Business Ethics And How It Influences The World College Admission Essay Help

The concept of business ethics derives mostly from general human ethics and applies these principles and guidelines to the corporate world. A system of moral principles and rules that govern a just and civilized society constitutes ethics (Bradburn 8). Business ethics refers to how people's values and sense of justice are incorporated into agreements and decisions between businesses and organizations around the world. The core concept of business ethics is that it directly corresponds with the rules of a society and the generosity of the people that comprise it, and in order for companies and organizations to thrive, ethics should be a guideline that is never disregarded.

To prevent illegal issues and the anarchy of anarchy, corporate acts must be governed by ethics and, more significantly, by regulations based on ethical conduct. If a firm is not restricted in how it produces profits, its financial avarice will compel it to prioritize making the greatest money as quickly as possible, regardless of the delicate balance between nature and the ways humans exploit it for personal gain. It is a recognized fact that people frequently justify their damaging activities in the hope that their irresponsibility will not affect the future of the world or future generations. It is far too prevalent to believe that in the far future, "magical" technology would eliminate all negativity and damage in the world. However, this is not how the world operates, and if these crucial issues are not addressed in a timely manner, it may be too late to correct them in the future, as certain events would be nearly hard to reverse. The primary purpose of business ethics is to control the behavior of corporations in regard to the surrounding natural environment, people, and societal laws and regulations. A further reason why ethics is the proper route for any organization is that honesty will be appreciated and the rewards acquired from compassion will be significantly higher than those gained from lies and dishonesty. However, regulations and laws are frequently incapable of limiting the ever-expanding harmful acts of a firm. For additional examination, consider the instance of Silverstar Chemical Company, which dumped cancer-causing waste into a nearby river and falsified records. They would be compelled by law to carry the rubbish to a legal dumpsite at such a high cost that 10,000 employees would lose their jobs (Roa 186). The purpose of the laws is to govern and control the behavior of corporations in order to protect society from both physical and emotional harm. Frequently, however, it is possible to circumvent the law by using legal loopholes, allowing pollution and environmental degradation to continue. The objective of legislators and society is to make laws as inclusive as possible, addressing every possible consequence through ongoing review and examination of the aspects involved in such a complex topic.

As enterprises and their repercussions spread over the globe, significant impacts on nature and its preservation can be witnessed. Several regulations govern the relationship between enterprises and the environment. Some of them govern noise, odors, damage to land, buildings, and property in general, as well as health issues for humans, animals, and plants living nearby (Jennings 357). In addition to the readily observable physical elements, other factors may be associated with the vicinity of a harmful business. For instance, if it is a plant that employs a great deal of wiring and electromagnetic towers, it could damage the property prices of nearby homes (Jennings 359). Unfortunately, a large number of challenges and affects of a business location on the surrounding environment are extremely difficult to identify. There are a variety of options that would conceal the infractions of corporations without leaving traces. A plant may dump its garbage into a nearby lake or sea at night without anyone seeing, or it could have a designated spot where the waste would be buried for years before being detected. It is a known truth that pollution generated by human activities has resulted in environmental changes in the modern world. World organizations now monitor industrial sites with harmful emissions, restricting the quantity and percentages of pollutants released into the atmosphere. The Kyoto Protocol's implementation of a system that rewards countries for reducing their pollution levels is an effective method for regulating this issue. Even the automobile industry is taking action by producing more electrified, eco-friendly vehicles with less carbon emissions. It is indisputable that humanity is taking the required steps to control its ecological imprint, directed by morals and ethics that are essentially governed by goodness and humanity, a delicate balance between human civilization and the natural environment that exists in all forms of life.

