may be a price decrease. For instance, clients who order the product annually may be eligible for a discount. The new pricing will be between the cost of production and the product's usual price. These campaigns should motivate customers to choose the company over its rivals. The corporation can guarantee the product's efficacy, but by making it more affordable, it will have a competitive advantage against two of the three market leaders.

Recommendations Regarding International Commerce

The majority of this sales plan's efforts are geared around addressing the current difficulties facing the company. Nonetheless, the anticipated growth into the Portuguese pharmaceutics industry is one of the extra topics requiring attention. This would be the company's first try at foreign trading, so it must take a number of important factors into account. The commencement of international expansion should occur once the company has begun operating in accordance with its sales strategy. Consequently, it should commence at the conclusion of the second quarter and extend into the third. Thus, the company could determine whether or not it is prepared for the expansion (Hitt, Li, & Xu, 2016).

When growing, the corporation must pay close attention to the country's culture. Even while Portugal is not as far as some other nations, its culture may nevertheless have different perspectives on what is acceptable, appealing, and effective. It would be necessary to review the company's present marketing materials for features that do not accord with the cultural norms of Portugal.

Analyze the efforts of competitors to determine how similar items are advertised and how they succeed. Approaching a Portuguese agency or citizen could be advantageous when creating marketing materials to ensure that they seem natural and are not regarded insulting. The procedures for purchasing and selling may vary. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the inner workings of the overseas market (Cavusgil, Knight, Riesenberger, Rammal, & Rose, 2014).

When accessing international markets, it may be required to approach organizations that are already operating in the country, such as subsidiaries, licensors, and exporters. First, projects should be kept modest and concentrated on specific sections of the country that could affect the product's reception among consumers. The company's compliance with Portugal's rules and regulations must be ensured by a review of relevant legal documents. Primary advertising channels would also require scrutiny. Almost certainly, customer support will need to be outsourced.

Personal belief is that there is potential for expansion into Portugal due to its proximity and the fact that our drug treats a condition that is prevalent throughout the world. If the decision to grow is made, it will divert attention from the local market, making it more challenging to achieve the present sales objectives. In addition, it could make the company more vulnerable because it lacks a solid local reputation.

However, the corporation may find success in the new market, which could give additional revenue streams that would be inaccessible otherwise. Additionally, it would expand our portfolio, making future expansions easier. I believe expansion should be considered, but only when the company has solidified its position in the home market.

Taking on the Competition

To get an advantage over the competition, it is essential to evaluate the shortcomings of their products and the strengths of our own. Two of our competitors provide costly products with varying degrees of efficacy. Their adverse effects are comparable to ours, but due to the age of their products, they are of less concern to their clients. In terms of effectiveness, however, our product can immediately compete with the market leader. In addition, our prices are substantially reduced and are comparable to those of generic drugs used for the same objectives. Therefore, the key effort against them should be to demonstrate that substantially identical benefits can be obtained at far cheaper costs. When the product reaches a more mature phase of its lifespan, its results will be more appealing due to the lower price point. Since the production process cannot be altered, promotional materials must minimize adverse effects.

The third contender is a non-adverse-effect-reported generic medication. It is less efficient, but less expensive than ours. As previously indicated, a loyalty program would be the primary method of luring clients to our product as opposed to theirs (Wang, Lewis, Cryder, & Sprigg, 2016; Noble, Esmark, & Noble, 2014). Those who choose to help us would receive a more effective product at the same cost.

Budget

The budget for this sales strategy was one thousand MIUCs, and the following is a list of all the services and products required for its execution:

4 iPads; six training subjects; 300 pens; 200 cups; 100 hats; redesign; new packaging; change in distribution mechanism; 4 CRM licenses; marketing data.

The plan's total expense is roughly 550 MIUCs. The remaining monies may be used for staff bonuses, overseas market research, and any other funding-related matters. A lot of unanticipated occurrences are possible. Therefore, reserve cash should always be available to capitalize on opportunities or address problems.

Conclusion

Currently, the company's problems are severe enough to threaten the launch of the new product. However, by adhering to the recommendations outlined in this plan, it is possible to resolve a number of these issues and enhance the company's image. Due to the product's efficacy and affordability, it has the potential to become the market leader. If concerns with sales management are rectified, clients will receive individualized, high-quality customer service.

This would subsequently boost customer relations. Although a number of technology solutions and training sessions will be necessary, the plan comes in significantly under budget and leaves cash available for future endeavors. The anticipated outcomes could make KACEN a household name in the Spanish pharmaceutical business. I hope you find this sales strategy to be educational and encouraging.

References

Cavusgil, S. T., Knight, G., Riesenberger, J. R., Rammal, H. G., & Rose, E. L. (2014). International Business. Melbourne, Australia: Pearson, Australia.

Hitt, M. A., Li, D., & Xu, K. (2016). From local to global and beyond, international strategy Journal of International Business Studies, 51(1), 58–73. Web.

Kubacki, K. (Ed). (2015). Ideas in marketing consist of discovering the new and refining the old. Web site: Springer International Publishing, Cham, Switzerland.

Noble, S. M., Esmark, C. L., & Noble, C. H. (2014). (2014). The effect of managing policies on consumer commitments with regard to accumulation versus instant loyalty programs. 67(3) Journal of Business Research: 361–368. Web.

Y. Wang, M. Lewis, C. Cryder, and J. Sprigg (2016). A large-scale field experiment on the lasting consequences of goal achievement and failure inside consumer loyalty programs. Marketing Science, 35(4), p. 565 – 575 Web.

Wierenga, B., & Lens, R. (Eds). (2017). Handbook of marketing decision models. Web site: Springer International Publishing, Cham, Switzerland.

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The Russian Market: Currency And Financial Risks My Assignment Essay Help

Table of Contents
Executive Synopsis Introduction Discourse Suggestions Sources Cited

Executive Synopsis

Due to the size and spending power of its consumers, the Russian market is extremely attractive to investors. Recent government initiatives that have opened the Russian market to the world community have contributed to the nation's successful economy. However, the country's financial system has been weak for many years, keeping the ruble weak against the U.S. dollar and other major foreign currencies.

The country's economic crisis, particularly in 1998, devalued the ruble to dollar exchange rate by about 70%. This caused significant financial dangers for business units in this country, as their currencies had lost 70% of their purchase power. The ruble market has deteriorated due to state policies that prioritize war above development projects. The ongoing conflict over Crimea between Russia and the West is simply aggravating the problem. Consequently, investing in this country is dangerous and necessitates the implementation of robust financial risk mitigation strategies.

Introduction

Over the years, the Russian market has been one of the most appealing in Europe. The country's abundance of minerals reduces the price of energy oil. Analysis of the business climate in this country reveals that the government has made significant progress in opening the Russian market to the rest of the globe. According to a report by Ledeneva (34), the number of international companies entering this industry has expanded dramatically. The market's size and purchasing power are particularly appealing. However, cautious participation into this market is advised. The Russian economy has been plagued by economic difficulties that have harmed not only its currency and financial system, but also the country's business climate. The goal of this study is to determine the amount of currency and financial risks associated with the Russian market.

Discussion

In order for our company to enter the Russian market, we must have a thorough understanding of the financial system's past and present situation in order to provide direction during the decision-making process. In order to foresee the future of this country's financial system, the top management must have a thorough understanding of its past and current state. According to Robinson (27), Russia is among the most mineral-rich nations in the world. It is the second largest energy producer in the world, surpassing the United States into third place. This has helped the economy of this country tremendously, even during times of economic difficulty. It is the primary supplier of energy to the nations of the European Union, which has resulted in a decrease in the cost of electricity compared to other European countries.

Foreign investors who were previously unable to invest in the country have lauded the latest government strategy that encourages an open Russian market. These favorable business climate variables may persuade investors that this is the greatest country in Europe in which to invest. Nevertheless, some of the above-mentioned data must be viewed with some caution. Recent changes to company laws have made investing in the country easier than it was previously. This does not imply that these policies are the most alluring in Europe. (Schermerhorn, 53)

The financial system of this country and the soundness of its currency have been concerning during the previous two decades. Terterov (64) writes that after the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia continued to utilize the ruble as its primary currency and eliminated banknotes. After the fall of the Union, Russia's imports increased significantly while its exports decreased. The country was compelled to import, among other things, advanced machinery and specialist services.

This raised the dollar's demand in the country. Local business units were compelled to outsource some services abroad, which further reduced the ruble's value. Due to the animosity between Russia and the United States in the 1990s, this currency risk grew greater. The Russian administration placed an overwhelming amount of focus on this ideological struggle while ignoring the necessity for development. In 1998, when the country was experiencing an economic crisis, the Russian ruble had one of its most stunning occurrences.

Robinson (77) states that the currency lost 70% of its value against the US dollar. Several years later, this inflation had a ripple effect on the ruble's value. From 2005 to 2008, the ruble market grew rapidly as a result of government actions designed to decrease the currency risks faced by local businesses. However, the global economic recessions of 2008 and 2009 hindered this progress. This had little effect on the currency because it affected a number of other major economies, particularly the United States.

On the financial market, the value of the ruble has decreased due to the Russian government's recent decision to seize Crimea from Ukraine. The West has subjected the Russian government to economic sanctions. Europe, the largest market for Russian commodities, is currently reassessing its economic ties with this nation. Some prominent businessmen with close ties to the Russian president, Vladimir Putin, have also received travel bans to nations where they conduct business. The country is in disarray, and the business climate is most negatively impacted by this war. During the ongoing battle, the cordial connection between Russia and China has not helped to stabilize this country's economy. Schermerhorn (73) observes that the Russian currency market has been turbulent for an extended length of time.

This country's financial system contributes to the volatility of the ruble market. According to Terterov (56), Russian financial institutions are among the most active borrowers on the money markets of the West. The debt burden renders this currency even weaker than it was during the Cold War. Therefore, the management of this company must be aware that it is entering a market with a volatile ruble market. The currency has stayed weak not due to a devaluation, but due to a flawed financial system and an economy that prioritizes conflict over development projects.

Recommendations

This company should examine the following suggestions.

The entry into the Russian market should be deferred until the current issue over Crimea has subsided. These assets should be allocated to emerging markets in South America, Asia, or perhaps Africa. When entering the Russian market, management must be prepared to combat the aforementioned financial risks. As an entry strategy for this uncertain sector, the management should explore forming strategic alliances with companies that are already present.

Sources Cited

Ledeneva, Alena. Economy of Favors in Russia: Blat, Networking, and Informal Exchange. Cambridge [u.a.: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1998. Print.

Robinson, Neil. The Russian Political Economy. 2012 Print. – Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Schermerhorn, John. Management. Hoboken, N.J: Wiley, 2010. Print.

Marat Terterov, Doing Business with Russia. London: GMB Publishing, 2004.

[supanova question]

Resource-Based Theories In Strategic Management My Assignment Essay Help

The essay titled "A historical comparison of resource-based theory and five schools of thought within industrial organization economics" by Conner (1991) Do we have a new business theory? consists of an empirical investigation of resource-based theories. The essay begins by highlighting the five major theories of the firm from the economics of industrial organization. The first theory is the neoclassical theory of perfect competition, which views companies as combiners of inputs.

In this idea, the author emphasizes how a company integrates its resources to create a final product. Aside from that, the next theory discussed is the bain-type industrial organization economics, in which the author believes that businesses are production restrainers. Conner argues that the corporation restrains productive input through power monopolization or collusion with other companies. The third hypothesis highlighted is Schumpeter's reaction, which focuses on the dynamics of enterprises as innovative competitors. In this section, the author summarizes Schumpeter's argument that a company's mission is to capture competitive chances by producing or adopting innovations that render competing positions obsolete. The next idea emphasized is the Chicago reaction, a renaissance price theory with enterprises seeking production and distribution efficiencies.

The author emphasizes that this theory explains certain techniques supplied by the bain type theory of monopolization, wherein, as the author explains, the firm's size and scope are evaluated according on its efficiency. In the final theory of Coase and Williamson's transaction cost economics, firms are portrayed as avoiding the costs of market exchange. The author emphasizes that this theory implies that enterprises exist to avoid the expenses of using the market price mechanism. As a conclusion, the author recommends additional study on resource-based theories and elaborates on the following: input levels, appropriate empirical proxies for company resources, and the relationship between the resource-based perspective and the new IO's game-theoretic approach.

Hansen & Wernefelt's “Determinants of firm performance, the relative relevance of economic and organizational factors” (1989) relies more on theory-based research. They emphasize the economic model of company performance, which is comprised of three major components: the economic model, the organizational model, and the integrated model. The economic model describes three classes: industry factors, variables relating to the firm's competitors, and firm variables.

The significance of the industry variable is indisputable when viewed as a whole. Aside from this, characteristics tying the firm to its competitors are seen as proxies for a relative competitive advantage unique to the firm. Aside from this, company variables are considered a source of organizational costs or inefficiency. The organizational model is primarily concerned with expressing the multidimensional nature of key organizational events and their consequences.

The research findings described the following as performance measurements, economic variables, and organizational variables: In the economic model, the relative market share variable was insignificant, but in the organizational model, it was highly significant, with coefficients pointing in the anticipated positive direction.

In contrast, the variables in the integrated model exhibit a positive and statistically significant result, indicating that the firm's market share is relative to its major competitors. The investigation lacked company information, which was crucial for obtaining reliable results. The authors also recommend that future researches obtain more precise and actual data from businesses in order to obtain more precise figures. In addition, the authors recommend that economists and organization theorists conduct additional research in this field so that they can benefit from its discoveries and increase the efficiency of businesses.

The 1993 empirical study by Peteraf entitled “The pillars of competitive advantage: a resource-based view” is based on resource-based theories. This article focuses on the competitive advantage model. The author emphasizes four primary benefits. The first is heterogeneity, in which the author claims that enterprises with diverse competencies can compete in the market and at least break even.

Additionally, the author outlines two types of arguments, namely Ricardian rents and Monopoly rents. In addition, the author describes the ex-post constraints to competition. In this paper, the author discusses imperfect imitability and imperfect substitutability as two crucial issues that constrain competitiveness. The author then emphasizes the imperfect mobility point, which asserts that the firm will continue to have access to imperfectly movable resources and will share the rents. The final factor that the author emphasizes is competition ex-ante restrictions. In addition to the above, the author emphasizes the uses of resource-based models.

Peteraf proposes that, within a single corporate plan, the model might assist managers in differentiating between essential and non-essential resources. Aside from that, this is characterized in corporate strategy as the internal buildup of assets with transaction costs. The author also finds that this is an essential characteristic of a sound theory of diversification. In addition, there is a testable hypothesis at the conclusion for further investigation. This is the only corporate scope theory capable of explaining the spectrum of diversification in all its richness, from related confined to conglomerate form, so the argument goes.

Is the resource-based view a helpful perspective for strategic management research?

2001's ” is a theory-based paper. The article focuses mostly on analyzing the resource-based view (RBV) as a theory. The article begins with a description of the resource-based view. According to one viewpoint, the firm's resources and its goods are two sides of the same coin. ” (Wernerfelt, 1984) The paper then analyzes the RBV as a hypothesis.

The three highlighted points included generalized conditionals, empirical content, and the exhibit's nomic need. In the first section, the author describes the lawlike generalizations in the RBV and concludes that some of the assertions must be lawlike since they are generalized conditionals, have empirical content, and demonstrate nomic necessity. The author finds, for the first point, that an RBV contains statements such as "if/then" statements.

In addition, in the empirical content argument, the author suggests that there exist analytical statements that are true by definition, indicating that the definition of RBV as a lawlike generalization is false. In the third argument, which is the nomic necessity, the author asserts that even if the claims were true at the time they were stated, it is simple for anybody to create counterfactual conditions that might readily disprove them.

Aside from that, the author elaborates on the RBV's logic. The author recommends that the assertions' logical consistency could be evaluated. In addition to this, the author argues that there are components of the RBV fallacy. In addition to the aforementioned, the author examines whether or not the RBV is acceptable for strategy research and then outlines some of the limitations encountered. Thus, the author recommends formalizing the RBV, answering the how questions, and incorporating temporal content.

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Strategic Management And Strategic Formulation By Primack Company My Assignment Essay Help

The Outline

Bain is a consulting business that was founded in 1973 by a group of Boston Consulting Group defectors. Under the direction of Bill Bain, the group's primary objective was to create a strategy-consulting firm that would not only provide office counseling to their clients, diagnosis of business problems, and well-written reports on what they needed to do, but would also participate in the implementation of their own recommendations and be judged on the results. This concept was groundbreaking at the time, and it remains the guiding premise of the firm today. Orit Gadiesh, chairwoman of Bain, was able to devise a successful turnaround strategy despite an initial financial crisis. Despite her gender, she was able to devise and implement a plan to lift Bain out of its gloom. In the case study, Bain is described as claiming that gender was not a problem for her, but that it was for others.

A Harvard Business School MBA graduate demonstrated her brilliance by transforming Bain from near-bankruptcy to tremendous success.

As seen by the company's performance, Bain's is one of the top-performing consulting firms in the consulting and management business, according the case study. This achievement is largely attributable to the company's exceptional work environment. The management of Bain has also acquired the devotion of their personnel, who refer to themselves with pride as "Baines." The workers are (partially) compensated based on the performance of the company, and they approve of this arrangement.

The causes of Bain's financial disaster

According to the complaint, Bain's insolvency was caused by its founders. As Gadiesh explains, the founders of Bain sold out in the mid-1980s, leaving the company with substantial debts. According to the facts of the case, Bain was unable to pay its creditors, resulting in a financial crisis. Gadiesh claims that within a few years, Bain's growing debts brought the company near to insolvency. Additionally, the founder's rigidity and resistance to Bain's culture may have contributed to the company's issues. Poor management by Bain's founders has led to the company's precarious predicament.

Initially, I thought that the organization would experience a number of nervous breakdowns during the height of the crisis and in its attempt to escape it. The problem associated with bankruptcy is not simple to resolve. In the first instance, it indicates that the organization's activities will be severely impacted by a lack of funding. Consequently, such procedures will be affected to some degree. In fact, bankruptcy could bring an end to all business operations. Even worse, the law governing bankruptcy is an organizational nightmare. A bankruptcy or insolvency declaration may have catastrophic repercussions. Creditors and other stakeholders might file for the company's insolvency in an effort to rescue their investment. This will result in the firm being placed under receivership and ultimately liquidated, resulting in the company's demise. It is very difficult for Bain to avoid such situations. Additionally, the organization's sales and income are anticipated to fall in this circumstance. Similarly, the company's overall profitability will be significantly harmed. Bain has amassed a massive amount of debt, and it is such a challenge to offset these debts given the current financial crisis. At this vital juncture, creditors may not be as sympathetic and supportive as is required. For Bain, gaining the patience and understanding of creditors is a major concern. The founders of Bain, who are responsible for the company's insolvency, could be a hindrance to the rescue plan. They maintain a high regard for Bain's culture. It is possible that they will not support the implementation of the reorganization plan as envisioned by Gadiesh's group.

The obstacles and difficulties encountered by Bain and how Ms. Gadiesh's plan overcame them

There was an issue with Bain's management, and this posed a significant obstacle. To overcome this obstacle, such management must be modified. In 1993, Ms. Gadiesh was appointed as the chairperson of Bain to overcome this obstacle. This ushered in a new period for Bain. As her initial step in attempting to resolve the firm's issues, she was tasked with speaking with the company's founder in order to obtain their approval for reforms to continue. Even though she accomplished this task, the company's morale was severely damaged. Some employees had been laid off, while others had transferred to other companies. However, obtaining the approval of the founders was a critical success factor. Despite being a woman, Ms. Gadiesh was able to guide Bain through the problems in a manner that many did not foresee. In 1993, she was appointed chairman of Bain, making her the first woman to lead such a large consulting firm.

The north of the truth doctrine and Bain's turnaround

This worldview was heavily influenced by the Gadiesh concept of aiming to the right. The research describes her husband as an avid sailor who single-handedly rounded Cape Horn, which contributed to her inspiration for the idea of aiming right. Since then, this idea has become ingrained in the organization's culture. The aim-right worldview is not merely an ideology; it governs the way things are conducted at Bain. The Bain logo is a compass with the needle pointing a few degrees away from the vertical north.

As a strategy for achieving her goal of transforming Bain, Gadiesh's implementation of Bain's distinctive culture has a direct and positive impact and contribution. It creates the organization's identity, reminds members of their commitment to the organization, and fosters a sense of belonging. Positive attitude and pride on the part of the firm's present consultants can be attributed to this philosophy. Ms. Gadiesh, the chairman of Bain, has established and upheld the company's reputation for adherence to its core values. Indeed, it has been extremely advantageous for Bain. However, it is recognized as a primary source of organizational rigidity and resistance to necessary change. For instance, as Baines are generalists, the company had to thereafter establish a specialized IT section. And it has earned a poor profile in the dynamic consulting industry serving the public sector, primarily due to its inflexible pricing structure. This is a reflection of the adage "If you blindly head true north, you may eventually hit an iceberg." This culture was extremely beneficial to Bain's turnaround. This rigidity brought about by cultural beliefs was a significant barrier to success.

The value of the founder's legacy to the current Bain

Bill Bain's legacy will endure in the minds of many, despite the fact that he orchestrated a buyout proposal that nearly led to the insolvency of a company that is now a market-leading consulting firm. Bill was the pioneer of the approach of selling result-oriented advice to customers, an idea that is now extensively embraced and followed in the consulting industry and that made Bain one of the leading innovators in the consulting sector. According to Bain director Mitt Romney, who was recruited to Bain from BCG in the late 1970s by the firm's founder, he is the originator of the notion that consultancies should not be evaluated based on the length of their reports or even the elegance of their writing, but rather on whether or not the report was effectively implemented. This concept is being employed by Bain and is largely responsible for the firm's success in the consulting industry. After rescuing the firm from the brink of bankruptcy, Gadiesh has no intention of abandoning this concept. In reality, strengthening the strategy is the only viable option for a company emerging from bankruptcy. Bill Bain's most enduring contribution is the consulting culture he established, which has evolved into a highly determined, original culture to which other e-consultancy startups today owe their existence.

The culture of Bill Bain and contemporary Bain's success

As the firm grew, Bain argued for and implemented spacious offices where employees could both work and play, and more significantly, where consultants could be inculcated with company values. With such a policy, Bain's consultants were inculcated to be wholly client-focused. This culture was particularly appealing to both the insider consultants and the fresh MBA graduates, who constitute the majority and most dependable workforce of the company.

Those who know Bill cannot forget what he did in January 1991, when he and seven other founding partners of the firm agreed to return approximately $100 million to the firm in cash and forgiven debt, as well as all outstanding shares of Bain stock, in order to halt an escalating financial crisis that had been partially triggered by the founders’ hefty buyout price. According to the case study, this measure put Bain back on track and positioned the company to embrace new leadership, which is now credited with a decade of consistent development. Today, Bain aims to employ a similar method as it begins a novel and ostensibly more complex chapter in its history. This case demonstrates that the company's culture has been maintained and has proven extremely beneficial. Tom Tierney, Bain's first managing director, remarked that it was remarkable to transition from the founder's organization to a broad-based consulting firm in the 1990s without sacrificing the principles, mission, and organizational culture that drove Bain in the 1980s. The culture of client service is exemplified by Bain's first chairwoman Gadiesh, a non-executive chair who spends over 70% of her time on client-oriented service. This move is intended to rally the firm's MBA all-stars by emphasizing the firm's basic principle of serving customers with a single mind. In 1993, when Gadiesh was named to the chairmanship, she not only helped Bain out of a financial crisis in a shrewd manner, but she also helped develop a solid company culture. She is intelligent, original, and prefers not to maintain secrets, with the exception of her age. At the height of the financial crisis, when she was appointed chairperson of Bain, she assumed full control of a taskforce charged with identifying alternative financial possibilities to rescue the company. The leadership platform and new challenges enhance her professionally as a consultant.

Gadiesh and his devoted team are embarking on an expansion strategy after having helped the company recover. Nonetheless, the increase will inevitably raise new issues associated with diversity. The impending succession when Gadiesh's tenure expires, as stipulated by the firm's bylaws, is another difficulty the organization might anticipate in the near future. According to the case, one may only serve for a maximum of three terms, and she is currently serving her third and final term. Many employees of the company cannot envision a future without her. The firm's bylaws stipulate that the chairman's post can only be filled by an insider consultant, which dissuades the managing director from applying for the position and raises the difficulty level of the challenge.

The shift in management effective January 1, 2000 will usher in a new era for the company. John Donahoe's hiring as managing director is expected to usher in a time of rapid innovation at Bain. This presents a new challenge because it is likely to conflict with the culture and values of the company.

Lessons learned from the Bain turnaround situation

First, it might be realized that gender is not a barrier to achievement. Despite being a woman, Miss Gadiesh successfully devised a turnaround strategy. Her gender had no bearing on her abilities. Many firms lack female representation in upper management, which is central to this reality. This clearly illustrates how women are undervalued in management affairs. Gadiesh disapproved of this mistake by exceeding many people's expectations. She states that gender is not an issue for her, but for others it is. The past is a crucial ingredient for creating the present and even the future, which is another lesson that can be drawn from the Baines case. This supports the premise that "one cannot know where he or she is going unless he or she knows where he or she has been." The review of Bain’s past, beginning with its founding fathers, is extremely beneficial to the company's current success and sheds insight on the company's future. Additionally, the case teaches us the importance of organizational culture, values, and principles. These values have greatly aided Bain's recovery from financial issues and subsequent expansion strategy. The instance also teaches about the significance of customer service. In fact, it highlights dedicated customer service as the key to corporate success, particularly in the consulting industry.

Reference

Reviewed case Bain – Turnaround of a near-death consulting company

[supanova question]

Strategic Management And Strategic Formulation By Primack Company My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

Leadership styles and methods have evolved over time. In the past, leadership was viewed as the capacity of an individual to exert control over a group of individuals. In ancient times, leaders played a stronger role in decision-making. However, as a result of the changes experienced by the group's individuals, the society has also evolved. Leaders will continue to be leaders, but his decisions will no longer be the primary basis for the group, as the importance of each member's involvement in the decision-making process is acknowledged (Luissier and Achua 2001).

Believing that every member of the group is essential to achieving the group's goals, leadership becomes more of an affiliation inside the group than a singular function. The neighborhood and even the nation as a whole are employing various leadership styles. Each department has an assigned leader who anticipates the achievement of predetermined objectives. However, this participation can be expressed in several ways (Luissier and Achua 2001).

Leadership: Its meaning and importance

The success of a group is greatly reliant on its leaders, specifically on their capacity for effective leadership. Frequently, exemplary leaders have a profound effect on the lives and futures of everyone.

Leadership is described as the process by which an individual encourages a group of individuals to achieve the highest level of achievement and to achieve the common objective. (Bolden 2004). According to a different definition, leadership is a process as opposed to an event. Situational shifts can influence the roles and behaviors of leaders and their followers. Leaders are frequently viewed as respectable, influential, and accountable role models for every follower. Although there may be issues with the notion of leadership, there are still characteristics that make a leader effective. Williams (2005) listed seven leadership characteristics. These are covered in detail below:

Vision

Young or old, every individual has his or her own perspective, regardless of what society dictates. A vision is a dream of what a person aspires to be, be it a certain level of accomplishment in his life. This vision can only be realized if every team member strives and competes for it. The leader and aspiring leaders should understand how to inspire everyone to have a goal and pursue it for the remainder of their lives until it is realized (Williams, 2005).

Communication

The developed vision must be conveyed to the team in a straightforward manner. To obtain the desired outcome in every activity, this must be done in a convincing and efficient manner. Communication is an essential aspect in achieving vision and objectives. Early development of excellent communication can enhance people's self-assurance and communication abilities (Williams, 2005).

People skills

A decent and effective communication talent is simply one component; the relationship with the people around you is what makes it truly exceptional. When an adult faces obstacles in life, he assumes responsibility for building bridges. Motivating, resolving conflicts, listening, affirming, praising, and building community are just a few of the people skills that every individual must possess in order to deal with the people they encounter on a daily basis — people who may in the future serve as an inspiration to build dreams and accomplish goals (Williams, 2005).

Character

At its best, character always counts. People are more likely to follow and admire a leader whose character is consistent with both himself and his constituents. According to John Maxwell, "people buy into the leader before they buy into the leader's vision." ” This simply indicates that people are more drawn to a leader's ability to depict himself in front of the people than to his vision, mission, and goals. Therefore, leaders should remember that positive character attributes such as a strong work ethic, humility, honesty, integrity, personal responsibility, social duty, self-discipline, courage, kindness, fairness, tolerance, and respect for others can foster relationships and gain respect (Williams, 2005).

Competence

The competency of a leader should go hand in hand with his or her character. From the root word compete; a leader with this trait will undoubtedly succeed since he maintains an optimistic attitude on life. In a group or team with such a leader, it is never a doubt whether or not they will win. Competence, on the other hand, derives from experience (a track record of success), understanding how to delegate, and addressing every work with a commitment to perfection (Williams, 2005).

Boldness

Boldness is being daring. It is comparable to the willingness to take chances in any situation, even if they may not lead to a positive outcome, in order to pursue one's goals. If a leader is courageous, he is willing to take risks to guarantee that his goals and vision are realized. This is sometimes a tough attribute to acquire, but once acquired, it is valuable. Leaders must overcome shyness, timidity, and a tendency to play it safe in order to be courageous, risk-taking, and daring (Williams, 2005).

Servanthood

A good leader is a good follower as well. True leadership is not about being "the boss," but rather about serving others. Everyone should be taught how to be modest and not boast about their possessions in any way possible. Instead, teach them that being a leader is not an opportunity to be conceited, but rather a constant task to serve and encourage every person (Williams, 2005).

Manifestly, President Obama possesses the qualities of a capable and promising leader. He has an insight. He is aware of his goals for the nation, the American people, and the world. And he is aware of the route.

President Obama communicates well. He goes out to the people, whether or not they are Americans. He communicates with the surrounding nations. He communicates his visions and expresses his devotion to reaching his objectives.

President Obama has exceptional people skills. He would not be in his current position if not for his exceptional interpersonal skills. In the few time he has served as president, he has already demonstrated that he is truly for and of the people.

The character of President Obama has not been compromised in any manner. Yes, he may have admitted to engaging in some adolescent acts in the past, but they are truly in the past at this point. These actions are typical for adolescents, and any teen would have participated in them. But what counts most is that he has changed and become a role model, not only for his family but also for the many people he has known.

Finally, we cannot deny that President Obama is capable and courageous. He has the necessary expertise and experience to be an effective nation's leader. He has the courage to run for president despite his race and skin color. And he will continue to be courageous in his efforts to improve the nation and the planet.

Leadership by President Obama

Mills (2005) noted succinctly that "leadership is about a vision of the future and the ability to inspire others to pursue it, whereas management is about achieving results, and if done effectively and efficiently, it will be successful."

A good leader should possess the qualities necessary to meet the expectations of the people. Some of these are work-related passions. He enjoys his work and does not care about the compensation. A strong leader must be determined. This type of leader is sought by employees for managing business concerns (Leadership Styles 2006).

There are numerous styles utilized for guiding a team or an individual. This is determined by the people's norms and customs, values, beliefs, and preferences. In the United States, leadership styles are more diverse than in Asia (Leadership Styles, 2006). There are now seven prevalent leadership styles: charismatic leadership, participative leadership, situational leadership, transactional leadership, transformational leadership, the quiet leader, and servant leadership.

Clearly, President Obama has been utilizing a variety of leadership styles. From the very outset, it is evident that he possesses exceptional charisma and charm. His charisma and elegance become his primary means of persuasion. These are the exact attributes charismatic leaders exhibit. President Obama demonstrates, as expected, concern for those around him. He approaches the individual and speaks with them individually. This is his approach of getting to know his people and ensuring that their expectations are satisfied.

Obama has also demonstrated that he is a transformational leader. Transformational leaders are comparable to charismatic leaders, but are more focused on infusing everything with passion and vigor. Additionally, it is people-centered in that it is designed to generate a vision for the people and will cultivate future leaders. They are constantly visible, fight for all rights, and let everyone know they have something to say (Pason, 2003). Despite criticism, President Obama strives to complete his programs successfully and will not be deterred by obstacles along the road because they will lead to a desired outcome. As with many transformational leaders, it is evident that President Obama is people-focused and believes that commitment is a fundamental to success.

He is also a participative leader, as he always incorporates others in the process, which is another leadership style he demonstrates. Participatory leadership is sometimes referred to as consultation, empowerment, shared decision-making, democratic leadership, Management By Objective (MBO), and power sharing (Bolden 2004). President Obama does not typically make decisions alone. Typically, he contacts his subordinates (secretaries, senators, etc.) to discuss problems requiring decision-making, depending on the significance of the decision-making.

Reference List

"Leadership – Theory, Application, & Skill Development" by Lussier & Achua (2001). South-Western University Press.

Bolden, R 2004. What is management? Leadership SouthWest Research Report 1, University of Exter Center for Leadership Studies, Internet resource.

The Healing Dimensions of People-Plant Relations, edited by M. Francis, P. Lindsey, and J.S. Rice. University of California, Center for Design Research, Davis, California.

Leadership Styles. Web in 2006.

The Sixth Great Extinction: Patterns of Life and the Future of Humanity, by R. Leakey and R. Lewin. Doubleday, New York

Image Management in a Dynamic Business Environment. [online] Web.

McNamara, C. (ed.) 2006. Organizational Life-Cycles and Management Styles: Based on the Book "Barbarians to Bureaucrats" by L. Miller. New York: C.N. Potter.

How Are Asian and American Leadership Styles Distinct?, Web.

"Corporate Image as an Impression Formation Process: Prioritizing Personal, Organizational, and Environmental Audience Factors," Moffit & Williams (1997). 9:4 Journal of Public Relations Research

Pason, Amy. 2003. September 1. "Developing leaders through new models: leadership levels" Education for Business Journal

Reh, F. John. "Management 101: Your Guide to Management." The New York Times Company Web site, 2006.

Learning unlimited: Practical ideas and approaches for revolutionizing workplace learning. Business and Professional Publishing, Sydney, Australia, 1994.

Spencer, C. (1996). Mentoring made easy: a practical handbook for managers. Sydney, Australia: New South Wales Government Publication, Office of the Director of Equal Opportunity in Public Employment.

Torbert, M., & Schnieder, L.B. (1986). Positive multicultural engagement through the use of lowly arranged games. 57(7), 40-44. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance.

Wachtel, J.M., and D.J. Veale. "Coaching and mentoring at Coca-Cola Foods." Training and Management Development Methods, Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 901-904, 1998.

"Unlocking the potential of your organization: An overview of the Standard framework" 2004, Web.

Wallis, K. (1998). Mentoring: Leveraging knowledge and experience. 15-18 in Training and Development in Australia, Volume 25, Issue 5

Watson, S.R. (1993). "The position of universities in management education." Journal of General Management, Vol.19, No.2, pp. 14-42.

William Williams (2005). "Seven Keys to Unlocking Leadership Capabilities" Coaching Your Children to Become Leaders: The Secrets to Unlocking Their Potential.

Worrall, L., and C. Cooper. "Management skills development: A perspective on contemporary issues and setting the future agenda."

”, Leadership and Organization Development Journal, volume 22, number 1, pages 34-39.

[supanova question]

Strategic Management And Strategic Formulation By Primack Company My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

Leadership styles and methods have evolved over time. In the past, leadership was viewed as the capacity of an individual to exert control over a group of individuals. In ancient times, leaders played a stronger role in decision-making. However, as a result of the changes experienced by the group's individuals, the society has also evolved. Leaders will continue to be leaders, but his decisions will no longer be the primary basis for the group, as the importance of each member's involvement in the decision-making process is acknowledged (Luissier and Achua 2001).

Believing that every member of the group is essential to achieving the group's goals, leadership becomes more of an affiliation inside the group than a singular function. The neighborhood and even the nation as a whole are employing various leadership styles. Each department has an assigned leader who anticipates the achievement of predetermined objectives. However, this participation can be expressed in several ways (Luissier and Achua 2001).

Leadership: Its meaning and importance

The success of a group is greatly reliant on its leaders, specifically on their capacity for effective leadership. Frequently, exemplary leaders have a profound effect on the lives and futures of everyone.

Leadership is described as the process by which an individual encourages a group of individuals to achieve the highest level of achievement and to achieve the common objective. (Bolden 2004). According to a different definition, leadership is a process as opposed to an event. Situational shifts can influence the roles and behaviors of leaders and their followers. Leaders are frequently viewed as respectable, influential, and accountable role models for every follower. Although there may be issues with the notion of leadership, there are still characteristics that make a leader effective. Williams (2005) listed seven leadership characteristics. These are covered in detail below:

Vision

Young or old, every individual has his or her own perspective, regardless of what society dictates. A vision is a dream of what a person aspires to be, be it a certain level of accomplishment in his life. This vision can only be realized if every team member strives and competes for it. The leader and aspiring leaders should understand how to inspire everyone to have a goal and pursue it for the remainder of their lives until it is realized (Williams, 2005).

Communication

The developed vision must be conveyed to the team in a straightforward manner. To obtain the desired outcome in every activity, this must be done in a convincing and efficient manner. Communication is an essential aspect in achieving vision and objectives. Early development of excellent communication can enhance people's self-assurance and communication abilities (Williams, 2005).

People skills

A decent and effective communication talent is simply one component; the relationship with the people around you is what makes it truly exceptional. When an adult faces obstacles in life, he assumes responsibility for building bridges. Motivating, resolving conflicts, listening, affirming, praising, and building community are just a few of the people skills that every individual must possess in order to deal with the people they encounter on a daily basis — people who may in the future serve as an inspiration to build dreams and accomplish goals (Williams, 2005).

Character

At its best, character always counts. People are more likely to follow and admire a leader whose character is consistent with both himself and his constituents. According to John Maxwell, "people buy into the leader before they buy into the leader's vision." ” This simply indicates that people are more drawn to a leader's ability to depict himself in front of the people than to his vision, mission, and goals. Therefore, leaders should remember that positive character attributes such as a strong work ethic, humility, honesty, integrity, personal responsibility, social duty, self-discipline, courage, kindness, fairness, tolerance, and respect for others can foster relationships and gain respect (Williams, 2005).

Competence

The competency of a leader should go hand in hand with his or her character. From the root word compete; a leader with this trait will undoubtedly succeed since he maintains an optimistic attitude on life. In a group or team with such a leader, it is never a doubt whether or not they will win. Competence, on the other hand, derives from experience (a track record of success), understanding how to delegate, and addressing every work with a commitment to perfection (Williams, 2005).

Boldness

Boldness is being daring. It is comparable to the willingness to take chances in any situation, even if they may not lead to a positive outcome, in order to pursue one's goals. If a leader is courageous, he is willing to take risks to guarantee that his goals and vision are realized. This is sometimes a tough attribute to acquire, but once acquired, it is valuable. Leaders must overcome shyness, timidity, and a tendency to play it safe in order to be courageous, risk-taking, and daring (Williams, 2005).

Servanthood

A good leader is a good follower as well. True leadership is not about being "the boss," but rather about serving others. Everyone should be taught how to be modest and not boast about their possessions in any way possible. Instead, teach them that being a leader is not an opportunity to be conceited, but rather a constant task to serve and encourage every person (Williams, 2005).

Manifestly, President Obama possesses the qualities of a capable and promising leader. He has an insight. He is aware of his goals for the nation, the American people, and the world. And he is aware of the route.

President Obama communicates well. He goes out to the people, whether or not they are Americans. He communicates with the surrounding nations. He communicates his visions and expresses his devotion to reaching his objectives.

President Obama has exceptional people skills. He would not be in his current position if not for his exceptional interpersonal skills. In the few time he has served as president, he has already demonstrated that he is truly for and of the people.

The character of President Obama has not been compromised in any manner. Yes, he may have admitted to engaging in some adolescent acts in the past, but they are truly in the past at this point. These actions are typical for adolescents, and any teen would have participated in them. But what counts most is that he has changed and become a role model, not only for his family but also for the many people he has known.

Finally, we cannot deny that President Obama is capable and courageous. He has the necessary expertise and experience to be an effective nation's leader. He has the courage to run for president despite his race and skin color. And he will continue to be courageous in his efforts to improve the nation and the planet.

Leadership by President Obama

Mills (2005) noted succinctly that "leadership is about a vision of the future and the ability to inspire others to pursue it, whereas management is about achieving results, and if done effectively and efficiently, it will be successful."

A good leader should possess the qualities necessary to meet the expectations of the people. Some of these are work-related passions. He enjoys his work and does not care about the compensation. A strong leader must be determined. This type of leader is sought by employees for managing business concerns (Leadership Styles 2006).

There are numerous styles utilized for guiding a team or an individual. This is determined by the people's norms and customs, values, beliefs, and preferences. In the United States, leadership styles are more diverse than in Asia (Leadership Styles, 2006). There are now seven prevalent leadership styles: charismatic leadership, participative leadership, situational leadership, transactional leadership, transformational leadership, the quiet leader, and servant leadership.

Clearly, President Obama has been utilizing a variety of leadership styles. From the very outset, it is evident that he possesses exceptional charisma and charm. His charisma and elegance become his primary means of persuasion. These are the exact attributes charismatic leaders exhibit. President Obama demonstrates, as expected, concern for those around him. He approaches the individual and speaks with them individually. This is his approach of getting to know his people and ensuring that their expectations are satisfied.