Real-world examples are useful for analyzing business ethics further. Consider a situation between McDonald's and L.C. Big Mak Burger Inc. The court determined that it was a violation of rights since the Big Mak Burger's name sounded identical to that of the McDonald's burger, which was popular. It was demonstrated that the L.C. Big Mak had no creative reasoning for adopting such a moniker, other than to exploit an existing trade name (Roa 174). This would be regarded unethical because it is unjust and unfair to take someone else's idea and change a single letter in the name to "seemingly" differentiate it from the original. The 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is another instance in which ethics come into play. The British multinational corporation BP, whose oil was spilt, determined that the most effective response would be to spray a chemical dispersant that would break the oil into microscopic droplets that would sink (Halbert 20). Ethically, the cleanup may appear to be a step in the right direction, but it also released an unstudied chemical into the environment, not to mention that the oil droplets that sank would remain on the sea floor with unknown effects on the ecology in the present and future. Ethically, the clean-up was a noble idea, but the company's tactics were the quickest and least expensive because it is not concerned with the future of the earth, only its own wealth and business.

Business ethics are just as essential as any other type of ethics. It draws a distinction between sincerity, humanism, and kindness and evil, which is founded on deceit and personal gain. The governing bodies of corporations and society should ensure that there are always laws and regulations that conserve and protect the world and everyone who calls it "home" since businesses extend their influence to the farthest reaches of the planet.

References

Bradburn, Roger. Understanding Business Ethics was published by Thomson Learning in 2001.

Jennings, Marianne. South-Western Cengage Learning, 2010. Environment Business: Its Legal, Ethical, and Global Environment.

Terry Halbert and E. Ingulli. Law & Ethics in the Business Environment was published by South-Western Cengage Learning in Connecticut in 2010.

Roa, Floriano. Business Ethics and Social Responsibility. Rex Bookstore Inc., Philippines, 2007. Print.

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Emaar Hospitality Group’s Segmentation, Targeting, Positioning Strategies College Admission Essay Help

Emaar Hospitality Group is a subsidiary of one of the leading real estate companies in the United Arab Emirates, Emaar Properties. It is a publicly traded firm worth approximately $9.7 billion as of 2018. The organization provides management and development services on a global scale and operates globally. Emaar Properties is well-known for its large-scale projects in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) area. The Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building, is probably Emaar Properties' most recognizable project. Other large-scale projects by Emaar Properties include Dubai districts with a recognized signature design that relies on Arabic architecture traditions and combines them with modern elements.

Emaar Hospitality Group, one of the company's most successful businesses, touts itself as a global provider of "personal, innovative, and unforgettable lifestyle experiences." It develops venues for contemporary visionaries to enjoy life and restore their vitality. Emaar Hospitality Group focuses on luxury hotels and restaurants that alter the United Arab Emirates' hospitality industry. Due to the diversity of Emaar Hospitality Group's developed and managed projects, this study will only focus on one: At.mosphere Burj Khalifa. The restaurant is positioned on the 122nd floor of the world's highest structure, 442 meters above the earth. It provides its guests stunning views of the Arabian Gulf and a vast selection of critically regarded culinary delights. This article evaluates At.mosphere's market positioning and segmentation and gives pertinent theoretical underpinnings.

Literature Review

Market segmentation is crucial to a marketing strategy; it drives the marketing decisions of firms. The concept of market segmentation derives from the economic pricing theory, which asserts that it is possible to maximize profits through differential segment pricing (Venter, Wright & Dibb, 2015). Market segmentation assists in overcoming market heterogeneity by generating a product that meets the desires of the majority of consumers (Venter, Wright & Dibb, 2015). Instead, it is recommended that businesses group clients with comparable product choices and purchasing behaviors together, so creating homogenous segments with distinct requirements and preferences (Venter, Wright & Dibb, 2015). Market segmentation is essential because it enables companies to deploy resources more effectively and gain a deeper understanding of their client base. Currently, segmentation characteristics such as demographic, geographic, psychographic, and behavioral are utilized by researchers. These criteria are utilized to classify customers and generate homogenous groupings.