Obama has also demonstrated that he is a transformational leader. Transformational leaders are comparable to charismatic leaders, but are more focused on infusing everything with passion and vigor. Additionally, it is people-centered in that it is designed to generate a vision for the people and will cultivate future leaders. They are constantly visible, fight for all rights, and let everyone know they have something to say (Pason, 2003). Despite criticism, President Obama strives to complete his programs successfully and will not be deterred by obstacles along the road because they will lead to a desired outcome. As with many transformational leaders, it is evident that President Obama is people-focused and believes that commitment is a fundamental to success.

He is also a participative leader, as he always incorporates others in the process, which is another leadership style he demonstrates. Participatory leadership is sometimes referred to as consultation, empowerment, shared decision-making, democratic leadership, Management By Objective (MBO), and power sharing (Bolden 2004). President Obama does not typically make decisions alone. Typically, he contacts his subordinates (secretaries, senators, etc.) to discuss problems requiring decision-making, depending on the significance of the decision-making.

Reference List

"Leadership – Theory, Application, & Skill Development" by Lussier & Achua (2001). South-Western University Press.

Bolden, R 2004. What is management? Leadership SouthWest Research Report 1, University of Exter Center for Leadership Studies, Internet resource.

The Healing Dimensions of People-Plant Relations, edited by M. Francis, P. Lindsey, and J.S. Rice. University of California, Center for Design Research, Davis, California.

Leadership Styles. Web in 2006.

The Sixth Great Extinction: Patterns of Life and the Future of Humanity, by R. Leakey and R. Lewin. Doubleday, New York

Image Management in a Dynamic Business Environment. [online] Web.

McNamara, C. (ed.) 2006. Organizational Life-Cycles and Management Styles: Based on the Book "Barbarians to Bureaucrats" by L. Miller. New York: C.N. Potter.

How Are Asian and American Leadership Styles Distinct?, Web.

"Corporate Image as an Impression Formation Process: Prioritizing Personal, Organizational, and Environmental Audience Factors," Moffit & Williams (1997). 9:4 Journal of Public Relations Research

Pason, Amy. 2003. September 1. "Developing leaders through new models: leadership levels" Education for Business Journal

Reh, F. John. "Management 101: Your Guide to Management." The New York Times Company Web site, 2006.

Learning unlimited: Practical ideas and approaches for revolutionizing workplace learning. Business and Professional Publishing, Sydney, Australia, 1994.

Spencer, C. (1996). Mentoring made easy: a practical handbook for managers. Sydney, Australia: New South Wales Government Publication, Office of the Director of Equal Opportunity in Public Employment.

Torbert, M., & Schnieder, L.B. (1986). Positive multicultural engagement through the use of lowly arranged games. 57(7), 40-44. Journal of Physical Education, Recreation, and Dance.

Wachtel, J.M., and D.J. Veale. "Coaching and mentoring at Coca-Cola Foods." Training and Management Development Methods, Vol. 12, No. 1, pp. 901-904, 1998.

"Unlocking the potential of your organization: An overview of the Standard framework" 2004, Web.

Wallis, K. (1998). Mentoring: Leveraging knowledge and experience. 15-18 in Training and Development in Australia, Volume 25, Issue 5

Watson, S.R. (1993). "The position of universities in management education." Journal of General Management, Vol.19, No.2, pp. 14-42.

William Williams (2005). "Seven Keys to Unlocking Leadership Capabilities" Coaching Your Children to Become Leaders: The Secrets to Unlocking Their Potential.

Worrall, L., and C. Cooper. "Management skills development: A perspective on contemporary issues and setting the future agenda."

”, Leadership and Organization Development Journal, volume 22, number 1, pages 34-39.

[supanova question]

Principles Of Accounting My Assignment Essay Help

Corporate frauds have been occurring for centuries, resulting in a number of economic disasters, with the severity of fraud scandals growing daily. The United States and other first-world nations' legal policies, etc., have been increasingly stringent throughout time. Nevertheless, some prior scams were so well-planned and expertly carried out that even discovering them proved difficult.

As a result of many major business and accounting scandals, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was passed on July 30, 2002. This law is also referred to as SOX or Sarbox. Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002 is another name for it. Corporations such as Enron, Adelphia, WorldCom, Peregrine Systems, and Tyco International demonstrated the necessity for a new law to safeguard shareholders who lost millions when share values plummeted as a result of scandals involving these companies. In addition, these measures undermined investor faith in the national securities markets. Thus, Sarbox was created to safeguard shareholders and prevent corporate fraud.

The goal of this act is to provide improved benchmarks for all U.S.-based public business boards, accounting firms, and management. The eleven provisions of this Act address criminal penalties, corporate board task accountability, auditor independence, corporate governance, internal control evaluation, and financial state improvement.

In order to ensure the success of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the business community collaborated to develop rules for compliance. In accordance with this Act, a new quasi-public agency known as the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) was created. This corporation serves as auditors for all accounting companies and is responsible for their oversight, regulation, scrutiny, and discipline.

Although ethical training is one of the few measures that can be taken to prevent such circumstances in the future, it is not always effective. Such trainings would have no effect on a person whose core principles are unethical, as his thinking and planning will stay wicked. However, people with already-good values have these values reinforced by such sessions, which can be advantageous for them (Singleton, King, Messina & Turpen, 2003).

People who are uninterested are further upset by such sessions because, in their opinion, they consist of nothing but "fluff." Money is the motivation for their fraudulent activities, so they counterattack by claiming that the rich do not comprehend the plight of the impoverished and why it is necessary to engage in unethical behavior to survive. These actions, such as SOX, are essential for tracking performances and identifying any frauds committed in lieu of sessions, since people in need of money will go to any lengths to get additional wealth.

The balance sheet and income statement can be extremely valuable fraud detectors if they are carefully examined and, more crucially, if they are appropriately compared to statements from past years. When employees, typically in the finance and accounting departments, steal money for their own personal use, they typically conceal it by inflating or falsifying income statement expenses (Harrington, 2005). The easiest approach to accomplish this is to add this amount to the already-recorded expenses. This makes it extremely difficult to determine which amount was inflated in order to detect fraud.

However, if the income statement trends are compared to the prior year's expenses, any sudden and significant increase in expenses should be taken into account, unless one is aware of specific actions that may have caused the increase. For example, the salary for both years should be nearly identical unless approximately 10 additional employees are employed or some employees are promoted. If not, one should investigate why the sum has grown.

Second, cash on the balance sheet is typically the item with which frauds are perpetrated, because cash is the only record the company has and no other records, such as bank statements, are available. Therefore, a problem exists if the cash balance suddenly becomes either extremely large or extremely low. To deceive investors, individuals exaggerate it in order to make the company appear flourishing and profitable. Some individuals understate their profits in order to reduce their tax liability. Aside from that, employees who steal money typically take cash, thus a sudden decline in cash should also be investigated.

Typically, accounting ratios are utilized to determine the growth and decline of a company. There are a variety of ratios used for a variety of objectives, but there are also ratios that can be used specifically to detect fraudulent activity within an organization. According to a 2005 article by Cynthia Harrington, "The ratios measure sales growth, the quality of assets and gross margins, the progression of receivables versus sales, and the ratio of general and administrative expenses." Increases in receivables, gross margins, asset quality, sales growth, and accruals enhance the likelihood of profits manipulation. This indicates that the rapid, extremely pronounced, and observable variations in these components may indicate a problem with the records. The "Sales, General and Administrative Expenses Index" is one of the ratios that can be used to detect whether or not fraud is occurring: The equation is:

Since expansion of sales and selling expenses go hand in hand, there is a likelihood of fraud when sales are growing without a proportional increase in expenses. In other words, if the sales are increasing too quickly compared to the expenses, the production should be thoroughly inspected for any odd activity, as as sales and production increase, the cost of production/expenses should also increase. Thus, it is cause for concern if sales, general, and administrative expenses current year/sales current year is less than 0.50.

References

Formulas for detection: Analysis ratios for detecting financial statement fraud. Fraud Magazine. Web.

Singleton, T., King, B., Messina, F.M., and Turpen, R.A., and (2003) Do pro-ethical initiatives truly reduce fraud? The Corporate Journal.

[supanova question]

Corporate frauds have been occurring for centuries, resulting in a number of economic disasters, with the severity of fraud scandals growing daily. The United States and other first-world nations' legal policies, etc., have been increasingly stringent throughout time. Nevertheless, some prior scams were so well-planned and expertly carried out that even discovering them proved difficult.

As a result of many major business and accounting scandals, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 was passed on July 30, 2002. This law is also referred to as SOX or Sarbox. Public Company Accounting Reform and Investor Protection Act of 2002 is another name for it. Corporations such as Enron, Adelphia, WorldCom, Peregrine Systems, and Tyco International demonstrated the necessity for a new law to safeguard shareholders who lost millions when share values plummeted as a result of scandals involving these companies. In addition, these measures undermined investor faith in the national securities markets. Thus, Sarbox was created to safeguard shareholders and prevent corporate fraud.

The goal of this act is to provide improved benchmarks for all U.S.-based public business boards, accounting firms, and management. The eleven provisions of this Act address criminal penalties, corporate board task accountability, auditor independence, corporate governance, internal control evaluation, and financial state improvement.

In order to ensure the success of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the business community collaborated to develop rules for compliance. In accordance with this Act, a new quasi-public agency known as the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) was created. This corporation serves as auditors for all accounting companies and is responsible for their oversight, regulation, scrutiny, and discipline.

Although ethical training is one of the few measures that can be taken to prevent such circumstances in the future, it is not always effective. Such trainings would have no effect on a person whose core principles are unethical, as his thinking and planning will stay wicked. However, people with already-good values have these values reinforced by such sessions, which can be advantageous for them (Singleton, King, Messina & Turpen, 2003).

People who are uninterested are further upset by such sessions because, in their opinion, they consist of nothing but "fluff." Money is the motivation for their fraudulent activities, so they counterattack by claiming that the rich do not comprehend the plight of the impoverished and why it is necessary to engage in unethical behavior to survive. These actions, such as SOX, are essential for tracking performances and identifying any frauds committed in lieu of sessions, since people in need of money will go to any lengths to get additional wealth.

The balance sheet and income statement can be extremely valuable fraud detectors if they are carefully examined and, more crucially, if they are appropriately compared to statements from past years. When employees, typically in the finance and accounting departments, steal money for their own personal use, they typically conceal it by inflating or falsifying income statement expenses (Harrington, 2005). The easiest approach to accomplish this is to add this amount to the already-recorded expenses. This makes it extremely difficult to determine which amount was inflated in order to detect fraud.

However, if the income statement trends are compared to the prior year's expenses, any sudden and significant increase in expenses should be taken into account, unless one is aware of specific actions that may have caused the increase. For example, the salary for both years should be nearly identical unless approximately 10 additional employees are employed or some employees are promoted. If not, one should investigate why the sum has grown.

Second, cash on the balance sheet is typically the item with which frauds are perpetrated, because cash is the only record the company has and no other records, such as bank statements, are available. Therefore, a problem exists if the cash balance suddenly becomes either extremely large or extremely low. To deceive investors, individuals exaggerate it in order to make the company appear flourishing and profitable. Some individuals understate their profits in order to reduce their tax liability. Aside from that, employees who steal money typically take cash, thus a sudden decline in cash should also be investigated.

Typically, accounting ratios are utilized to determine the growth and decline of a company. There are a variety of ratios used for a variety of objectives, but there are also ratios that can be used specifically to detect fraudulent activity within an organization. According to a 2005 article by Cynthia Harrington, "The ratios measure sales growth, the quality of assets and gross margins, the progression of receivables versus sales, and the ratio of general and administrative expenses." Increases in receivables, gross margins, asset quality, sales growth, and accruals enhance the likelihood of profits manipulation. This indicates that the rapid, extremely pronounced, and observable variations in these components may indicate a problem with the records. The "Sales, General and Administrative Expenses Index" is one of the ratios that can be used to detect whether or not fraud is occurring: The equation is:

Since expansion of sales and selling expenses go hand in hand, there is a likelihood of fraud when sales are growing without a proportional increase in expenses. In other words, if the sales are increasing too quickly compared to the expenses, the production should be thoroughly inspected for any odd activity, as as sales and production increase, the cost of production/expenses should also increase. Thus, it is cause for concern if sales, general, and administrative expenses current year/sales current year is less than 0.50.

References

Formulas for detection: Analysis ratios for detecting financial statement fraud. Fraud Magazine. Web.

Singleton, T., King, B., Messina, F.M., and Turpen, R.A., and (2003) Do pro-ethical initiatives truly reduce fraud? The Corporate Journal.

[supanova question]

Google Employee Empowerment My Assignment Essay Help

Abstract

The research proposal evaluates Google's human resource management techniques. Google, being the world's biggest provider of Internet services and a multinational organization, employs a diverse range of specialists around the globe. Thus, the evaluation of HR treatment options is maintained in this paper. Google's management techniques and persistent advantages are compared to the fundamentals of effective human resource management. Specifically, this article covers employee motivation, human capital upkeep and development, strategic valuation, and knowledge asset support. The focus of the research design is the analysis of the professional literature on business management. The major progress-oriented methods adopted by Google's principal competitors, such as Amazon and Apple Inc., are examined. In this context, the modular mindset development idea is evaluated. In general, the qualitative method is applied to the investigation of the objective. Consequently, the study employs many structured sources to locate relevant material regarding human resources approaches on Google. The research result is dependent on data, hence the inductive method is utilized. The data are collected using the snowball sampling method to produce coherent and logical information.

The key benefits of using this strategy demonstrate the effectiveness of the innovative HR practice. The research constraints are reflected in the study's recommendations regarding the implementation of modular thinking. Primarily, the investigation imposes restrictions on persons who are unable of adhering to severe job conditions and rigorous mental regimens. In addition, the fundamental limits and obstacles that may impede method implementation are presented. The report concludes with an explanation of the personal implications and consequences of modular thinking for Google employees.

Background on the Organization and Employee Empowerment

Google Company is a multinational American firm specializing in Internet technologies and services. The company originated from a research project created by a group of Stanford undergraduates. In the context of a scholarly endeavor, the researchers created a search engine that connected individual webpages.

The global corporation is owned by American corporations, who attribute their success and production efficiency to the benefits of corporate cultures and human resource management skills (Huselid, Jackson, & Schuler, 2007). According to contemporary business ideas, HR empowerment has the upper hand in 21st century management (Lashley, 2012).

The winning approach of Google Corporation is based on the management's unwavering faith in every employee (Hersey & Blanchard, 2003). Thus, in one of his interviews, a senior vice president of Google's HR team, Laszlo Bock, stated that the company's effectiveness is built on the utilization of many communication channels and new ideas, which are offered by Google employees (He, 2013).

Literature Review

The entries cited in the study provide a consistent foundation for the deployment of a modular strategy. Specifically, a lot of press releases reflect the current stages of HR strategic thinking development and provide some information regarding the policies of competing businesses. The scientific journal articles such as Hersey & Blanchard's "Management of organizational behavior" (2003),

"Technical and strategic human resources management effectiveness as determinants of firm performance" by Huselid, Jackson, and Schuler (2007) serves as a foundation for HR treatment strategies in general. The business management literature, such as Paauwe's (2004) "HRM and performance: Achieving long-term viability," provides a foundation for the adoption of modular thinking.

In the press release titled "What is Google's human capital strategy?" Laszlo Bock, the head of people operations at Google, discusses the company's methods for finding the greatest personnel. Bock argues that Google is distinct from other organizations in the world because it grants its employees greater autonomy. Thus, Google employees actively participate in the decision-making process. Additionally, Bock writes about techniques of acquiring and retaining employees. In the article titled "Google's Innovation Secrets: Empowering Its Employees," Laura He discusses Google's tactics for encouraging employee achievement. The author states that the company develops a number of channels that facilitate the expression of ideas and efficient teamwork.

The book "Empowerment: HR Strategies for Service Excellence" by Lashley can be viewed as a practical and theoretical guide to the empowerment of individuals inside various businesses. The author presents information regarding the concept of empowerment and its psychological foundation. Lashley presents instances of practical employee empowerment solutions, like as empowerment through involvement, dedication, and participation. In the essay "How Google Became the Third-Most Valuable Company by Using People Analytics to Reinvent HR," John Sullivan explores Google's successful techniques. The author highlights that Google's activities are mostly associated with creativity and innovation. Therefore, the organization need effective human resource management. Google utilizes "data-based people management decisions" to choose and retain the best qualified personnel.

Management by Google versus Government Supervision

The global success of the company is frequently evaluated and discussed by business experts. In general, Google's key projects can be regarded through the lens of technology-related human resource management. In other words, it is lauded that the corporation, which focuses on technological breakthroughs, employs so-called automatic staff guidance. Depending on the nature of the management, the company administration may consider implementing the Module Mindset project, which would increase the level of automation and refine the processing of processes.

Google employees regard HR management practices to be superior than the fundamental notions of public administration and governmental oversight. First, it might be argued that subjective job associations frequently predetermine the relationships between government personnel and power structures. Moreover, the systems of public administration are exceedingly formal and employ a type of conspicuous supervision and order delivery management. In conclusion, the international relations of the world's governments are marked by a great deal of variation, since the platforms of authoritative principles are derived from contrasting constitutional provisions. For instance, situations that are deemed normal by European governments may be prohibited in the power systems of Asian states. In contrast, Google management is characterized by informality and loose communication techniques. Nonetheless, the corporation's management places a premium on precision and compliance in operational support matters. Therefore, each duty is delegated to the appropriate professional and completed routinely. Despite employing a system of global recruitment, the organization is able to align the uniform circumstances of HR management in regards to diversity. Therefore, Google Company is successful in adopting an optimal form of task processing that may be surpassed by the main governments of the world.

Statement of the Problem and Research Objectives

The problem statement that motivates the construction of a research design derives from the need to provide the most suitable HR treatment method. The research paper provides a detailed comparison of Google's respected HR rules, as well as an outline of Amazon and Apple's current policy tactics. Thus, it is asserted that Apple's so-called talent method and Amazon's cash-to-quit policy tend to outperform Google's strategic thinking. Therefore, the work's principal study objective is on the selection of an ideal HR treatment model that would improve the quality of Google's services. The relevance of the work is driven by the company's need to portray the brand as an exclusive Internet services hub. The strategic refurbishment would attract a variety of innovative personnel who would be eager to demonstrate their superior understanding of online space utilization and personal competence inside the organization. The research analysis concludes with a proposal for using the modular mentality method. The primary objective of the design is to provide a thorough understanding of the technique of modular HR training as well as the essential needs for modular job treatment.

Research Restrictions

The study article follows the structure of qualitative literature evaluation, which helps the growth of a modular mentality approach. Specifically, the proposed plan is evaluated against three fundamental skills that Google teams must acquire in order to implement modular thinking. Nonetheless, the study had some drawbacks. The inquiry focuses little on psychological implications of adopting a modular mindset. Thus, according to the experts, adopting such an approach pertains to an individual's intellect. Therefore, if the management does not assess the psychiatric skills of prospective employees, the workers may experience a variety of intellectual difficulties, such as memory problems, susceptibility to stress and sadness, etc. Therefore, the before deployment of a modular HR strategy necessitates a study of the negative consequences that may impede mental work. As a result of these medical verifications, the implementation of modular techniques would result in the exclusion of some population groups from the recruitment process. Thus, thorough medical exams, which would largely concentrate on a person's psychological abilities and mental state, might place restrictions on the HR treatment procedure. The refurbishment seeks to enhance the selection of available resources, hence enhancing operational services (McLean, 2005).

Research Methodology

The research study is qualitative in nature. The inquiry is based on a comprehensive analysis of business literature, which prioritizes and describes the main benefits of the advantageous HR approach. According to the methodology, the study assesses the existing HR strategies employed by the organization. Following this, the comparable strategies of the competing organizations are analyzed. Lastly, the research study differentiates the ideal technique to human resources management and evaluates the method's benefits.

Traditional HRM at Google

Google's traditional human resources management is founded on three fundamental ideas of employment optimization. First, it pertains to technological growth. Second, the general strategies incorporate psychological supervisory characteristics. Finally, traditional HRM focuses on the monetary processing of both employee accomplishments and benefits distribution.

The issue of technological advancement pertains to the intricate facilitation of Google's working surroundings. Consequently, one of the key responsibilities of the firm administration is to give the employees with the most recent technology, which may enhance the quality of information processing and help to the development of operational accomplishments. The element is natural, given that software tools are fundamental work requirements.

The platform of psychological influence on employees also plays an important part in HRM. Thus, Google's content managers and policymakers strive to implement both sustainable working conditions and an inspiring work environment. In particular, the word "trust" is included in every written contract signed by a new Google employee. It presupposes that the management of the company has a strong belief in every individual who accepts Google tasks and expects a loyal and trustworthy attitude in return from the employees (Manjoo, 2000).

The principle of monetary processing concludes with an explanation of the financial benefits that attract newly-arrived personnel. In particular, the company offers 18-week maternity and paternity leaves. In addition, the company guarantees financial security and 27 paid vacation days.

Strategic HRM and Assessment

The key tenet of Google's HRM strategy is a results-driven approach to work. Within the organization exists a strong conviction in the spirit of initiative and vitality. Accordingly, the corporation's strategic employee management focuses on the issue of achieving the most optimal and sustainable outcome through the application of the most advanced technologies. Critics of the organization are usually surprised by the fact that it is able to realize the potential of any newly-hired employee without paying much attention to his early training (Paauwe, 2004). Indeed, Google has recently implemented a four-day method to HRM that immerses a candidate in the company's working environment and evaluates his professional qualities based on complicated output calculations. Statistical data indicate that after the conclusion of the mini-trial, the applicants increase their own productivity by 15%. (Derose, 2013). Therefore, it can be stated that Google's working environment, along with its readily available resources and easy-to-learn capabilities, ensures rapid learning and adaptation to the company's dynamic.

After a brief training, candidates are transformed into "data machines." This trend is a significant component of strategic management. In other words, Google calculates the pertinent profitability statistics and analytical computations that direct the activity of its staff. Therefore, the work concepts of Google are sometimes regarded as very mechanical. As a result of the management's grading and processing of individual advancement rates, it is quite simple for the organization to predict the future outcomes of work productivity. Google therefore checks the skills of its employees in accordance with the fundamental requirements of the multinational corporation and its development. Therefore, Google's strategic human resource management focuses on work outputs and rely on their analytic qualities.

Human Capital Estimation

HRM's strategic strategy facilitates the preservation of human capital growth. Google, as a firm with knowledge-based facilities and predictions, seeks to hire the greatest employees to ensure the progression of work. The corporation uses the ideas of human capital management and development on three levels. First, the company has high expectations for prospects, who may become potential employees from the outset. It is asserted that Google has little interest in educating its employees, and that they should enter the organization as professionals. In addition, the company takes careful notice of the links between investments in human resource development and recruitment returns. Thus, each employee has a micromanager who tracks their accomplishments. If they do not undermine the initial investment, the employment decision is strengthened. Second, the organization employs an intelligent workforce distribution.

Thus, Google reassigns work responsibilities. It has been demonstrated that around 80% of corporate employees are successful if they accept new work types. Diversity and new challenges motivate individuals to perform better tasks. Therefore, the adoption of a human capital-friendly approach improves the quality of success development because it preserves the company's significant expertise and knowledge base. Lastly, the management of Google values the notion of continuous learning. This strategy supports the organization's human knowledge assets. Due to the company's innovation-driven nature and commitment to the creation of new Internet technologies on a daily basis, Google is accountable for ensuring that its employees acquire and expand their knowledge daily. In addition, the corporation embraces the concept that Google is a unique company whose human capital boasts remarkable, nearly supernatural capabilities. According to the HR manager of the company, "every day at Google should be equivalent to two days in a different environment" (Bock, 2011, para. 12).

The Evaluation of HR Strategies in Competing Businesses

Adopted in the realm of web services, the concept of strategic thinking in HR treatment is inextricably linked to progressive recruitment approaches, which suggest the development of high-tech capabilities. The trend can be proven by examining the HR initiatives adopted by Google's, Amazon's, and Apple's principal competitors. The leading company

Enterprise Risk Management Implementation Examples My Assignment Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Example of Effective Implementation Example of Ineffective Implementation Concluding Remarks References

Introduction

Today's business segment is a concept that is in a constant state of change, as a result of market and economic instability, as well as any social concern. As a result, many businesses, regardless of their scope and area of expertise, suffer from quick fluctuations in the local and global economies because they lack the ability to predict economic patterns. To acquire a better perspective on resource allocation in the event of a crisis, researchers have developed the enterprise risk management process (ERM). The concept serves as an umbrella word for a number of procedures and represents a framework established for firms that must be adhered to in order to derive substantial benefits from negative risk (Agarwal and Ansell). To achieve this, a business must be able to implement an agile framework capable of adjusting its variables in accordance with current market trends and socioeconomic requirements. In the following study, both a successful and unsuccessful implementation of the ERM will be examined, along with the underlying causes behind each outcome.

Successful Implementation Example

When discussing examples of EMR deployment inside an organization, the entire concept of success should be validated by quantitative outcomes. For the process of risk implementation, such criteria primarily consist of the qualitative impact on an average customer and the proportion of resource loss for each predicted scenario. In order to perform such an in-depth analysis, a corporation must possess a large quantity of primary data to assess and predict the likely consequence of a particular tragedy. Large corporations are the pioneers of management model integration due to their ability to implement a particular scenario in the shortest amount of time.

The present risk management policy of the Atlantic Group, one of the largest suppliers of goods in the world, is an example of a successful EMR implementation. External influences have a significant impact on the organization's climate because its top priority is securing trade agreements with countries around the globe. International conflicts, widening socioeconomic inequities between governments' earnings, and worldwide catastrophes such as pandemics necessarily affect the workflow pattern of an organization. In order to develop a flexible network of trade contacts, the Atlantic Group opted to use the ERM framework, following in the footsteps of big financial institutions (e.g., multinational banks) that regularly employ the model.

For instance, the company's branch in Kosovo, Serbia, used the following approach to adapt to ongoing armed conflicts and economic challenges (Barjaktarovi). Due to the company's capacity to manage risks at the local level, the likelihood of incurring financial losses has consequently lowered dramatically. In addition, the effectiveness of the subsequent reform might be judged by the number of CEOs and employees who are well-versed in risk management methods and the potential consequences of ignoring the positive parts of risk-taking in the organization.

Unfavorable Implementation Example

As was previously indicated, the vast majority of the ERM implementation rate is comprised of financial institutions, as they are daily exposed to the danger of resource loss. Therefore, companies must continually anticipate the potential of pattern modification in order to respond to the crisis in a way that is advantageous for the overall financial flow. It particularly pertains to the management of the banking sector, which is accountable for the money of all stakeholders and the entire state. However, the banking industry frequently confronts obstacles due to its failure to update the risk management model in a timely manner, hence failing to handle the current economic concerns. As a result, the ERM, despite being legally adopted, fails to achieve its objective of averting damage and making use of opportunities presented by the crisis.

The case study of the Islamic bank Arcapita and its management' conduct during the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 is a prime illustration of such an ineffective technique. In fact, corporate governance and risk management principles were used to the establishment of tears prior to the advent of the crisis. However, the framework of the crisis response plan was very limited because it was based solely on historical data and statistics. The risks of the bank's losses were assessed based on the company's average earnings over the preceding decades, meaning that in order to enhance or maintain the enterprise's solvency rate, a particular number of purchases had to be sold in a relatively short period of time (Alhammadi et al.). Arcapita built a resource-restricted model incapable of processing a fast risk response as a result, as opposed to an agile pattern of crisis management.

Conclusion

Considering the following instances of integrating enterprise risk management models into a company's structure, one might derive a number of key principles of effective model implementation. First and foremost, EDM is always about accurately forecasting the likely outcome, taking into account both internal and external elements of the workflow disruption. Second, it is necessary to create the adaptability of the case scenarios so that they are not dependent on specific variables; otherwise, the general concept of risk management would be broken. When adhering to these rules, a business has a strong probability of surviving a market crisis and remaining relevant.

Sources Cited

Agarwal, Ruchi, and Jake Ansell. “Strategic change in corporate risk management.” Strategic Change, vol. 25, no. 4, 2016, pp. 427-439.

Alhammadi, Salah, Simon Archer, and Mehmet Asutay. Case study of risk management and corporate governance shortcomings in Islamic banks. 2020 edition of the Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research.

Implementation of the ERM concept in Serbia: A comparative comparison of the real and financial sectors.

” Bankarstvo vol. 46, no. 2, 2017, pp. 50-67.

[supanova question]

Enterprise Risk Management Implementation Examples My Assignment Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Example of Effective Implementation Example of Ineffective Implementation Concluding Remarks References

Introduction

Today's business segment is a concept that is in a constant state of change, as a result of market and economic instability, as well as any social concern. As a result, many businesses, regardless of their scope and area of expertise, suffer from quick fluctuations in the local and global economies because they lack the ability to predict economic patterns. To acquire a better perspective on resource allocation in the event of a crisis, researchers have developed the enterprise risk management process (ERM). The concept serves as an umbrella word for a number of procedures and represents a framework established for firms that must be adhered to in order to derive substantial benefits from negative risk (Agarwal and Ansell). To achieve this, a business must be able to implement an agile framework capable of adjusting its variables in accordance with current market trends and socioeconomic requirements. In the following study, both a successful and unsuccessful implementation of the ERM will be examined, along with the underlying causes behind each outcome.

Successful Implementation Example

When discussing examples of EMR deployment inside an organization, the entire concept of success should be validated by quantitative outcomes. For the process of risk implementation, such criteria primarily consist of the qualitative impact on an average customer and the proportion of resource loss for each predicted scenario. In order to perform such an in-depth analysis, a corporation must possess a large quantity of primary data to assess and predict the likely consequence of a particular tragedy. Large corporations are the pioneers of management model integration due to their ability to implement a particular scenario in the shortest amount of time.

The present risk management policy of the Atlantic Group, one of the largest suppliers of goods in the world, is an example of a successful EMR implementation. External influences have a significant impact on the organization's climate because its top priority is securing trade agreements with countries around the globe. International conflicts, widening socioeconomic inequities between governments' earnings, and worldwide catastrophes such as pandemics necessarily affect the workflow pattern of an organization. In order to develop a flexible network of trade contacts, the Atlantic Group opted to use the ERM framework, following in the footsteps of big financial institutions (e.g., multinational banks) that regularly employ the model.

For instance, the company's branch in Kosovo, Serbia, used the following approach to adapt to ongoing armed conflicts and economic challenges (Barjaktarovi). Due to the company's capacity to manage risks at the local level, the likelihood of incurring financial losses has consequently lowered dramatically. In addition, the effectiveness of the subsequent reform might be judged by the number of CEOs and employees who are well-versed in risk management methods and the potential consequences of ignoring the positive parts of risk-taking in the organization.

Unfavorable Implementation Example

As was previously indicated, the vast majority of the ERM implementation rate is comprised of financial institutions, as they are daily exposed to the danger of resource loss. Therefore, companies must continually anticipate the potential of pattern modification in order to respond to the crisis in a way that is advantageous for the overall financial flow. It particularly pertains to the management of the banking sector, which is accountable for the money of all stakeholders and the entire state. However, the banking industry frequently confronts obstacles due to its failure to update the risk management model in a timely manner, hence failing to handle the current economic concerns. As a result, the ERM, despite being legally adopted, fails to achieve its objective of averting damage and making use of opportunities presented by the crisis.

The case study of the Islamic bank Arcapita and its management' conduct during the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 is a prime illustration of such an ineffective technique. In fact, corporate governance and risk management principles were used to the establishment of tears prior to the advent of the crisis. However, the framework of the crisis response plan was very limited because it was based solely on historical data and statistics. The risks of the bank's losses were assessed based on the company's average earnings over the preceding decades, meaning that in order to enhance or maintain the enterprise's solvency rate, a particular number of purchases had to be sold in a relatively short period of time (Alhammadi et al.). Arcapita built a resource-restricted model incapable of processing a fast risk response as a result, as opposed to an agile pattern of crisis management.

Conclusion

Considering the following instances of integrating enterprise risk management models into a company's structure, one might derive a number of key principles of effective model implementation. First and foremost, EDM is always about accurately forecasting the likely outcome, taking into account both internal and external elements of the workflow disruption. Second, it is necessary to create the adaptability of the case scenarios so that they are not dependent on specific variables; otherwise, the general concept of risk management would be broken. When adhering to these rules, a business has a strong probability of surviving a market crisis and remaining relevant.

Sources Cited

Agarwal, Ruchi, and Jake Ansell. “Strategic change in corporate risk management.” Strategic Change, vol. 25, no. 4, 2016, pp. 427-439.

Alhammadi, Salah, Simon Archer, and Mehmet Asutay. Case study of risk management and corporate governance shortcomings in Islamic banks. 2020 edition of the Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research.

Implementation of the ERM concept in Serbia: A comparative comparison of the real and financial sectors.

” Bankarstvo vol. 46, no. 2, 2017, pp. 50-67.

[supanova question]

Schneider Electric Company’s Digital Transformation My Assignment Essay Help

Schneider is a European firm at the forefront of the digital transformation in industrial process automation and energy management in data centers, buildings, and infrastructure. It is a Fortune 500 company with operations in about one hundred countries. In a 2019 article published by Catalyst, Schneider Electric stated, "With a global presence in over 100 countries, Schneider is the undisputed leader in Power Management – Medium Voltage, Low Voltage, and Secure Power, as well as in Automation Systems." (para. 4). This demonstrates how far the firm has progressed in the electrical and digital systems business.

Schneider Electric's Digital Mastery Table

In a 2018 video, Cyril Perducat, Executive Vice President of IoT and Digital Offers at Schneider Electric, states that digital and leadership abilities are necessary for a successful digital transition.

Digital Skills

The digital skills exhibited by the workforce of Schneider Electric include ICT capabilities, data-driven decision making, receptivity to new technologies, and access to digital skills. The organization recruits a highly skilled and competent team. It conducts mentorship programs for inexperienced employees in order to improve their knowledge and abilities so they can fill open positions inside the organization (Karunakaran, Mooney, and Ross, 2015). Additionally, the organization is receptive to disruptive technologies that promise to address customer and production requirements.

Leadership Qualities

For the digital transformation to be effective, the leadership of the organization must exhibit the following characteristics:

should be open to learning new technologies, visionary, able to discover and embrace new opportunities, and should foster cooperation and coordination for digital transformation.

Team builders, business developers, project managers, software leaders, production leaders, and marketing leaders compose the leadership of Schneider Electric.

According to a specific paradigm presented in a 2018 paper by Capgemini Research Institute, Schneider can be classified as shown in Table 1.

Table 1: Schneider Electric Mastery of Digital

Category Explanation

Beginners

They demonstrate a limited command of digital and leadership skills.

Conservatives

They have leadership skills but lack digital competence.

Fashionistas

They demonstrate digital proficiency but lack leadership qualities.

Digital masters

They have an exceptional command of digital and leadership skills.

According to the table, novices have the lowest levels of digital and leadership abilities, but conservatives have more leadership skills than both beginners and fashionistas. The digital skills of fashionistas are superior to those of beginners and conservatives. A digital master has the highest advanced digital and leadership talents overall.

Matrix of Digital Transformation Maturity

According to Teichert (2019) research, digital maturity is the state of being fully prepared to meet client requirements. Digital transformation and digital maturity are sometimes used interchangeably, however digital maturity is a systematic approach to accomplishing digital transformation (Kane et al, 2017). It depicts a business' digital evolution (Chanias and Hess, 2016; Kane et al, 2017). A data transformation maturity matrix for Schneider Electric is a checklist of criteria for evaluating the perfection of its digital systems (Berghaus and Back, 2016). Literature demonstrates the effectiveness of Schneider Electric's digital transition by concentrating on the following parameters:

Digital Culture

The company is adaptable, which is a quality to consider. Implementing digital transformation in their business demonstrates that they are open to change. Schneider Electric states, "The client is the driving force behind this digital reinvention. No longer can a corporation develop technology in a vacuum; rather, it must utilize technological breakthroughs (e.g., IoT, AI, cloud, sensing, mobility) to drive customer-centric innovation and research and development (Schneider, n.d, para. 8).

It is evident that the corporation is interested in utilizing digitization to meet the demands and expectations of its customers. The company's management has also endeavored to foster an innovative culture by attracting "disruptors from both the existing workforce and innovative thinkers" (Schneider, n.d, para. 9). Innovative employees are able to provide customers with practical solutions to their needs.

Technology

Schneider has made significant strides in its digital transformation by developing software solutions that reduce maintenance costs and machine downtime. EcoStruxure Asset Advisor, Energy management, EcoStruxure Building Advisor, and Alarm Management are a few examples of the digital products they've created, although the list is not exhaustive. In addition to troubleshooting assistance and predictive analyses, the organization provides more essential services. In light of technology, Schneider Electric has therefore passed this criteria.

Digital Methodology

Teichert (2019) describes digital strategy implementation as enhancing business operations through the use of digital technologies. A digital strategy is the creation of software solutions such as EcoStruxure Asset Advisor and EcoStruxure Building Advisor to help users reduce maintenance costs and downtime issues by forecasting failure. The creation of Open Talent Market to connect employees with mentors and side projects was a strategy for retaining people and enhancing their job happiness.

Innovation

According to Techert (2019), innovation comprises the development of agile and adaptable features and customer-centric disruptive models. Schneider Electric has employed all of its inventive talents. Customer-centric innovations include the design and implementation of digital solutions such as Open Talent Market, EcoStruxure Asset Advisor, Energy management, EcoStruxure Building Advisor, and Alarm Management (Weill and Woerner, 2018).

The disruptive systems that were developed to deliver business solutions were the product of the workforce's creativity and inventiveness (Schuelke-Leech, 2018). The organization strives to maintain a professional staff by hiring, sourcing, or mentoring inexperienced employees for upcoming vacancies. These methods guarantee a sufficient labor force, the retention of qualified employees, and adequate succession planning (Shore, 2017; Zachary and Fischler, 2020). The end consequence is that the company's digital innovation maturity is well-structured.

Digital Disruption Technologies at Schneider Electric

According to Smith (2020), disruptive technology is an innovation that fundamentally alters the way in which businesses and industries operate. The characteristics of disruptive technology are sufficient to supplant current processes and habits. Despite the fact that digital transformation is formulated from a human perspective, the process is dependent on technological requirements that must work in concert to change business standards (Garmulewicz et al., 2018). SMAC, an abbreviation that stands for Social, Mobile, Analytics, and Cloud, is the collective term for the technology requirements.

Open Talent Market

Lawrence (2020) states that by 2020, over 47 percent of Schneider's workers had left the company, citing a lack of career advancement opportunities. The organization launched the Open Talent Market upon realizing that the traditional criteria for talent discovery, development, and advancement were failing. The Open Talent Market is an Artificial Intelligence (AI) program created to assist Schneider Electric's Human Resources division in assigning internal capabilities to the most deserved business roles (Lawrence, 2020).

The primary functions of this application are to match workers with unassigned tasks, assist them in acquiring a mentor, and connect them to supplementary initiatives. Employees are permitted to share any suitable private information with the system. As a result of these functionalities, employees feel more in charge of their careers.

Initially, the Human Resource department would physically pair mentors and mentees, which did not achieve the desired results (Lawrence, 2020). The introduction of the AI application revolutionized the entire procedure, and by December 2020, about 38,000 out of 75,000 employees will have registered with the system.

Already observable benefits of the application include a reduction in the need to fill vacant positions as a result of maximizing the use of internal talent (Haislip et al., 2020). Josh Bersin, a noted human resources industry expert, asserts, "Applying technology-driven solutions such as these is especially important for organizations undergoing digital transformation" (Lawrence, 2020, para. 8).

The analyst contends that digital transformation has made the organization project-based, necessitating software tools, and that the Open Talent Market is the ideal fulfillment of this concept.

Coffee Roaster Berto

Recently, Berto, an Indonesian coffee-processing company, has automated and digitized its processes. The company has implemented Schneider Electric's EcoStruxure Machine SCADA Expert for monitoring real-time production processes and Ecostruxure Machine Advisor, a cloud-based control panel that enables remote machine management.

The managers utilize a different software called Ecostruxure Augmented Operator Advisor to monitor the status of the equipment in real-time, cut maintenance expenses by fifty percent, and detect interference caused by Schneider Electric (2019). The general manager of the company is confident that this digital revolution will increase national coffee production.

Digital Transformation Journey of Schneider Electric

According to the 2019 Global Digital Transformation Report Buildings, the four key economic sectors of Schneider Electric, namely data center, buildings, infrastructure, and industry, have witnessed a significant transformation over time. The business value of buildings manifests itself through reduced energy usage, enhanced resident comfort, and streamlined operations.

Buildings' energy usage and carbon emissions have increased by around 36 percent and 39 percent, respectively. The IoT connectivity of apps that monitor light and temperature has made it easier to regulate light and temperature. Since then, resident contentment devoid of complaints has resulted. The management system of the building has streamlined process and maintenance concerns into a single control panel with real-time alerts and troubleshooting capabilities.

The running costs of data centers have risen due to the development and deployment of complex IT equipment for cooling and backup power. According to the analysis, cooling can account for almost forty percent of total costs. Song et al. (2015) found that the energy consumption of the ICT industry alone will increase to 20.9% by 2025, accounting for approximately 5.5% of world carbon emissions.

Schneider's analysis says that new data centers with cloud providers or edge locations have arisen and can operate twenty percent more quickly with modular architecture. (Garca-Herrero et al., 2017) China's Unicom cloud data centers have achieved nearly one hundred percent uptime while cutting total expenses by over thirty percent. The analysis found that the incorporation of technologies for monitoring, analytics, and real-time expert assistance lowered operational expenses.