After defining market categories, a corporation proceeds with targeting. Because not all segments are actually aligned with a company's marketing strategy, it is necessary to select those that make the most sense. Targeting involves reaching out to carefully selected segments based on their potential and commercial appeal (Chernev, 2018). According to Chernev (2018), the size of the market must be sufficient to justify segmentation. Otherwise, combining customers could result in increasingly smaller divisions, making it difficult to reach them. Segments must be distinct, and their differences must be easily observable and quantifiable (Chernev, 2018). Selected segments must make financial sense, as predicted profits must exceed the expenditures of extra marketing programs and other modifications. According to Chernev (2018), segment selection is heavily influenced by segment accessibility: customers must be able to receive messages intended for them.

After market segmentation and targeting, market positioning is the subsequent step. Through market positioning, a brand attempts to influence consumer perception. It gives a product or service a unique identity that distinguishes it from its competitors. According to Chernev (2018), market positioning establishes a brand's image. It assists customers in associating a brand with a certain status, emotion, or experience if done effectively. Market positioning is required to provide a unique selling proposition: express values and benefits that would persuade consumers to switch brands (Chernev, 2018). This can be accomplished by cost leadership, such as delivering inexpensive items, or differentiation, i.e. capitalizing on the distinctive qualities of goods or services. An successful market positioning strategy consists of three steps: defining the distinctiveness of the company, determining its existing market position, and examining its competitors' interaction, influence, and leverage.

Variables of Segmentation: Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning

At.mosphere Burj Khalifa targets market categories that are distinguished by the following variables:

demographic. At.mosphere welcomes consumers of both sexes, with a particular emphasis on women. The restaurant hosts female-only gatherings where women can enjoy the company of like-minded people without worrying about their safety. At.mosphere has the ability to attract customers of various ages. As for income, the current restaurant falls into the category of upscale: the minimum check is $220, which is not exactly cheap for a wider demographic; geography. At.mosphere has the ability to appeal to both locals and international visitors. Regarding local tourism, the restaurant may appeal to metropolitan people as well as remote locals who do not frequently visit Dubai; psychographic. At.mosphere is expected to attract clients with pronounced patterns of novelty-seeking behavior. Reaching the top of the world's tallest structure is an adventure, and the view of the Gulf from about a half-kilometer above the earth is stunning. Aside from that, the restaurant may attract guests who enjoy making lasting impressions. At.mosphere could be an appropriate location for a date, business meeting, or formal occasion. The location can also serve as a place of relaxation for men and women conducting business during the day; it is behavioristic. It is conceivable that At.mosphere would be included in vacation itineraries, particularly those that focus on Dubai's most stunning attractions. Tourists may be more receptive to new experiences, and their desire for novelty may offset the high cost of reserving a spot at At.mosphere Burj Khalifa.

The Five Forces Model of Porter

At.mosphere is now aiming to attract wealthy women who know what they want from service and enjoy unwinding in the company of like-minded folks after a hard day of work. The Five-Force model developed by Michael E. Porter is a useful instrument for analyzing the dynamics of the restaurant business in the United Arab Emirates. Below is a breakdown of the model's essential components:

The threat posed by new entrants is moderate. The United Arab Emirates scored eleventh in the 2019 Doing Business ranking, which evaluates the ease of conducting business in various nations. It is a big improvement from 2018, when the country was placed 21st, demonstrating substantial improvements in corporate rules. Logistically, opening a restaurant in the UAE may not be as difficult as it once was, but establishing a presence is still difficult. The most desirable urban locations of the UAE have sky-high rents: launching a small, independent establishment may cost between AED 500,000 and AED 1,250,000 ("Top challenges faced by the restaurant industry in UAE and how to overcome them," 2018). The negotiating power of purchasers is high. Female consumers, whether residents or visitors, have a plenty of options. As the ratio of restaurants to customers increases, customers' expectations rise and they refuse to accept inferior treatment. Switching expenses are fairly low: in urban locations, all it takes to discover another decent place is a simple Internet search. Moreover, Emirati women are expert shoppers: Societe Generale (2020) reports that females make up to 80% of shopping decisions in the UAE. Medium bargaining leverage on the part of suppliers. Due to the climate, the agricultural capability of the Emirates is insufficient. This means that, if supplied locally, the food sector has a limited number of possibilities from which to pick. Alternatively, businesses who prefer to rely on offshore production must figure out logistics and maintain positive relationships with their partners. This is especially true for restaurants serving unusual cuisine, such as At.mosphere Burj Khalifa. The threat of substitutes is moderate. On the one hand, when it comes to the restaurant industry, female customers have numerous options. At.mosphere Burj Khalifa stands out, though, because it is one of the few venues that hosts events exclusively for women. In addition, its location atop the world's highest structure makes it unique. Visiting At.mosphere is an experience that involves all of the senses, not just the palate. Industry rivalry is intense. The restaurant industry in the UAE is one of the largest and most competitive economic sectors, with almost twelve thousand cafes and restaurants. Statistically, there are up to 3,000 restaurants per million UAE citizens. The increasing variety of new eateries, combined with low entry barriers and a favorable economic environment, has increased industry competition in the country. The environment of the food sector in the Emirates is shaped by shifting demographics, thriving tourism, and the country's location at the center of the Middle East.

It should also be emphasized that Emiratis are fond of luxury brands. According to Societe Generale (2020), Dubai accounts for one-third of the whole luxury market in the Middle East. Residents of the UAE spend up to 30 percent of their monthly income on luxury goods and services. It indicates that the UAE is a market favourable to the sale of luxury goods and experiences, hence increasing rivalry among its participants.

Atmospheric POP and POD Burj Khalifa

Points of parity and points of difference are abbreviated as POP and POD, respectively. POD refers to the contrasts between the analyzed brand and its competitors, whereas POP focuses on the similarities. In the case of At.mosphere Burj Khalifa, the product offers that are most comparable to those of competitors are the opulent atmosphere and fusion food. Dubai is renowned for its hospitality, luxury hotels, and fine dining establishments. At.mosphere is not an exception: it is a venue with opulent furnishings and a polished design that conforms to the dominant trends in the UAE restaurant industry. Although highly regarded by food critics, the cuisine is not particularly distinctive. It is currently a combination of the world's culinary traditions, which makes sense. The restaurant must get a significant portion of its revenue from tourists, which is why the cuisine is international in order to cater to the widest range of tastes.

What makes At.mosphere unique? Unique about the Burj Khalifa is its location atop the world's highest building. Today, Burj Khalifa is on every list of things to do in Dubai and the United Arab Emirates. The fact that At.mosphere is the highest restaurant in the world makes dining there an amazing experience. For an additional fee, customers can occupy prized seats on the next level, which is even higher off the ground. The evaluations on Google Maps and Trip Advisor are brimming with enthusiasm: customers describe their experience as unique. Some admit that they cannot adequately convey the beauty and atmosphere of the location.

Market Positioning of At.mosphere's Perceptional Map

Image 1. Perceptual map of At.mosphere Burj Khalifa in the food industry, United Arab Emirates

When establishing a market positioning strategy, perceptual maps are a useful tool. Image 1 demonstrates that perceptual maps include two axes: quality (X-axis) and price (Y-axis) (Y-axis). The market is divided into four categories based on this distinction: high price-high quality, low price-high quality, low price-poor quality, and high price-low quality. The second and fourth possibilities are somewhat exceptional: in the restaurant industry, quality appears to be proportionate to price on average. At.mosphere is located in the upper right corner of the perceptual map; it is an incredibly pricey establishment whose prices are, nevertheless, justified by its high-quality cuisine and unique atmosphere (Image 1). At.mosphere correctly pitches itself as a premium venue since dining at the top of the Burj Khalifa cannot and should not be an ordinary experience.