Schneider Electric's industrial division has similarly reduced its operational expenses. Industrial IoT connects inventory to intelligent sensors in the distribution chain, making product movement cheaper, more efficient, and less complicated (Mazzei et al., 2020). Moreover, digitalized devices with their centralized record-keeping and real-time monitoring aid in the resolution of environmental and regulatory difficulties. Companies who implement strategic digital transformation have observed the results, according to the research.

For instance, the New Belgium Brewery in the United States has dramatically increased production by integrating intelligent sensors with a revolutionary automation system. Since then, machine efficiency has increased from 45% in 2017 to 60% in 2019, while machine downtime has decreased by over 50%. (Iacovone, Maloney, and Mckenzie, 2019). This narrative illustrates how digital transformation boosts efficiency by automating intricate production processes.

In the following years, the impact of digitizing infrastructure will be realized, according to the paper. This infrastructure will be used to transport people, products, and electricity around the world while addressing concerns about carbon emissions. Through smart grid technologies, the electric power business has embraced digitization. All smart grid components have been integrated under a central digital infrastructure (Siebel, 2017).

Once the smart grid connection is complete, it will respond dependably to dynamic environmental and load challenges (Yilmaz, Aksoz, and Saygin, 2018). In addition, the grid will create data for efficiency optimization, improve bidirectional current flow, and accelerate the transition to renewable energy. The smart grid will be better suited to handle population expansion and carbon emission reductions as a result of these advancements.

Conclusion

This case study examined the digital transformation of Schneider Electric, a multinational firm situated in Europe that specializes in the provision of energy and the automation of digital solutions in data centers, industries, infrastructure, and buildings. This study began by offering an overview of Schneider Electric's business and technological features before classifying the corporation in a digital mastery table based on digital novices, conservatives, fashionistas, and digital masters.

The report also analyzed the company's digital transformation maturity matrix, highlighting elements such as technology, digital culture, innovation, and digital strategy as determinants of a highly developed digital transformation technology.

This study examined Schneider Electric's disruptive technologies and elaborated on two technologies, Open Talent Market and Berto Coffee Roaster, which the firm has used to meet customer and production requirements. Finally, this case study investigated the company's digital transformation path and demonstrated the company's and its partners' digital transformation-driven accomplishments.

Bibliography

Stages in Digital Business Transformation: Results of an Empirical Maturity Study. In MCIS, 2016. (p. 22).

Institute for Capgemini Research (2018)

Understanding digital mastery today: Why digital transitions are so difficult for businesses. Web.

Catalyst. (2019). Case Study: Schneider Electric India: Attracting and Retaining Women. Web.

S. Chanias and T. Hess (2016), "How digital are we? Management Report/Institut für Wirtschaftsinformatik und Neue Medien, (2), pp. 1-14. Web.

EU–China Economic Relations until 2025. Garca-Herrero, A., Kwok, K.C., Xiangdong, L., Summers, T., & Yansheng, Z. The Royal Institute of International Affairs, Chatham House, Bruegel, the China Center for International Economic Exchanges (CCIEE), and the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Building a Common Future.

Garmulewicz, A., M. Holweg, H. Veldhuis, and A. Yang. 2018. "Disruptive technology as an enabler of the circular economy: what potential does 3D printing have?" California Management Review, 60(3), pp.112-132.

The influences of CEO IT skills and board-level technology committees on form 8-k disclosure timeliness. Journal of Information Systems, 34(2), pp. 167-185.

Improving Management with Individual and Group-Based Consulting: Results of a Randomized Experiment in Colombia. Iacovone, L., Maloney, W.F., and Mckenzie, D.J. (2019). This is the World Bank.

Accelerating Global Digital Platform Deployment Using the Cloud: A Case Study of Schneider Electric's "bridge Front Office" Program," Karunakaran, A., J. Mooney, and J.W. Ross, 2015. (No. 399). MIT Sloan Center for Information Systems Research Working Paper.

How one corporation utilized AI to change its talent pool. Web.

Mazzei, D., Baldi, G., Fantoni, G., Montelisciani, G., Pitasi, A., Ricci, L. and Rizzello, L. (2020) 'A Blockchain Tokenizer for Industrial IOT trustless applications', Future Generation Computer Systems, 105, pp. 432-445.

IoT Solutions: Accelerating the Digital Transformation with Microsoft and Schneider Electric. (2018). Web.

IoT EcoStruxure Ensures Efficiency at Berto Coffee Roaster – Schneider Electric (2019). Web.

Schuelke-Leech, B.A. (2018). "A model for understanding the magnitudes of disruptive technologies." Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 129, pp. 261-274.

The Impact of Mentorship: Why Organizations Should Develop Their Own Talent. Master's Essay. University of California, San Francisco

Why digital transformation is now the CEO's responsibility, McKinsey Quarterly, 4(3), pp. 1-7. Siebel, T.M. Web.

Song, Z., Zhang, X., and Eriksson, C. (2015). Evaluation of data center energy and cost savings. Energy Procedia, 75, 1255-1260.

Teichert, R. (2019). Digital transformation maturity: A thorough evaluation of the literature.

Weill, P. and Woerner, S., 2018. What Is Your Digital Business Model? : Six Questions to Help You Create the Enterprise of the Future The Harvard Business Review.

Yilmaz, E.N., Aksoz, A. and Saygin, A., 2018. An off-grid model of micro-smart grid connection for an asynchronous motor fed by a LUO converter. Electrical Engineering, volume 100, number 4, pages 2659 to 2666.

Zachary, L. J., & Fischler, L. A. (2020) ‘Those who lead, mentor’, T+D, 64(3), pp. 52–57.

[supanova question]

Borders Group Inc.’s Financial Analysis My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

Borders Group Inc. is a multinational corporation with its headquarters located in Ann Arbor, Michigan and registered in the United States. It focuses in the sale of magazines, CDs, DVDs, and books. During their undergraduate and graduate studies at the University of Michigan, Tom and Louis founded the company in 1971. After Barnes & Noble, Borders Group is the second largest international bookstore in the United States. As a result of the entry of new competitors into the U.S. market, borders has had a difficult time in recent years. Due to the current economic and financial crisis, customers must reduce their purchasing power to conform to the prevailing economic conditions. (Answers.com,2007).

Since 2005, the profitability of Borders has gradually declined. This has been related to excessive growth projects observed in 2006 and 2007. The administration has already decided to close some of its international and domestic stores. In a broader context, this is considered as a strategy to concentrate core company operations in the United States. The diminishing profitability has also been attributed to the underperformance of certain stores, including the sale of bookstores in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Borders recently sold its paper Chase company for $65 million to Pershing Square Capital management and its Ireland business of 42 outlets and 28 books for 20 million pounds to Equity Group Capital partners. (2009), Thomson Reuters.

The discontinued operations section of the income statement below reflects the losses experienced as a result of closing stores in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Other revenues include those obtained from franchising businesses in which Borders uses its brand name abroad. Australia and Ireland are significant examples. Borders group believes that their brand name has significant commercial potential that cannot be disregarded. I have access to this data because Dan Smith, the current chief administrative officer, has been a close friend of mine since 2004. (Answers.com,2007)

Borders Group is a corporation that values customer-centricity and originality. During the preceding period, the company established new systems that included the construction of a concept store; this included the introduction of destination business, which strategically differentiates the company's domestic superstores from those of its competitors. This section also highlighted the best coffee café and a paper chasing business that aims to increase sales to double its profitability. This resulted in a rise in short-term investments from $ 80 million to $ 108 million (Thomson Reuters,2009).

In the financial statement, the sum for goodwill represents the surplus value gained from the franchising operation. There has been no amortization for the years 2000 to 2008, as the world's focus on franchising businesses is anticipated to enhance goodwill. In 2006/2007, the amount for liabilities includes long-term borrowings. This was intended to alleviate the cash flow issues caused by the overexpansion of programs during the preceding two fiscal years. (Answers.com,2007).

The financial statements have been prepared following the United States' Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Consistent with International Financial Reporting Standards. (2009), Thomson Reuters Please consult the subsequent financial statements for additional analysis and comparisons.

Borders Group Statement of Income for the fiscal years 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008

Income Statement Annual Interim

Financial Data in U.S. Dollars

Values in Millions (Except for per share items)

2009 2008 2007 2006 2005

Date de fin de la période 01/31/2009 02/02/2008 03/03/2007 01/28/2006 01/23/2005

Period Length 52 Weeks 52 Weeks 52 Weeks 52 Weeks 52 Weeks

Source Stmt 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K

Stmt Origin Date 04/01/2009 04/01/2009 04/01/2009 04/14/2008 04/05/2006

Stmt Update Type Updated Reaffirmed Reaffirmed Reaffirmed Reclassified

Revenue 3,242.1 3,555.1 3,532.3 3,675.7 3,879.5

Total Other Revenues 33,3 42,3 37,1 41,4 51,9

Total Revenue 3,275.4 3,597.4 3,569.4 3,717.1 3,931.4

Total Cost of Revenue 2 484,8 2,668,3 2,615,7 2,650,4 2,812,4

Gross Profit 757.3 886.8 916.6

Total Selling/General/Administrative Expenses 826.00 910.00 887.90 891.40.00 895.10.00

Investigation & Development 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Depreciation/Amortization 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Interest Expense, Net Operating Income 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Unusual Expense (Income) 113.8 13.0 60.6 4.9 7.2

Total Other Operating Expenses 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0

Result of operations -149.2 4.1 5.2 170.4 216.7

Net Operating Interest Income (Expense), Non-Operating 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Gain (Loss) on Assets Sold 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Other, Internet 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Before-tax Income -154.5 -30.0 24.7 156.8 207.6

Total Income Tax: 30,2 -19,1 -2.8 60,3 75,7

After-tax Income -184.7 -19.9 -21.9 96.5 131.9

Minority Interest 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0

Investment In Affiliates 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

U.S. GAAP Adjustment 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Before Extra Items, Net Income -184.7 -19.9 -21.9 96.5 131.9

Total Unusual Merchandise -2.0 -137.5 -129.4 4.5 0.0

Terminated Operations

Profit net -186.7 -155.4 151.3 101.0 131.9

Total alterations to net income 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Preferred Dividends

Distributions made by General Partners

Weighted Basic Average Shares: 60,2 58,7 61,9 69,79 76,6

EPS Basic Excluding Unusual Items -3.07 -0.34 -0.35 1.38 1.72

Basic EPS Including Unusual Items -3,1 -2,68 -2,44 1,45 1,72

Average Weighted Diluted Shares 60,2 58,7 61,9 71,09 77,9

Excluding extraordinary items, diluted EPS was -3.07 -0.34 -0.35 1.36 1.69

EPS Diluted Including Unusual Items -3.0 -2.68 -2.44 1.42 1.69

Dividends per Share – Primary Issue Common Stock 0.0 0.41 0.41 0.37 0.33

Gross Dividends – Common Stock

Interest Expense, Supplemental 5.3 43.1 29.9 13.6 9.1

Depreciation, Supplemental 107.1 103.7 111.2 109.6 112.9

Adjusted EBITDA 71.7 120.8 177.0 284.9 336.8

Normalized EBIT – 35,4 17,1 65,8 225,9

Normalized Pretax Income -40.7% -26.0 35.9% 161.7

After-Taxes Normalized Income -110.73 -11.45 17.49 99.52 136.48

Available Normalized Common Income -110.73 -11.45 17.49 99.52 136.48

Normalized Basic EPS -1.84 -0.2

The Income statement

Financial data in U.S. Dollars

Values in Millions (Except for per share items)

2009 2008 2007 2006 2005

Date de fin de la période 01/31/2009 02/02/2008 03/03/2007 01/28/2006 01/23/2005

Source Stmt 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K 10-K

Stmt Origin Date 04/01/2009 04/01/2009 04/14/2008 04/05/2006 04/08/2005

Stmt Update Type Updated Reclassified Reclassified Reclassified Upgraded Upgraded

Assets

Short-Term Cash and Investments 53.6 58.5 108.6 81.6 340.2

 

Cash & Equivalents

Investments with a Short Term

Total Receivables, Net 102.4 103.5 128.7 150.3 118.3

Accounts Receivable – Net – Trade

Inventory Quantity: 915.2 1,242.0 1,347.3 1,405.9 1,308

Prepaid Expenses 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Total Other Current Assets 0.0 102.0 139.0 0.0

Total Current Assets 1,071.2 1,506.0 1,723.6 1,637.8 1,765.4

Total Net Property/Plant/Equipment 494.2 592.8 604.2 703.9 635.6

Goodwill, Net 0.2 40.5 40.3 124.5 128.6

Intangibles, Net 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Investing for the Long Term 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Receivable Notes — Long Term 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Total Other Long-Term Assets 43,4 163,4 253,0 99,2

Other Property, Total 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Total Assets 1,609.0 2,302.7 2,613.4 2,572.2 2,628.8

Liabilities and Equity of Shareholders

Accounts Payable

Payable/Accrued 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Accrued Expenses 279.8 321.6 336.9 293.4 306.4

Short-Term Debt/Notes Payable 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Current LT Debt/Capital Lease Port 329.8 548.6 502.0 207.1 141.2

Total Other Current Liabilities 34,1 85,7 195,0 150,3

Total Current Liabilities 993.7 1,467.8 1,595.9 1,311.1 1,196.0

Long-Term Debt Total: 6,4 5,4 5,2 5,4 55,8

Long Term Debt

Income Tax Deferred 0,0 0,0 0,0 0,0

Interest of the Minority 0.5 2.2 2.0 1.3 1.4

Total Additional Liabilities 345.8 350.4 368.3 326.6 286.7

Total Liabilities 1,346.4 1,825.8 1,971.4 1,644.4 1,539.9

Redeemable Preference Shares 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Preferred Stock – Non-Redeemable and Net 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

shares outstanding 186.9 184.0 175.5 294.3 525.1

Retained Profits (Accumulated Deficit) 63.8 250.5 438.0 614.5 539.0

Other Equity, Combined 11.9 42.4 28.5 19.0 24.8

Total Capitalization: 262,6 476,9 642,0 927,8 1,088.9

Total Obligations & Equity of Shareholders 1,609.0 2,302.7 2,613.4 2,572.2 2,628.8

Outstanding Common Shares Quantity 59.9 58.79 58.48 64.15 73.88

Outstanding Preferred Shares Quantity 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

List of Citations

Answers.com. (2007). Borders Group. Thomson Reuters's website. (2009). Borders Group Inc (MI): Statement of Financial Position.

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Southwest Airlines’ Business Policy Summary My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

The business now operates around five hundred thirty-seven Boeing. In addition, there are around 737 passenger planes. This allows Southwest to provide adequate and efficient service to approximately sixty-four cities. This is the case in around thirty-two states in the United States of America. In general, the organization focuses more on providing its services to consumers on an individual basis. This is contrary to the hub-and-spoke approach to client service (Peterson 2004). Additionally, the firm operates approximately 438 nonstop flights connecting locations. This indicates that around 78 percent of its clients fly nonstop, however in the majority of situations this is dependent on the customer's preference.

The corporation generally services and dominates short routes in the United States. The short routes have high frequency, resulting in more daily journeys. Occasionally, the company will substitute short excursions with medium or extended ones. This covers services even beyond the borders of North America. Approximately six hundred thirty-six miles is the average length of a company's journey or stage. This equates to an average duration of approximately two hours (Rob 1997-02-21).

Ownership of the business

The business is owned by its stockholders. The owners possess approximately 5 percent of the company's shares, while insiders hold 4 percent. With a float of 8.2%, approximately 8.2% of the shares are owned by institutional and mutual investors. Approximately three hundred eighty-three institutions own real shares in total (Drew and Scott 2008).

Marketing strategy

Southwest Airlines declared at the start of 2008 that it has enhanced its marketing strategy and launched financial derivative instruments. This suggests that Southwest Airlines can build a market niche by utilizing a marketing approach. This will result in their market dominance (World Airline Directory 1975). In addition, the corporation hoped to capitalize on the historically cheap cost of jet fuel by expanding its customer base. The company's decision proved to be a profitable one, and for a time, a profitable effort was sustained. The corporation was primarily concerned with reducing the tolerance of oil costs. Currently, they anticipated enormous profits from the surge in oil prices.

In 2009, the corporation accordingly raised its priorities for the second time. This time as a result of the anticipated increase in petroleum prices. These techniques helped the corporation maintain profitability during the oil fluctuations.

SWOT Analysis

This includes the analysis or evaluation of the internal and external environmental aspects of a business unit, which is a crucial part of the strategic implementation process. Internal business factors are referred to as strengths (S) or weaknesses (W), while external business factors are referred to as opportunities (O) or threats (T), generating the acronym SWOT. Analysis of a company's strategic environment is known as a SWOT or matrix analysis. Generally, a SWOT analysis or matrix provides a roadmap for reconciling a business's resources and talents with its marketing environment and local culture. The SWOT analysis is essential for marketing planning and resource allocation (Jan Y. 2002). Southwest Airlines's SWOT analysis is presented below.

Strengths

Southwest Airlines' strengths include its excellent and newly branded passenger services with a clear emphasis on the quality of the service provided, as well as its dependable and economically priced travel services. In addition to the effectiveness of service delivery, there are tried-and-true brands that have been tested prior to market-wide implementation. Taking into account the nature of a fund's brand and the quality of the market, favorable conditions exist for the aviation service business in the United States of America, resulting in the implementation of newly developed strategic initiatives. However, because the airline service provider is already established, there is a little amount of development risk. The aviation service business is expected to see favorable and low-risk developments during a brief period of time and duration. In addition, the unit cost is low because to the low cost of gasoline. Business modifications that are transferable due to the same trends and history of the aviation industry. In addition, the capacity to focus on brand and ideology while expanding through tourism and other market opportunities. In addition, there is less management risk as a result of the staff's experience and the significant diversity of talents and experience, which yields excellent results. Additionally, their services have significant gross profit margins, which can be maximized by negotiating bulk service delivery to travel agencies in their target markets.

Weaknesses

Southwest Airline Company has the following weaknesses: its reliance on ideology as shown in its services and goods is not patentable; this must be addressed by building a strong brand awareness and providing the potential of copyright for the full quality system. In addition to focusing on rapid expansion and securing a dominant share of the targeted markets, marketing logistics are considered through design and promotion, which also consider the breakeven outcomes for the trade at no additional expense. Central customer facilities are also being established to support the marketing strategy; permits for service delivery in virgin areas must be established prior to implementation in those areas; the product may be susceptible to deterioration over time due to industry competition, which can be mitigated by service product innovation and diversification.

Opportunities

Opportunities of southwest airline companies include niche-specific opportunities through monopolizing niche market by building strong brand/service awareness and leading in the service industry by being vigilant with other established business opportunities; low restriction to operating hours means there can be a diversity of destinations and access to a very diverse target customer destination; and capitalizing on the diversity of services and consumer groups to promote the company's brand.

Threats

Threatening situations for Southwest Airlines Company could include:

Government regulations concerning flight service industries may imply that permits secured have a minimum life period in different countries. Change in such an industry is slow; however, the rapid development of service products and brand will reduce a company's susceptibility to product imitation due to competition. Seasonal demand in the aviation service business results in unpredictable returns, which can be reduced through brand diversification and the provision of high-quality services.

Five-year growth strategy

A company's success depends more on its marketing approach. The more successful a business is, the more specific and unique its issues will be. Several service brands, on the other hand, fit into the strategic marketing process and are significant for all business organizations with the desire and capability to build market-focused concepts. The leveling of the business's design structure could be a major and strategic concept. This entails executing the expansion plan and growing market techniques, which may lead to the development of a valuable and capable supplement. On the other hand, exploration of strategically targeted business relationships and concurrent growth of stable and distinctive brands. This incorporates brand parity and recognition of the value of business-focused tactics. In addition to a business unit's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, there are more aspects to consider. This is because various external factors may alter southwest airline firms' strategic market planning. These aspects include (1) Politics and Legislation, as political unpredictability in the nations in which the corporation plans to develop its services can affect the unpredictability of its marketing planning. On the other hand, government regulations concerning issues such as taxation, environmental controls, subsidies and quotas regulations, and consumer legislation and regulations can have a significant impact on marketing planning; (2) Economy and Business Environment, which includes industrial or business growth capability, the different investment potentials, strategies, and positions, costs of providing the services and supply chains, diversification or capacity building changes on a global scale; and (3) Marketing Mix, which refers to the mix of marketing activities that a company employs to reach its target market. (3) Society, Demographics shifts and changes, wealth distribution, social mobility or distribution, institutions, education, schooling, lifestyle trends, how time is utilized, the attitudes of work, how people spend their leisure time, relationship of the business unit and the public(public reputation of the business in the eyes of the public), family, fashion, focus and interest development, and (4) the art or technological know-how, the rate of innovation. This factor, along with numerous others, may influence strategic expansion strategies.

Diversification of products and services is the first growth strategy; Southwest Airlines should diversify their products and services to attract a big number of clients from all cultures and walks of life. To enter the market without much difficulty, this should be executed with quality in mind. This diversification should also include additional revenue-generating avenues, notably gaming and leisure activities for its clients. By participating in multiple industries, Southwest Airlines will be able to rely on one segment of its business if another becomes less lucrative, especially during slow periods. Gaming and entertainment, as well as hotels, cater to distinct customer requirements (Johnson and Scholes 1993). This diversity does not guarantee success, but it does assist air service businesses in balancing their revenues among multiple business segments. Connecting with external public social networking services such as Facebook, MySpace, Linkedin, and Friendster is the second growth approach. This can be useful for advertising sales, marketing, and support tools. The services consist of extensive links between people who have formed organizations and social networks. People make relationships with others in the same network to create a large social group. These individuals connect in these networks and cultural communities to appreciate shared cultural activities and products. People create direct and viable ties with one another. People are able to connect with other network users with whom they have no direct link. People create their own norms and restrictions to engage in particular forms of social community network connections (Byars 1991).

Five-year tactical strategy

The five-year strategy should be based on entering the market as soon as possible, which would be accomplished by establishing firm stores in nearly all the finest locations where the likelihood of product consumption is ideally higher. The social network is integrated with a quality-assured market planning system that ensures quality management (Holt 2007). This can be taken into account during strategic planning, and as a result, Southwest Airlines' estimated profit will be 35%.

Effective strategic marketing communication distinguishes a corporation from its rivals. Marketing communication is crucial for determining the purchasing decisions of targeted consumers. Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) is the use of promotional tools to ensure that a consistent, clear, and precise marketing message is effectively transmitted to the target audience (Cooper 2000).

In marketing and advertisements, marketers frequently make comparisons to their products' or services' competitors (Leuser and Washburn 2007). Thus, displaying your product's distinct traits through comparison is frequently a very effective strategy, but it must be utilized with care. This is a common method for highlighting the differences between a company's brand and an existing brand.

Evaluation Procedure

If the plan is well-managed, it can bear fruit much sooner than five years. The major way of evaluation will be primary approaches. This will be accomplished by the distribution of questionnaires to customers at all company locations. This will also be accomplished over the Internet, with electronic forms easily accessible on the company's website and another prominent and regularly visited website. In addition, the physical will be accessible at all travel bureaus on and off the continent.

During implementation, sustainability management will also be incorporated. These accomplishments will be reported in a clear and factual manner to both employees and the wider public (Kotler 1998). However, the airline will face a number of obstacles on its path to achieving its goals. These include how to involve all employees in the implementation of the sustainability strategy, identify topics and forms of dialogue to strengthen cooperation with various stakeholder groups, and comprehend and promote social and ecological aspects as resource-friendly and efficient alternatives on supplier markets (Pearce and Robinson 2005). In order to promote its worldwide marketing strategy, southwest is presently establishing a formal presence in the market. The extensive range of planned and structured efforts for the other destination countries includes the formation of additional sales subsidiaries in those nations, particularly in Africa.

References

Byars, L. (1991). Strategic Management, Formulation, and Implementation – Concepts and Cases.

Cooper, L. (2000). Strategic marketing plan for fundamentally novel products. Journal of Marketing, 64(1):1-15.

Drew G. and Scott B. (2008), Records: Southwest Airlines operated "unsafe" aircraft. Web.

Volume 2 of Holt's Accounting, Finance, and Economics (2007).

2007 Volume 3: Business mathematics and statistics Holt, R. N., and C. Muller

A three-step matrix system for strategic marketing management. Intelligence and Planning, Volume 20, Issue 5, Pages 269-272, Jan Y.

Kotter, J., and Schlesinger, L. (1992). Developing alternatives for transformation. Business Review, pp.24-32.

Marketing Management: Analysis, Planning, Implementation, and Control, Ninth Edition, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1998.

Volume 1 of Leuser and Washburn's (2007) Management, ethics, information systems, and marketing.

Airlines Dive into Hot Water to Save Jet Fuel, Lunsford J. (2008). This is the Wall Street Journal.

Pearce J. and Robinson R. (2005), Strategic Management, Ninth Edition, McGraw-Hill, New York.

Peterson B. (2004). Inside jet Blue, the Newcomer that Revolutionized an Industry. Collection Hardcover. ISBN 1-59184-058-9

Competitive Advantage by Michael E. Porter, New York: Free Press, 1985

Rob K. (1997), Southwest may add cities to Iceland deal. Baltimore Business Journal. Web.

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New Principals Of The School Leadership My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

New principals and their leadership roles require extensive assistance in the early stages of their careers in order to adapt to the challenges of the position and emerge as effective school leaders. This literature review discusses the management training program designed to assist new school principals in their transition to their new posts. According to the Program for New Principals, the primary issues faced by new principals are leadership and the successful adoption of contemporary tactics in the provision of a more conducive teaching and learning environment. Accordingly, the new principals viewed the educational and motivational program as a positive addition to the orientation skill for new owners. New principals analyzed constructive motivating education leadership in depth and emphasized that it is an essential and distinctive structure of technological advancement.

However, the new principals cited modified support as one of the teaching style's most essential characteristics. In addition, they believed that the outcomes should update the hypothetical description of management training for incoming principals.

School leadership is the answer to school improvement; furthermore, new principals are cutting-edge organizers, the motivator of an educational institution by stimulating and demonstrating the way by conducting or leading; imposing direction on their team towards achieving an innovative success point.

In this new era of accountability, where school leaders are required to produce bottom-line results and use data to drive decisions, principals' expertise and experience are more important than ever (Hess and Kelly 2005).

Lately, the significance of strong leadership and management for the efficient running of schools and colleges has been recognized and acknowledged. The rise of self-management in many regions of the world has resulted in a more positive perception of the significance of managerial expertise in the educational sector for educational leaders.

Recently, there has been a growing recognition of the differences between leadership and management, as well as the necessity for school principals and senior staff to be both effective leaders and managers. The leadership characteristic encompasses concepts of vision, values, and transformative leadership.

In addition to this, competent management is a crucial requirement, but in certain nations educational leadership is considered to be even more essential. This study will examine the newly created role of chief educational leader in the community and tertiary institution. In accordance with this, the evaluation will also address the role of a new principle, since they are exceptional leaders in the educational sector who encourage and influence people, raise excitement, and increase or reinforce the best in individuals. Regardless of what leaders set out to do in an orderly or logical manner, whether it be establishing plans or assembling teams to carry out an activity, their success will depend on how they execute these tasks. Even if they do everything else right but fail to motivate emotions in the proper direction in this first attempt, nothing they do will succeed (Cranston, 2007).

In a context of accountability-based governance, the educational technique is meant to develop knowledge, skills, and competencies. The most important consequence of an educational program is for participants to be able to share and express their newly acquired leadership abilities in order to assist all organizations in enhancing their adaptability.

Particularly, schools can be bound to the traditions by which they run; hence, they can be easily influenced by their roots. However, a robust intellectual challenges or adversities ongoing education program that is interwoven throughout the organization's departments and service lines can provide the mechanism for continual learning and performance improvement.

Consequently, schools continue to apply the general concepts of school organization and conduct from an earlier period of development. Educational leaders or new principals must be familiar with the historical foundations and organizational structures that are more intimately tied to the cultural demands and expectations of a post-industrial society. New administrators or educational leaders in the twenty-first century should be aware that the schools they are responsible for are characterized by perpetual change or effective organization.

Typically, leadership in the educational sector entails planning and establishing objectives, supervising and controlling activities, and regulating and evaluating organizational and interpersonal skills. Good leaders also develop significant themes or a vision for the organization that others can rally around and identify with. They are able to balance the responsibilities of their own decision making with the engagement of others at all levels of an organization's decision making process.

Several recent works on school leadership emphasize other duties, roles, and traits of good leaders, many of which are a product of the contemporary political and social environment of education in general. Consequently, the rising diversity of students and families and the current economic developments are some of the most significant changes influencing our schools and school leaders or new principals. When the new principle or leaders are able to comprehend a school's structure, they are able to examine the functions, specialities, and interrelationships of the important structural components of a school district. In addition, they can align the objectives, purposes, and functions of school organizations with the larger cultural and societal objectives, norms, and values.

Problem statement

One of the most common issues faced by new principals in the educational structure is not merely the admission of new students, but also whether or not those students will reach their goals. However, by evaluating and emphasizing the vital and significant functions of good educational leadership, this article gives a foundation for understanding the fundamentals of running a smooth and effective administrative system and how to foster and handle student behavior issues. Therefore, a global leader should be widely accepted.

Meaning of educational administration

Educational management is a subject of study and practice concerned with the administration of educational institutions. There are numerous and varied conceptions of educational administration. The definition of educational management is "the administrator responsible for executing an agreed-upon plan of action." He distinguishes management from educational leadership, which "has at its core the responsibility of formulating an action plan and, where necessary, implementing organizational changes." Bolam added, "management is a set of activities aimed at being able to accomplish a task and capable of producing the desired result by utilizing the organization's available sources of aid or support in order to achieve the organization's goals."

Management studies are concerned with what occurs within and in relation to educational institutions' environments. For instance, the communities in which they are located and the administrative entities to which they are formally accountable. In other words, school and college administrators must encourage both internal and external participation in institutional leadership. When attempting to comprehend the different basics of a subject, the functions and objectives of school and college administration are universal. Some components of goal setting include:

the worth of the first anticipated outcome; whether the goals are those of the organization or an individual; the process through which the institution's goals are established.

Leadership in education: a description

There is no one definition of leadership, and Ellison, & Hayes (2006) contend that "individual bias can alter the understanding of leadership." As a basis for constructing a functioning definition, leadership dimensions can be articulated. The property of leadership refers to the shared traits and qualities of effective leaders. We defined leadership as a mode of thought, a spirit rooted in contexts that overlap: our own, that of the profession, and that of the educational process itself. In addition, they defined leadership as the interaction between leaders and followers. Aside from its cultural, gender, social class, or ethnic aspects, leadership is most characterized by its influence and identity.

In addition, educational leaders face the task of educating a growing and varied student population; they should be sensitive to the needs of kids and their families and implement teaching and learning practices that are beneficial for both students and their parents.

Leadership in terms of impact

A major component of many conceptions of educational leadership is the influencing process. Most descriptions of leadership in the educational sector suggest that it involves a social authority mechanism in which an individual (or group) uses deliberate leadership to manage the behaviors and relationships in an organization's workforce. (Ellison, & Hayes, 2006). The use of 'person' or 'group' emphasizes that teams as well as individuals can conduct leadership. Their definition demonstrates that the influence process is intentional in that it is designed to lead to specified outcomes: "leadership then refers to those who bend the motivations and actions of others towards achieving specific goals; it implies initiative and risk-taking." conceive of this effect as an organizational characteristic that permeates the diverse internal networks of organizations.

Leadership as a quality

Leadership in education may be regarded as 'influence,' but this conception is not prejudiced, as it does not explain or suggest what objectives or activities should be pursued through this process. However, many potential principles of the new main leadership role emphasize the importance of strong personal and professional values in leadership. The primary responsibility of any new principle or leader is to unite people around vital topics. It is also stated that leadership begins with the personality of the new principle or leaders, as reflected by their emotional condition, self-awareness, and sense of right and wrong (Hess, and Kelly. 2005).

Visionary leadership and management

Vision is increasingly regarded as an important characteristic of the new principal in relation to the function of good leadership and the need to draw on research expressing clarity of ideas and having general application about the new principal's leadership role, which relates directly to the vision of the new principal.

Exemplary leaders have a vision for their respective organizations. Vision must be articulated in a manner that guarantees the commitment of the organization's members. Vision communication requires meaning communication. Vision should be institutionalized in order for leadership to be successful.

Organizational Components and Organizational Structures

A second technique to conceiving of an organizational structure is to properly or exactly portray the organization's core elements. In respect to this, Ellison and Hayes (2006) highlighted three fundamental components of any organization's educational sector. This includes (a) the operational core, (b) the administrative component, and (c) support personnel.

The operational heart: The operating core consists of personnel who perform the organization's fundamental responsibilities. The administrative feature: The administrative component is divided into three sections: the strategic apex, the intermediate line, and the techno-structure. The strategic apex reflects or expresses the top administrators who ensure the organization's mission is carried out in a methodical or consistent manner. Consequently, the techno structure consists of administrators whose primary functions include planning and training. Support staffs: Support staffs are professionals who provide support services for the organization but function independently of the organization's operating progress (or rate of progress) in work being completed.

The following table depicts the Structural Constructs of educational or organizational Components.

Primary energy source General Response Type of Establishment Principal Aim Elites

Coercive Alienation Other Coercive Separation of officials from inferior informal leaders.

Remunerative Calculation Utilitarian Economic Mixed

Standard Commitment Culture Normative Cooperation between officials and informal leaders High degree of interdependence between leaders and subordinates.

Culture, leadership, and globalization

Leadership is a culturally and contextually enclosed activity, meaning that it cannot be separated from its larger surroundings — at corporate, local community, and societal levels. The cultural authority on leadership is characterized by multiple dimensions or facets that are frequently difficult to differentiate, delicate, and easy to overlook, despite being downplayed by some and ignored by others.

The objective is to emphasize the significance of the concept of societal culture to the development of theory, policy, and practice in educational leadership within an educational setting that is rapidly globalizing. Recognizing the connection between cultural and contextual motivation might contribute to the enhancement of its practice. 2007 (Darling-Hammond and Orphanos) leadership In light of the multiethnic nature of schools throughout the world, for instance, leaders are now responsible for creating their organizations in ways that appreciate and integrate diverse groups into successful learning communities for all. The effective leadership of such communities necessitates knowledge and abilities sensitive to ethnicity and multiculturalism.

Culture is plainly difficult and intricate to define. For instance, it is distinct from, but closely related to, society. In contrast to society, which is just the system of interrelationships between individuals, culture is the tie that binds people together via a shared knowledge of a distinctive way of life. Several fundamental concepts associated with the concept of culture can now be investigated in greater depth (Hess, and Kelly, 2005).

Multi-ethnic and multicultural

This word is used to indicate a school with a student/faculty profile comprised of more than one race. The term multicultural school refers to a school that is building a learning environment that adheres to multiculturalism's ultimate standard. This may include a school community structure that accommodates kids from diverse cultural backgrounds, a curriculum that effectively addresses issues of cultural diversity, and learning outcomes that reflect success for students from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Cross-cultural

This word is used to illustrate differences between two or more societal cultures. In light of recent advancements in international corporate management and cross-cultural psychology, we feel that culture provides a promising foundation for comparative research. By adopting a cultural viewpoint of leadership in the cultures, one can compare, for instance, the leadership of educational institutions in one country with that of another (Spiro et al. 2007).

As a result, globalization is viewed as a mental chain of events primarily influenced by a variety of political and economic factors. It affects all of our lives, altering our social processes and institutions as well as our relationships with one another. It appears that globalization, particularly its secular and materialistic aspects, is contributing to a less involved way of life for many individuals, particularly in the industrialized world.

While acknowledging that "leadership can be determined by culture," we must determine whether there are leader conducts, qualities, and customary of way operations that are generally accepted and capable of producing desired results across cultures as either contributing to or diminishing great leadership. The following studies identify six "global leader behaviors supported without question by shared knowledge and values" (Copland, & Knapp. 2006).

Charismatic/values-based leadership is characterized by a focus on the future, the ability to transfer heavenly influence on the mind and soul, a willingness to sacrifice much for the organization, integrity, firmness, and the ability to be flexible.

Management Principles: Organizational Structure My Assignment Essay Help

Company S.K.M Air Conditioning LLC

S.K.M. Air Conditioning L.L.C. is a prominent Middle Eastern company that specializes in the development of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning devices for indoor use. Significant technological and machinery advancements have allowed the company to grow from a manufacturing outsourcing company to one of the largest manufacturers in the Gulf region ("S.K.M. Company Profile," 2020). Air handling units, chillers, packaged air units, condensing, split, ornamental units, swimming pools, and ducted mini-split systems are the company's principal products. The company has more than fifteen hundred employees in eight different countries. Additionally, approximately 30 nations in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia receive its products.

Organization's Mission, Core Values, and Vision

Vision

"To grow internationally with competent products and employees to provide consistent quality and customer satisfaction"

The company's vision provides a feeling of direction and purpose for its business operations. Since its start, for instance, the company has been increasing its production facilities to fulfill the demands of its customer base. This has allowed the firm to evolve from a small business in a Sharjah industrial area to a globally-recognized manufacturing corporation.

Mission

"Complete Customer Satisfaction"

The company aspires to attain ultimate customer satisfaction by delivering top quality items to all of its consumers. In addition, it provides a line of products geared toward ensuring ideal indoor environmental quality.

Core Values

The organization lacks stated basic beliefs.

Slogan

"You name it …

We calm down" ("S.K.M. Business Profile, 2020")

The slogan is a concise summary of the company's mission. It informs consumers that the company can meet their residential and commercial cooling demands.

Importance of Social Accountability and Ethical Conduct in a Business

Business ethics are the moral principles that guide a company's decisions and actions. Various organizational functions, such as corporate governance, advertising, product safety and liability, pricing, and human resource procedures, are guided by ethics. Business ethics and social responsibility can assist a company in safeguarding the interests of key stakeholders, establishing a positive brand image, and increasing its profitability. Furthermore, moral behaviors play an essential role in preserving and maintaining the interests and rights of customers by preventing malpractices such as product adulteration, unfair pricing, and fake duplication. The right to safety, informed consent, and remedy belongs to consumers.

Compliance with consumer protection rules and regulations will help the protection of the health and safety of a company's clients. However, according to business ethicists, compliance with consumer protection regulations is distinct from organizational ethical conduct. A firm's adherence to regulatory statutes may be driven by apprehension of the consequences of breaching the legislation (Byars & Stanberry, 2018). In contrast, ethical compliance highlights the extent to which leaders can conduct themselves in the absence of the law. Consequently, an ethical organization will adopt and enforce rules that safeguard the rights and interests of consumers regardless of legal requirements.

Additionally, ethical conduct can safeguard the rights of employees within an organization. The law requires human resource managers to develop positive work environments through ethical leadership. It is expected that they will design policies that promote and improve fairness, justice, and equal treatment for all workers. Professional groups push for the elimination of unlawful discrimination and harassment in the workplace. Adherence to these ethical rules will foster a trustworthy and productive working environment for all employees of a company.

Social responsibility and ethical conduct can aid a corporation in fostering positive public relations and establishing a favorable brand identity. Toyota is an outstanding example of a company that has effectively cultivated a positive corporate image by engaging in fair and honest product pricing (Byars & Stanberry, 2018). In reaction to the public's impression that Japanese automobiles were low-priced and unreliable, Toyota chose to lower its prices in order to eliminate price discrimination against its U.S. customer base. This decision resulted in a long-lasting connection and public trust between the company and the people.

Social responsibility and ethical practices can also contribute to a company's profitability. Several factors can influence the profitability of a corporation, including its business management methods, the worth of its products or services, and its human capital, dedication, and productivity. Profitability cannot be assessed by short-term results, but rather by a balanced long-term profit maximization approach. Funding charity, investing in the social well-being of employees, and becoming green can increase customer and staff commitment, resulting in long-term business profits (Byars & Stanberry, 2018). The Merck Company is a well-known example of an organization whose social responsibility is profoundly rooted in ethics.

In 1970, Merck decided to produce a therapy for the treatment of River Blindness at no cost because millions of people with the disease could not afford the medication. Today, Merck Company is one of the world's largest pharmaceutical manufacturers (Byars & Stanberry, 2018). The organization's practices organically drew in devoted customers and stakeholders, which contributed to its success. A firm or organization that involves the public in its operations or affairs has a reciprocal duty to protect the public from any unethical practices. All businesses have an implicit social obligation to produce indirect or direct societal benefits. In the framework of achieving profitability, a business must generate wealth in a manner that contributes to society's welfare.

Importance of Effective Leadership to the Organization's Success

Leadership is a mix of talents, attitudes, and competences that may influence people in a sustainable manner. It is essential for achieving organizational results, effectiveness, and efficiency. The socioeconomic and political contexts of contemporary businesses are marked by instability. In order to increase the likelihood of survival in a highly competitive business environment, it is necessary for businesses to adapt to the quick changes. The intricacies of such dynamic surroundings need that a company be led through the changes by competent management. Successful leadership can contribute to the success of an organization via three mechanisms: effective change management, shaping organizational culture, and encouraging learning.

Manage Change Management

An crucial function of a leader is to initiate and oversee organizational transformation. Influential executives create a crystal-clear vision for their organizations and steer the workforce towards realizing it. Changes in an organization can occur at three levels: individual, team, and organizational (Hao, & Yazdanifard, 2015). The process outlined above includes identifying an area for improvement, creating a vision for the project, assisting employees in adjusting to the change, and sustaining the organization's established project (Hao & Yazdanifard, 2015). John Kotter designed an eight-step procedure for planning and implementing organizational change. Creating a sense of urgency for change, assembling a team that will spearhead the action plan, developing a vision, explaining the changes to employees, removing obstacles to change implementation, and lastly empowering employees by motivating little victories are the steps of the procedure.