Azure Beach, Aryad Cafe, and Urban Bar & Kitchen are eateries in the middle price category that provide excellent food and service. Azure Beach stands out and, as a result, is placed higher on the trendline as a result of its placement in a resort, which lends the area additional glamour and style. The area on the lower left consists of two low-cost, low-quality restaurants with a hazy reputation and mixed ratings. The Sind Punjab Restaurant does not capitalize on its excellent customer service. Instead, it promotes itself as a place to get a snack without spending too much money. McDonalds needs no introduction; few people equate the world-renowned fast food restaurant with anything glamorous. Its marketing strategy is straightforward: low-priced, calorie-dense, unhealthy food.

Conclusion and Suggestion

At.mosphere Burj Khalifa is one of Emaar Hospitality Group's most successful initiatives. Emaar Hospitality Group is a subsidiary of the leading real estate developer in the UAE. At.mosphere, located atop the world's highest structure, advertises itself as a high-end luxury venue with an amazing atmosphere and superior service. The expensive charges are justified by the great quality of the food and the uniqueness of dining at the world's highest restaurant. In the near future, At.mosphere may wish to expand its presence in the market segment of wealthy ladies seeking leisure in female-only establishments. By doing so, Atmosphere will separate itself further from its competitors and establish a secure and welcoming environment for a promising market niche.

References

A. Chernev (2018). Strategic marketing management. Cerebellum Press. Societe Generale (2020). Emirates Arabes Unis: the market. The top obstacles facing the UAE restaurant business and how to overcome them. (2018). Web. Venter, P., Wright, A., & Dibb, S. (2015). A performative view on market segmentation that is effective. Marketing Management Journal, 31(1-2), 62-83.

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Human Resources Management Department’s Role College Admission Essay Help

Introduction

Human Resources Management is a crucial aspect of every organization. One could even claim that this function is fundamental and that all others are based upon it, given that the work of any organization depends heavily on its employees. Therefore, any ambitious business must cater to the demands of its employees, as the effectiveness of the organization's work is highly dependent on the staff's satisfaction with their working conditions and compensation.

Human resource management is the foundation of every organization, and all other firm activities must be built upon this foundation (Greenlaw, p. 27). Moreover, organizations with the highest level of Human Resources Management Sphere development have proven to be the most successful on the market, with the most competitive products (Greenlaw, p. 27).

Problem

In contrast, some businesses disregard the crucial role of the Human Resources Management Department and claim that this department's duties are limited to "tea and sympathy" (Brown, p. 1). Inasmuch as the success of any firm depends on its employees, it is impossible to dispute the fallacy of this reasoning.

The current essay is devoted to a study of Duncan Brown's letter to the editor of the Financial Times. The purpose of this article is to analyze the letter's proof of the significance of Human Resource Management to the organization and to demonstrate, using the economic model of Strategic Human Resource Management, how HRM can contribute to the success of every business (Ozaki, p. 37).

The Claims of Brown

Staff Vacancies

Consider the first argument made by Duncan Brown in his letter to the editor of the British publication Financial Times. This argument deals on the subject of organizational instability if the Human Resources Management Department is not given sufficient attention (Brown, p. 1).

Brown, citing to Stern and Drucker, hypothesizes that such a situation will result in personnel shortages because employees will be dissatisfied with the recruitment circumstances and compensation terms of the company for which they work or intend to work (Brown, p. 1).

This argument sounds pretty plausible, given that management should be aware of how their employees feel about them and the organization they work for. If the view is less than stellar, it will be necessary to implement positive improvements to the working environment, such as providing staff with free snacks, reducing their work hours, or boosting their compensation.

Special consideration must also be given to the working conditions of women who perform work designed for men. Care for pregnant employees and financial assistance for them is another crucial responsibility of every firm, and only a well-organized Human Resources Management Department can fulfill it.

However, this is impossible when the Human Resources Department is not operational and there is no connection between the levels of a company's structure (Capelli, p. 205). In every ambitious business where regular communication between high-ranking officials and regular employees is the norm, the level of work productivity is significantly higher than in organizations with a rigorous difference between the levels of their hierarchy (Shortt, p. 29).