To sustain the made changes, leaders must plan and conduct quality improvement programs to analyze the institution's success and impact on the changes. By consistently leading and managing this process, the leader will assist the company establish a competitive edge. The effectiveness and efficiency of a team inside an organization have a direct bearing on the organization's performance (Hao & Yazdanifard, 2015). The objective of a leader is to ensure that he or she promotes the success or achievement of the team by encouraging effective collaboration, communication, and teamwork. Individually, powerful managers can assist employees in optimizing their performance and contribution to the organization through capacity building. Transformational leaders, for instance, deploy intellectual stimulation tactics to push staff to dig into their creativity and independently address daily difficulties.

Shaping Organizational Culture

Employee behaviors are substantially influenced by organizational culture. It reflects the values, attitudes, behaviors, and standards of an organization's employees. According to Hao and Yazdanifard (2015), ineffective cultures are characterized by toxic work environments, interpersonal disputes, poor communication, and inefficient collaboration, all of which are detrimental to the organization. A weak company culture can lead to job discontent, low levels of staff commitment, and lower employee performance (Hao & Yazdanifard, 2015). A corporation can promote a healthy work environment and culture if its leaders has excellent leadership qualities. The kind of leadership actions in an organization will affect the work practices, perceptions, and attitudes of employees. The social control of workers' behaviour and beliefs inside an organization can be used to determine the effectiveness of the leadership within that business.

Facilitate Education and Professional Growth

Numerous research have demonstrated the correlation between professional progress and organizational results. Career development can increase job happiness, employee self-efficacy, motivation, and job performance, according to research (Mouro, 2018). Education level, abilities, and competences of a company's employees have an immediate impact on its performance. Complexity of processes and inventive approaches to organizational issues are related with a sophisticated skill set. Effective leadership in a company fosters and sustains staff expertise for the organization's maximum performance. (Mouro, 2018) Kolb's theory of experiential learning says that learning can be accomplished through experience, observation, experimentation, and abstract conceptualization. Therefore, leadership should foster an environment conducive to a culture of learning and the positive skill development of subordinates.

The Function of Management in Contemporary Organizations

Management is the application of positional power to secure employee compliance. Typically, leaders drive the organization towards the intended objective without requiring organizational participation. Managers are responsible for arranging production processes and amassing and allocating sufficient resources to guarantee the workforce meets its objectives. Henry Mintzberg grouped 10 management functions into three main categories: informational, interpersonal, and decisional (Toymasyan, 2017). Managers' interpersonal roles include those of figurehead, leader, and liaison. The figurehead is responsible for ceremonial and social duties, such as visiting dignitaries and attending events. The leader inspires and motivates employees by exercising authority. The liaison establishes linkages and interactions with other sources, such as trade and government groups and other firms' peers (Tovmasyan, 2017). Leaders' informational responsibilities include monitoring, dissemination, and communication. The monitor investigates the internal and external business environment. In addition, they evaluate business methods and procedures to determine the company's productivity.

The disseminator provides subordinates and superiors with information. The spokesperson serves as the organization's external spokesman. The third group, decisional jobs, involves making crucial company-wide decisions (Tovmasyan, 2017). For instance, the entrepreneur sets and controls conditions that facilitate the successful launch and execution of projects within the organization. A disturbance handler responds to disruptive demands and conflicts in the work environment. The resource allocator determines the type and amount of resources to allocate to each project. The negotiator manages crucial conversations within the organization's teams and between the business and external parties (Tovmasyan, 2017). Managerial tasks involving planning, organization, delegating, and motivating necessitate strong communication, decision-making, collaboration, and critical thinking skills.

Utilized Organizational Structure and Job Specialization

Mr. Abdul Karim Al Saleh, CEO of S.K.M. Company, is the administrative head of the company. He reports to the chairman of the Board of Directors and is accountable to all stakeholders and partners for the company's success ("S.K.M. Company Profile," 2020). The business adopted a divisional organizational structure since it is subdivided into divisions that operate in distinct geographical regions. In Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, each division manages its own commercial operations and resources. Despite geographical segregation, the divisions in Sharjah carry the brand name and identity of the parent firm.

The company's regional divisions established a departmental hierarchy for their organizational structure. The division manager is at the top of the hierarchy, followed by departmental managers and then general personnel. "S.K.M. Company Profile," 2020. Each geographical division consists of six primary departments: production, sales, marketing, business development, accounting and finance, and human resources and administration.

All personnel in the organization are committed to achieving their respective division's goals and operate within the areas listed above. These departments' leadership and administration are hierarchical; the organization's chain of command goes from top executive management to general personnel ("S.K.M. Company Profile," 2020). Each division's departmental leaders are subordinates who report to the CEO of the parent firm. In addition, each geographical division's staff are functionally organized according to their respective expertise. Each division's department heads have delegation authority and are responsible for defining the job design, tasks, and activities within their divisions.

Conclusion and Suggestion

A company's organizational structure helps establish the power hierarchy and job specialization inside the firm. S.K.M. Air Conditioning L.L.C. is a prominent Gulf-based manufacturer specializing in the production of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning goods. The organization has chosen the divisional organizational structure, which consists of geographical divisions led by managers. The section (company branches) assumes a hierarchical style of leadership and management, with the executive manager at the top and general employees at the bottom. Managers' responsibilities include leadership, monitoring, liaison, figurehead, disseminator, spokesperson, entrepreneur, and disruption management. In order to increase organizational performance and outcomes, the primary purpose of a leader is to facilitate learning and professional growth, build a favorable corporate culture, and drive organizational improvements. To improve organizational outcomes, managers should always employ critical thinking, communication, and decision-making abilities.

References

Byars, S. M., and K. Stanberry (2018). Openstax's business ethics module.

Hao, M. J., & Yazdanifard, R. (2015). How good leadership may support organizational change through innovation and improvement. 15(9), 1 – 5 in Global Journal of Management and Business Research (Administration and Management).

Mourão, L. (2018). Leadership's impact on the professional growth of subordinates. In S. D. Goker's edited volume, Leadership (pp. 124 – 138). IntechOpen.

Company profile of S.K.M: About us (2020). Air conditioning from SKM. Web.

Tovmasyan, G. (2017). Psychological dimensions of the managerial function in businesses. Business Ethics and Leadership, 1(3), 20 – 26. Web.

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Surf Mode: Entering The U.S. Market My Assignment Essay Help

Executive synopsis

Surf mode is an Australian company that specializes in the production and marketing of athletic apparel in Australia, Europe, and Asia, where it holds a dominant market share. The company has subsidiaries in London, Frankfurt, Tokyo, Shanghai, and New Delhi in addition to its primary manufacturing facilities in Sydney. There have been changes in the athletic arena as a consequence of the rising popularity of water sports, and this has resulted in greater competition among manufacturers as a result of the establishment of new sporting gear manufacturing companies and the expansion of existing ones. In an effort to maintain a competitive advantage, surf mode has created a revolutionary new surf ski that outperforms all existing surf skis and can be manufactured at a far lower cost, and has patented the ski along with the surf material. In an effort to expand the market, surf mode is eyeing the United States market; therefore, this research intends to demonstrate the various market entrance strategies and their applicability to surf mode's entry into the US market.

As a totally owned subsidiary is a component of the parent firm, it would be the greatest option for retaining full ownership of the invention. This strategy is costly due to the significant expenditures associated with establishing a fully functional subsidiary. When commodities are created outside the borders of the country in which they will be sold, exporting is a possibility. This is effective if manufacturing and transportation costs are low and export restrictions are negligible. In licensing, however, the surf mode could grant another company the right to produce surf skis for sale in the United States using the invention. As royalties, the licensee would pay the surf mode a specified amount of money. The owner of the invention surf mode is relieved of the direct financial risks associated with expanding the invention.

Introduction

Surf mode is an international company established in Sydney, Australia that designs, manufactures, distributes, and markets athletic equipment. Due to rising competition, the company has had difficulties and has needed to enter the American market.

The new surf ski model could not have arrived at a better time, so the company will use it to break into the American market. This research is based on a study conducted to discover the most cost-effective ways to enter the market while ensuring the company's success.

Since the Australian and American governments' trade is governed by the 2005 free trade agreement they signed, it was necessary to examine the ramifications of this on the expansion plan. A surf ski is an open-topped kayak that is controlled by a foot pedal. In terms of construction, they are a subset of kayaks and surfboards and are sometimes referred to as surf canoeing. They are paddled on water, particularly in warmer regions, but are also widespread in chilly regions.

Subsidiary

A totally owned subsidiary is a company that has all of its common shares owned by a single parent company. The subsidiary is directed by a different entity. For legal reasons, subsidiaries are given a different corporate identity from their parent firm. Subsidiaries are created because they provide various functions or provide different benefits to the parent company (Swiggart and Von Taube, n.d).

Starting up a subsidiary

The surf mode can enter the American market by establishing a wholly-owned company in the United States that handles the production and sale of the upgraded version of the surf ski it designed. This would be more time-consuming and resource-intensive than obtaining ownership of an existing company due to the expenditures of registering and constructing the company, as well as the difficulty of assembling the most qualified workforce. The subsidiary would likewise be unknown on the market, resulting in fierce competition as it attempts to establish itself (Swiggart and Von Taube, n.d).

The economy of the United States

As a result of the global economic collapse of recent years, the world's economies are currently battling to find solutions that will once again strengthen their economy. America is no exception in this regard. With debts totaling trillions, efforts to reduce the debt have led to the imposition of higher taxes on taxpayers, especially multinational corporations. As a result, operating expenses will rise, resulting in reduced returns on investment (Sullivan, 2010).

Australia and the United States are major trading partners whose trade relations are interdependent. The United States is the largest investor in Australia by volume, whereas Australia ranks tenth in the United States. The 2005 trade agreement between the two nations ties their investment and trade acts, hence facilitating surf mode's entry into the American market (Crescent, 2010).

Advantages and disadvantages of utilizing subsidiary

Creating subsidiaries is less expensive and less time-consuming for the parent company. For legal reasons, subsidiaries are given a different corporate identity from their parent firm.

Since subsidiaries are different legal entities from the parent company, the parent firm cannot be held accountable for subsidiary acts in the event that the endeavor proves to be a poor investment (Licensing vs. Manufacturing N.d)

A totally owned subsidiary is a division of the parent corporation, so the inventors have complete ownership over their creation.

Forming subsidiaries is a very costly method of expanding markets, and it entails a high degree of risk when dealing with new markets that are unfamiliar to the firm (Licensing vs. Manufacturing, n.d).

Exporting

Exporting is the sale of goods and services produced in one nation to other nations. Exporting is the legal movement of products and services from a country known as the country of origin to a country or countries known as the country or countries of destination.

When planning to begin exporting or grow exports to a new region, the company should be aware of the operational costs, rules and regulations, alternatives, distribution routes, and potential foreign markets (Palestinian American chamber of commerce, n.d).

For the surf mode to spread into the United States through exports, it must utilize the most convenient distribution methods. There are two methods of exporting: direct and indirect sales. In indirect sales, export management companies (EMC), export trading companies (ETC), and export/import merchants are utilized (Entrepreneur, 2010).

A domestic exporter seeks the services of the EMC, while the ETC conducts market research to discover what buyers are interested in and locates the producers who have the items and wish to deal. The import/export trader purchases merchandise and resells it as his own (Entrepreneur, 2010).

In direct selling, the producer participates in every transaction between production and consumption. He or she oversees all exportation efforts to ensure that the clients or consumers are well taken care of (Daley and Scott, 2000, p.19).

The pros and downsides of exporting surf skis to the United States.

Exportation saves resources that would have been required to establish subsidiaries or new businesses within the limits of the United States. The expenditures associated with establishing new businesses are extremely significant, necessitating the search for less expensive and more appropriate expansion alternatives (Rosales, 1993, p.2).

The advantages of big scale production will accrue to the business as a result of centralized production. The corporation can manufacture overseas, which allows it to base its operations in regions with lower labor and manufacturing costs and then export from there. If this offshore location is close to the United States, transportation expenses would be reduced (Rosales, 1993, p.2).

When the intended market can produce at a cheaper cost, exportation is not appropriate. This is because the models on the market will be significantly less expensive than the new model, and this may pose a difficulty for the export brand's establishment. Transportation expenses can render exported goods prohibitively expensive and therefore uneconomical, as can taxes and other export obstacles.

Licensing

Patents limit others from manufacturing, utilizing, and selling an invention. It therefore safeguards the inventor's right to be the only decision-maker about the use and use of the invention.

In licensing, an inventor sells the rights to his innovation to a manufacturer in exchange for royalties. This is especially advantageous to the innovator if he or she lacks the requisite skills, knowledge, and resources to develop the product, or if the inventor's direct production of the product may not be as cost-effective, necessitating the need to find a partnership elsewhere (Don Boshears, Boshears & Boshears Consulting, n.d).

The license permits the innovator to benefit from the manufacturer's agreement. In this instance, the surf mode firm owns all property rights because it holds patents on both the design and the shell material, making it the only owner of the design and the raw materials (Pedreira, 2010).

Exclusive or nonexclusive licensing is possible. In a nonexclusive license, the enterprise that invented the surf mode may enter into business agreements with many licensees. In the process of growing into the United States, several companies may be granted permission to manufacture and sell surf skis. Exclusive licensing, on the other hand, is the practice of licensing an innovation in which the scope of the rights surrendered is limited by the coverage area or the field of application. This means that the surf mode can license the idea to a business that will only sell surf skis in the United States, but that this does not prevent the company from licensing the technology to firms situated in other geographical regions, such as Europe, Africa, or Asia. Boshears &Boshears Consulting, n.d.

When licensing, surf mode may choose another firm that is strategically positioned and has the resources and capacity to manufacture and distribute the more advanced model of the surf ski. Due to higher transportation costs and the difficulties connected with exporting and importing in the form of obstacles and tariffs, surf mode may decide to develop a partnership with a company that is already located in the United States.

As stipulated in the contract, the license may be time- or region-limited, and when the time period expires, the rights to the invention revert to the inventor because the licensed patent rights are no longer valid (Pedreira, 2010; Lennon, 2008, p.53).

Positives and negatives of licensing

The surf mode would not be required to provide funds because the licensee is responsible for production risks and costs. This will safeguard the surf mode against market forces (Licensing vs. Manufacturing, N.d). When competition is high and the licensee is strategically positioned within the target industry and has a large market for its products, licensing may be more cost-effective (Licensing vs. Manufacturing, n.d).

Applicable if surf mode chooses not to manufacture the surf ski for legal, moral, or other reasons.

The disadvantages of licensing include the loss of control over the invention and poor inventor loyalty in relation to the manufacturer's gains.

Recommendations and summary

In order for surf mode to profit from its foray into the US market, it must export or establish a business there. This is because the United States is a trade partner of Australia, and the 2005 trade deal between the two countries allows for free commerce. This demonstrates that trade obstacles have been removed, improving competition and profitability.

The invention is of good quality and can be produced cost-effectively, resulting in decreased consumer pricing. The decrease in price will boost the surf ski's competitiveness versus versions from other manufacturers. This will increase demand, hence enhancing profitability.

Due to the exemptions granted to Australian corporations, the business is able to function without being hindered by the bottlenecks faced by overseas firms; consequently, the company's return on investment will increase. Therefore, it is recommended that the surf mode make and market their own surf skis in order to take advantage of the trade agreement.

References

(2010) Australia-United States free trade deal. Crescent, J. M. Web.

Daley, William M., and D. T. Scott (2000). A Guide to Exporting for Beginners Washington: Diane Publishing. Web.

Boshears Consulting & Don Boshears, B.

How to obtain a product license. Web.

Entrepreneur (2010). How to Establish an Import/Export Enterprise. Web.

Licensed versus manufactured. The advantages and downsides of deciding between licensing and manufacturing for your invention. Web.

Lennon, M. J. (2008). Drafting license agreements for technology patents. New York: Aspen Publishers Web.

Palestinian American business chamber Procedures for Import and Export with the United States. Web.

Pedreira, T. (2010). Licensing agreements. Web.

Rosales, M. A. (1993). Breaking into the trading game: A guide to exporting for small businesses. Web: Washington: DIANE Publishing

Sullivan, M. (2010). Fair or unjust? Web.

Corporate & international law: A Guide to Incorporating a United States Subsidiary. Swiggart, W. F. & Von Taube, A. Web.

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Eau Doux Company’s Professional Strategic Management My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

Eau Doux is an engineering firm specializing in the manufacturing of customized equipment for French water agencies. However, the company lacks the necessary engineering quality and management structure to address specific market challenges. The decision-making procedures are too streamlined to develop the necessary plan for a competitive edge. The board of directors' policy-making process was riddled with errors, which ultimately led to an acquisition. Fundamentally, management flaws have exposed the established company to the threat of product imitations and substitutes. The managerial structure is lacking in competence, professionalism, and creativity. The company, which has a “well-deserved reputation for bespoke production” of superior water equipment, is ultimately sold (Gold& Bratton, 2001). For the successful execution of boardroom decisions and resolutions, a transformational leadership style is required. Due to a lack of appropriate follow-up leadership, management, and oversight, the current state of affairs results in the loss of valuable ideas during the execution phase. To maximize the potential of its skilled and talented technical personnel, Eau Doux Company must embrace an entirely new paradigm in terms of management structure and organizational leadership style.

Henri Fayol Classical Management School

The Henri Fayol Classical School of Management describes the following managerial roles:

Planning, Organizing, Commanding, and Coordinating Performance Control

Henri Fayol's management philosophy specifies the following organizational planning fundamentals:

Division of labor-Specialization of labor increases job efficiency because individuals direct their efforts toward a common goal that matches their profile of abilities and skills. Authority and Accountability – Since managers have administrative control of power that demands obedience, authority is linked to responsibility. The intelligence, experience, and personality of those in positions of authority signify managerial authority (Gold& Bratton, 2001). Good discipline is vital to the operation of organizations. Managers are consequently responsible for the efficient implementation of projects and can punish disciplinary action against subordinates who deliberately violate an organization's guiding principles. According to the hierarchy of command in leadership, subordinates should only get commands from a single senior management in order to generate goal-oriented actions. Unity of direction-Organizations must have a central authority of reference and an extensive action plan for conducting their operations. Subordination of individual interest to the general interest – Organizational goals and objectives replace the individual interests of personnel (Lynch, 2010). Personnel compensation – Employees should be appropriately compensated for services done. Therefore, salaries should be equitable for both employees and employers. Centralization refers to the most efficient means of harnessing the potential of employees based on the organizational structure. Stability of people tenure – A stable workforce is required for the proper implementation of organizational procedures and the achievement of sustainable productivity. To ensure the effectiveness of the action plan, it is necessary to inspire initiative at all organizational levels. Therefore, motivation is derived from the desire to succeed and the initiative to advance. Teams with esprit de corps are vital to the commercial success of businesses. Through the effective exploitation of communication channels accessible to businesses, teamwork is fostered. In companies, managers and subordinates must coordinate their efforts towards common goals. Individual ambitions are superseded by group/team objectives (Mullins, 2008).

The Whittington School for the Classical Studies

The authors of the classical school of Whittington presume that rational managerial behavior exists and that profit maximization is the guiding principle for a business organization's whole strategic planning procedure. The company's external environment is regarded predictable and manageable (Woods& Adrian, 2001). The process of strategic planning is consequently aimed toward achieving a perfect environmental balance between available possibilities and resources. The strategic planning process is directed by lucid corporate objectives through the formulation and implementation of profitable strategies. Eau Doux Company is conducting research and development for the best monitoring and filtration products for water systems. However, the corporation lacks the requisite engineering quality and management structure to ensure the successful adoption of profit-maximizing initiatives. Porter suggests the “five forces” method for analyzing the competitive landscape.

Peril of Entry

Several factors, including "economies of scale, economics of scope, and capital requirement for entry, access to distribution channels, learning curve, and expected retaliation and differentiation," impact the entry of competitors into the market (Toth, Grunig& Grunig, 2007). In comparison to established competitors, a new entrant has low sales volume and considerable startup expenses. Large organizations with a massive capital base and centralized manufacturing units are better positioned to reap the benefits of economies of scale than small businesses together. Costs of operation and maintenance are comparable for all applicants. Access to distribution and marketing channels is another obstacle for newcomers.

The influence of purchasers

If products and services on the market are not differentiated, purchasing volumes are notably high, and there are few purchasers, then purchaser power is high. A greater demand for a limited supply of water equipment in France has led to an increase in pricing and a decline in purchasing volume. Taking into account both R&D and production expenses, the cost of producing water equipment is substantial. Since pricing regimes are regular and regulated, the maintenance section of the industry is more lucrative, prompting Eau Doux Company to convert from manufacturing water equipment to customizing parts manufactured by other firms.

Influence of suppliers

Few market suppliers result in high supplier power, whereas customer negotiating power decreases. The cost of switching from one supplier to another is also considerable due to the possibility of future supplier integration. Suppliers of bespoke parts tend to compete effectively with manufacturers of water equipment in France, such as Eau Doux. There is a lucrative existence of counterfeit items that provide clients water equipment at a lower price. Therefore, manufacturers of branded quality water systems are not benefiting from their costly capital investment in the research and production of durable water equipment (McCabe, 2010). Some manufacturers, such as the Eau Doux Company, have sustained enormous losses and have been obliged to replace their management twice in ten years. Mergers and acquisitions have rendered outdated the results of R&D interventions.

Threat of competition

The threat of replacements determines the market value of a company's products and services. Existing products may become obsolete or unnecessary upon the advent of product alternatives. The likelihood of customers migrating from a traditional product to a substitute depends on their opinions of the quality and value of both products. A substitute product's perceived high value makes it easy for customers to switch. The prospect of alternatives is imminent in France's competitive water equipment manufacturing business. The reputation of Eau Doux Company as a manufacturer of high-quality water systems and equipment is jeopardized by an economical and inexpensive imitation market. The company's investment in piecemeal R&D projects to build equipment that is resistant to imitation is a sham. The entire project, however, cannot be implemented due to the engineering department's ineffective management structure.

Competitive rivalry

In settings when the threat of entry is possible, either the strength of suppliers or purchasers is great, and the threat of substitutes is likely to challenge the market position of existing company products, market competition increases. As businesses aspire for market dominance, competition intensifies as well. The presence of numerous competitors results in an excess supply of goods and services. In markets where global consumers are prevalent, there is increased rivalry. France's markets for the production and distribution of monitoring equipment for waterways are competitive due to a parallel supply of counterfeit goods.

Background

Due to the counterfeiting problem, Eau Doux Company is compelled to relinquish its lucrative specialization in producing water equipment in order to concentrate on the modification of products manufactured by other companies. Eau Doux was pushed out of its niche market by rivals who specialized in the generic substitute of their unique products (Lynch, 2010). Despite this, management proposes engaging system design and water management specialists in order to create a product line that cannot be pirated. The successful academic team is able to create a centralized water quality monitoring system that might be utilized to check the physical and biological cleanliness of water up to 100 miles away. This inventive concept is admirable enough to satisfy the needs of various market groups, from residential to industrial users. The technology was similarly eco-friendly, allowing for the treatment of water effluents and substances in a specific region under observation.

Additionally, the team of expatriates explored the possibility of constructing a completely automated, integrated system that could effectively connect the central monitoring unit to filtration systems. However, gaps in the management hierarchy typified by inadequate communication between line managers and the technical team impeded the project's successful implementation (McCabe, 2010). Engineers who have updated the original design 150 times are blamed by managers. Therefore, a prototype design cannot be realized due to the engineering department's haphazard management structure, which is not communicating effectively on the necessary methods for accomplishing the project. Consequently, many financial resources are lost.

In order for innovation to occur within businesses, transformational leadership is required. According to the philosophy of transformational leadership, innovative ideas are generated through teamwork, dialogue, delegation of authority, autonomy, and feedback procedures (Mullins, 2008). Effective communication between managers, engineers, and lower personnel requires further development. An regular cleaner discovers critical documents on the draft memorandum for moving from mass production to customization of parts, exposing the corporation to trade unionists and the general public.

Eau Doux Company has very aggressive teams of sales engineers, R&D specialists, and human resource professionals, but lacks vision-driven project managers and board-level leadership. Product innovation and market research are hampered by lukewarm decision making and ineffective execution techniques. The corporation has expended enormous R&D costs as a result of continuous research that cannot be completed due to grave quality issues. The research and development program for a centralized water quality monitoring system was such a great concept that it could have changed Eau Doux's financial possibilities if established timetables and professional ethics had been adhered to (Rieple& Haber berg, 2009).

Communication

Important firm information has been compromised, costing Eau Doux its market niche, revenue, reputation, and very existence (Toth, Grunig& Grunig, 2007). Unbelievably, an important company's confidential information leaked to the media through an ordinary cleaner. The subsequent walkout called by labor unionists demonstrates how much the company's reputation and financial prospects have suffered due to the collapse of communication channels. It is the first initiative of its sort in the region for R&D to develop an integrated central water monitoring, surveillance, and filtration system. However, implementation of the groundbreaking initiative is stalled by dissatisfied corporate employees, who later divulge the concept to a competing manufacturer. The company's communication systems are very deficient, to the benefit of its rivals.

In addition, it appears that unhappy sections of Eau Doux's management are collaborating with rivals to bring the company down and prevent its revolutionary potential from being fully realized. The company's code of ethics and professional rules are violated when patented product information is leaked. The company's management must establish strict disciplinary processes with terrible consequences for individuals of doubtful character. Despite this, the communication channels between the various departments of the firm must be strengthened by an acceptable leadership style. Transformational leadership enables followers to participate actively in interventional decision-making and problem-solving. It also stipulates feedback methods in which subordinates engage freely with supervisors and are authorized to share and receive input on subjects of mutual interest without fear of retaliation. For innovation to be successful within a business, there is a need for increased communication between departments (Woods& Adrian, 2001).

Professional requirements

Since Eau Doux is an engineering firm, frequent training of sales engineers and R&D methods are permitted, so long as management provides control. When constructing systems for water monitoring, surveillance, and filtration processes, it is crucial that engineering standards and specifications are adhered to. Professional standards are vital as a strategy for producing inimitable, high-quality products. If patents and trademarks are legally protected in an effective manner, the issue of imitation can be addressed constructively. The concept of transitioning from manufacturing to water systems to the customization of parts manufactured by other companies appears desperate and dangerous. The company's reputation for producing high-quality water surveillance systems and its substantial investment in R&D interventions prevent it from abandoning its projects.

There is a need to hire a more sophisticated, talented, and seasoned engineering department capable of designing high-quality systems (Lynch, 2010). Counterfeits and substitute products pose a danger to their market niche and future economic opportunities. The affordability of Eau Doux goods can be addressed adequately to guarantee that the purchasing power of the various market segments is accounted for in the pricing policy. During recruiting and selection, the human resource department at Eau Doux Company should be guided by professional ethics and a code of conduct. Before recruiting and selection, a job analysis is required to identify the approximate hiring and compensation practices.

The successful performance management method

Performance management is the methodical process through which managers evaluate employee productivity and performance to determine the extent to which an organization's vision and objectives have been realized. Managers build a number of components to guarantee that employee activities do not conflict with organizational objectives. These factors include:

Planning tasks and establishing objectives

Strategic planning is integral to the success of companies. Planning promotes methodical execution of activities and procedures. Effective planning directs the work of individuals and teams within businesses towards achieving business objectives (Gold& Bratton, 2001). Therefore, employees must be incorporated into the planning process to enable the successful implementation of an organization's goals.

Continuously monitoring employee performance

Managers of an organization regularly observe the actions and behaviors of their personnel. Employee monitoring helps managers to evaluate employees' performance on given tasks and provides a chance for offering and receiving feedback regarding the accomplishment of organizational objectives.

Increasing and training

Effective organizations have an established mechanism for periodically training their personnel. The training and development of employees is governed by performance benchmarks. By implementing efficient employee training programs, managers entrust their subordinates with new responsibilities and tasks. Therefore, training serves as a tool for simplifying work processes by incorporating skill acquisition interventions based on performance metrics (Gold& Bratton, 2001). Training reinforces workers' abilities to carry out their responsibilities.

General Motors: Supply Chain Management My Assignment Essay Help

Introduction

As the era of global trade advances, supply networks become increasingly significant. There is a wealth of theoretical knowledge devoted to constructing a sustainable supply chain in many domains and market conditions. However, the applicability of these hypotheses remains uncertain. The 2008-2009 decline of General Motors is an excellent example for analyzing this issue and drawing consequences for the company's current and future supply chain management.

Literature Review

Extremely diversified in terms of practices, theories, and models, supply chain management is a vast field of study. In order to gain a better understanding of the subject of the report, this paper will examine the supply chain management at General Motors by reviewing a selection of relevant literature.

Wisner, Tan, and Leong carried out one of the seminal contributions to the field of supply chains (2014). In this publication, the writers examined supply chain common practices and theoretical knowledge. They define a supply chain as a collection of productive forces that participate in the manufacturing and delivery of a product to the end consumer. There can be changes in the number of participants, stages, and methods for each product. Wisner, Tan, and Leong (2014) emphasize, however, that practically in every instance it takes precise planning, administration, and coordination, as sometimes dozens of companies are involved in the process of creating a single product.

Wisner, Tan, and Leong (2014) identify and evaluate different supply chain management (SCM) models utilized in commercial practice. Supply-Chain Operations Reference, or SCOR, is a model that examines the overall performance of a supply chain. It is based on four "pillars": modeling of processes and re-engineering, performance evaluation criteria, best practices, and the necessary SCM skills. The first addresses managerial processes applicable to various types of enterprises, including planning, resource gathering, production, delivery, and return (Wisner, Tan, & Leong 2014). The second includes more than 140 performance measures that provide senior management with a comprehensive view of their supply chain. About 400 distinct practices have been recognized by many successful managers and are distinguished by their applicability to the current business climate, different areas of operation, degree of success, and usefulness (Wisner, Tan, & Leong 2014).

Perez offers a second intricate perspective on supply chain management (2013). His supply chain strategy is centered on separating supply chains into six basic archetypes: Efficient, Quick, Continuous-Flow, Agile, Custom-Configured, and Flexible (Perez 2013, p 23). The roadmap then implements 42 metrics to monitor the performance of each type and determine if supply chain alterations are necessary and to which archetype they are ascribed. The author bases his approach on his own managerial expertise, making it a trustworthy business resource.

Almost all authors concur on the significance and high value of the planning stage, which can assist define critical areas for development and reorganization, as well as objectives, strategies, and other crucial SCM aspects (MacCarthy et al. 2016; Perez 2013; Stadtler 2005). The researchers also emphasize the importance of establishing relationships with partners that are mutually beneficial. Otherwise, such relationships are infrequently dependable and durable (Stadtler 2005; MacCarthy et al. 2016).

SCM is especially important for multinational corporations, whose structures are highly complicated and whose ineffective management can have a significant impact on their efficiency. MacCarthy et al. (2016) indicate that, to boost the productivity of interactions between partners within a global inter-corporate chain, the appropriate use of appropriate IT is vital under conditions of increased speed and volatility.

Supply Chain Dangers

Frequently, supply chain hazards are classified as either external or internal. The former is represented by conditions that are beyond the company's control, whilst the latter is directly within its command. External influences include well-known elements such as supply and demand. For instance, the availability of raw materials or components could be halted by a natural disaster. For instance, a storm, flood, or earthquake might wipe out crops necessary for the production of plant-based foods. In such a scenario, a company manufacturing grains in a disaster-stricken region would have to reroute its connections and seek out new partners with raw material supplies.

Unforeseen circumstances may also result in an abrupt fall in demand. As an illustration, one may recall that cocaine and heroin were frequently used as anesthetics in clinics. When the data demonstrating the grave repercussions of cocaine use was published, the demand for the drug in clinics decreased. In the eighteenth century, lead-based cosmetics experienced a similar fate.

The proliferation of terrorism and cybercrime is a further external threat. Various groups may disrupt the supply chain by stealing or corrupting valuable data or destroying property. Such occurrences are typically unexpected and may target either a partner or the parent company.

Significant risks are posed to the entire supply chain by the business issues of a key supplier, which could damage the primary company. For example, if a coal mining business declares bankruptcy, the supply of hot water to homes that rely on thermoelectric power plants may be interrupted.

Internal hazards include issues that can halt production or sever commercial ties within the core organization. Manufacturing hazards, such as technical issues in production facilities, may be associated with potentially destructive issues. Inadequate planning may result in unanticipated financial or human losses, or even insolvency. Ineffective business procedures, such as faulty information management or bureaucracy, may also contribute to the demise of the company and its suppliers.

In order to remain competitive and maintain ties with suppliers, mitigating these risks necessitates comprehensive planning and management in all domains, as well as the collection of correct and appropriate information.

Case Report

General Motors

General Motors was one of the corporations that attracted great attention from researchers (GM). The company's history is distinguished by its climbs and falls, such as its 2009 bankruptcy, rebirth by federal funding, and current relative prosperity. The business was established in 1908 as a maker of horse-drawn vehicles. Through a succession of astute purchases, General Motors was able to become a major maker of vehicles in a variety of price ranges and styles. In the early 1980s, the corporation sold approximately 350,000 automobiles annually under the Cadillac, Buick, Chevrolet, and other brands. Due to its inability to optimize its internal structure, the company lost practically all of its assets and went bankrupt during the 2009 financial crisis. In their manufacturing plants, sales offices, and owned enterprises, GM employed approximately one million Americans. The U.S. government chose to buy out General Motors' debts and restructure them in order to restore the company to the market because a million workers losing their jobs would be disastrous for the economy.

Due in part to GM's strict connections with its suppliers and employees, the 2008-2009 economic crisis had a profound impact on the company. According to Goolsbee and Krueger (2015), the demise of GM would result in a high number of supplier bankruptcies, as the company was a major partner for car seat and other equipment manufacturers. GM has always struggled to discriminate between its suppliers and its low-skilled workers, which is another contributing factor (Helper & Henderson 2014).

Therefore, General Motors is an unusual instance with significant implications for supply chain management. It highlights the benefits of effective management-worker relationships, the significance of foresight, and risk management in large multicultural and multinational enterprises.

Lessons Learned from the Literature

Due to the case's bankruptcy and resurgence history's illustrative value, business analysts and academics paid close attention to it. As was indicated previously, Goolsbee and Krueger (2015) determined that the failure of a large manufacturer in a certain industry produces enormous problems for the entire supply chain, which has significant consequences for supply chain management. Also, Helper and Henderson (2014) stated that a significant portion of the company's problems stemmed from its connections with its suppliers. In comparison to its Japanese competitors, the average time GM spent on the whole car production cycle was uncompetitive. The rigidity of GM's internal structure, as evidenced by its fixed-rate payment plans, also contributed to its market failure during the financial crisis (Goolsbee & Krueger) (2015). In addition, Helper and Henderson link the low salaries offered to GM factory workers with the company's high defect rate.

From the Literature Review, Arguments Emerged.

The aforementioned issues demonstrate that General Motors experienced systematic supply chain inefficiencies. The researchers link these difficulties to numerous causes. One of them was an incapacity to perceive contemporary obstacles and to assess the strengths of their opponents (Helper & Henderson 2014). GM's top executives appear to have heavily depended on the techniques they have employed thus far. They were appropriate while the market and economic conditions were favorable, but GM's scale and structural rigidity prevented it from adjusting as quickly as was necessary in rapidly changing conditions.

Lack of competition in the 1970s and 1980s, when the corporation held a 50-60% market share, made the company less vigilant to potential threats when Toyota and Honda automobiles began to come on the American market (Helper & Henderson 2014). Another problem was the absence of a just-in-time inventory system, which increased manufacturing costs (Helper & Henderson 2014).

Opportunities and Difficulties

The company was faced with a wide variety of obstacles. First, the organization lacked the capability for fast organizational transformation. The firm fought to overcome the union contracts that obligated them to make set payments. Closing a manufacturing site would necessitate a significant number of legacy payments, which would slow down the process. Another difficulty was the company's inability to withstand a decline in sales profit. The aforementioned rigidity impeded the company's ability to adjust to its losses. As a result of GM's inability to identify and assess its competitors and its overconfidence in its own processes, the increase in competition became the company's most pressing issue.

Concerning opportunities, the company's recent revival has afforded it the chance to evaluate its supply chain management and fight for a share of its former market. Another possibility is a detailed examination of more successful competitors, such as Toyota and Honda, which have already become multinational organizations. If GM could employ these techniques to restructure its own supply lines, the decreased average cost and manufacturing time, as well as the techniques used to achieve them, would be beneficial. GM has the option to rethink its staffing policies now that it is relatively free of its prior financial obligations. The company will be able to better adapt to the current scenario if it establishes entirely new strategic objectives for its supplier relationships. After a huge catastrophe, GM was awarded a second chance, which provided it with an exceptional opportunity to study and comprehend its mistakes and ensure they are never repeated.

Business Practice Applicability of the Theoretical Knowledge

Frequently, a model is a theoretical construct whose actual execution may necessitate extensive reorganization and incur substantial expenses. This occurs in part because the real world has a complex structure and a massive number of distinct occurrences. The majority could be examined, organized, and forecasted. However, the effects of some remain unknown. The human component, for instance, is one of the most unpredictable and potentially disruptive variables. Each individual’s responses to stress could be unpredictable, and a CEO who was admired by coworkers and business partners could see a decline in professional skills due to illness or other personal situations. In the case of GM, the senior management's alleged personal refusal to adapt to difficulties led to the catastrophic failure of the company and its partners.

Typically, researchers develop intricate frameworks and theories to address such a challenge, but execution becomes problematic. A complicated and multifactorial model, such as SCOR, is highly dependent on the availability of information necessary for the evaluation of critical parameters. The larger the chain, the more difficult it is to collect and process all required data. The introduction of new IT technologies, such as electronic document flow, significantly simplifies this work. Due to the fact that partners may not always be as vigilant or may not possess the same technology, the dependability of the data may be an issue. Such a problem exists, for example, in developing nations, although GM will likely manage such a danger (Georgise, Wuest, & Thoben 2017).

Another difficulty associated with the applicability of theoretical knowledge is the limited expertise of the author in SCM. As such, Hernan David Perez designed the above-mentioned road map, constructing it based on his own SCM expertise in the fields of fast-moving consumer products, car manufacture, and retail. Even while the approach is utilized successfully in these industries, there is no assurance that it will function in other fields, such as oil and gas. Due of the author's expertise in the field of SCM for vehicle manufacture, this road map may be appropriate in this instance.

The regional distinctiveness of business connections is another concern. In Asian countries, for instance, long-lasting and fruitful relationships between spouses are built through a lengthy and meticulous process of forming personal connections. In contrast, in the United States and Europe, a great deal depends on the offer and terms with specific figures and quantities. However, cultural diversity is now a widely-applied notion in the field of global supply chain management. GM will be able to overcome this challenge if it takes a culturally sensitive approach to developing trustworthy partnerships with suppliers and their personnel from other nations.

All the aforementioned challenges demonstrate once more the complexity of global business conditions and the multiplicity of variables that might have varying degrees of impact on the performance of SCM. The applicability of theoretical frameworks, concepts, and models is hindered by the specific combination of business environment peculiarities in a given country, relationships between partners, and the level of technological advancement attained and employed in the companies forming a supply chain. However, a judicious selection of methods and practices coupled with an appropriate SCM model can assist the organization in overcoming these obstacles.

Recommendations

As a first step following such an incidence, the company should perform a thorough examination of its past and present to determine what it must do to be competitive on the market now and tomorrow. GM may consider implementing a complicated model such as SCOR for supply chain analysis. It will expose the company's internal and external relations' strengths and weaknesses and provide executives with insight on intervention areas. The organization should not undervalue the planning phase of implementing change in the realm of SCM since it affords the opportunity to foresee potential dangers and take precautions against them.

GM's senior management should also apply progressive thinking in order to not just implement ideas that work for their competitors, but also remain ahead of them. Globalization brings many more dangers than recession or competition. GM must consider fail-safe solutions to safeguard its supply chain from data manipulation or theft in order to combat terrorism and organized cybercrime.

Conclusion

Supply chain management has a significant impact on the market performance of an organization. Effective SCM performance evaluation methodologies and models help ensure a company's competitiveness. The General Motors case study demonstrates that supply networks must be managed with the utmost expertise. Problems encountered by the company during the 2008-2009 economic downturn demonstrate that a flexible internal structure and well-established partnership with suppliers could be the difference between survival and failure.

Bibliography

Georgise, F., Wuest, T., and Thoben, K. (2017). SOR model application in poor countries: obstacles and requirements.

A. Goolsbee and A. Krueger, "A retrospective look at rescuing and restructuring General Motors and Chrysler," Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 29, no. 2, pages 2-34, 2015.

Helper, S., and R. Henderson, "Management practices, relational contracts, and the decline of General Motors," Journal of Economic Perspectives, vol. 28, no. 1, pages 49-72, 2014.

Supply chain evolution — theory, concepts, and science.

Supply chain roadmap, H. Perez, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform, New York, NY, 2013.

Stadtler, H 2005, ‘Supply chain management and advanced planning––basics, overview and challenges’, European Journal of Operational Research, vol. 163, pp. 575–588

London: Cengage Learning, 2014, Wisner, D., C. Tan, and G. Leong, Principles of supply chain management: a balanced approach.

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