Statistics

The rate of staff shortages in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland increased by 15% between 2001 and 2004 due to a lack of trained workers, as demonstrated by specific statistical data cited by Duncan Brown in support of his position.

Moreover, this circumstance was responsible for the rise in unemployment rates in the United Kingdom and had a negative impact not only on the activities of some businesses but also on the economy of the entire nation, which cannot be ignored. Moreover, according to Brown, staff shortages may impact vital industries such as oil and gas production, which would ultimately have a detrimental impact on the global fuel situation (Brown, p. 1).

Insofar as scientific data may be relied upon, one cannot disregard this argument and all of its evidence. In a country that is universally regarded to be highly developed in all respects, the situation in which the wrong attitude of several individuals towards the management of their businesses leads to issues of national and, in the future, global significance is a very peculiar occurrence.

Duncan Brown offers one possible solution in his letter to the editor of the Financial Times. Those concerned with business and ordinary workers who are deprived of working places as a result of the situation should look for ways to resolve the problems, and Brown offers one of the possible solutions in his letter (Brown, p. 1).

Possible Solution

According to Duncan Brown, one of the potential solutions to the problem was created by Dave Ulrich and is dubbed "The Pathway to Salvation." This is a unique concept of self-training and Human Resources Management that, if supported by employers, enables employees to feel influential and content with the work they perform at their workplaces (Sikula, p. 419). According to a poll conducted by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, more than one thousand members of this organization were pleased with the model and the outcomes it produced.

In addition, the researchers were persuaded that identical results would be obtained if the same research were conducted in any other field of work and based on any other company that utilizes Dave Ulrich's methodology. In addition, the researchers discovered, as Duncan Brown says, that the success of the model does not depend on the particulars of the work, but rather on the effectiveness of the Human Resources Management Department in a given organization.

As for this model, one cannot evaluate it solely on the basis of what another person says without applying it himself or herself, but it is undeniably beneficial if it results in good improvements in the work of at least some individuals; therefore, I find this argument to be quite convincing (Brown, p. 1).

HRM's Function in Company Development

Brown, in a letter based on a survey performed by the Said Business School for CIPD, provides additional evidence for the significance of HRM to every organization (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development). The poll revealed that managers and chief executives of the companies investigated valued their Human Resource Departments' contributions to the performance of their organizations more than any other department and underlined that Human Resources Management was of utmost importance to their businesses.

This argument, as well as all other views made by Duncan Brown in the letter under consideration, is also plausible to a large extent so long as it is supported by official statistics and evidence from the managers and chief executives (Al-Rajhi, p. 15).

Inasmuch as the nature of a company’s work might vary, so can the role of Human Resources Management. Nevertheless, I believe that one cannot reject the significance of Human Resources Management without at least attempting to determine how it would benefit his or her firm. Characteristically, many individuals pass judgment on a phenomenon they have never encountered, which is unacceptable in business (Greenlaw, p. 27).

Human Resource Management and the British Economy

In the previous-to-last paragraph of his letter, Duncan Brown makes his most powerful point. It discusses the significance of HRM to the United Kingdom's education and service-based economies as a whole (Brown, p. 1). Brown emphasizes that the area where human resource management (HRM) and company performance are lacking attention is one that requires it.

Again utilizing specific data, Brown establishes the clear relationship between the HRP and the rise of a company's profitability or productivity. This is a very compelling argument because, even though the relevance of Human Resources Management for a particular company can be questioned, its significance for the entire economy of the country, which has been empirically demonstrated, leaves no room for disagreement.

In addition, Brown demonstrates that, according to worldwide comparative studies conducted by McKinsey and LSE, the United Kingdom has the lowest level of management quality in all of Europe, and that this is largely due to the apathy of many chief executives towards this issue (Brown, p. 1).

Therefore, British enterprises are unable to compete with corporations from the United States of America, European countries, and China, and they lag behind the most significant worldwide market events (Capelli, p. 205). This aspect cannot be ignored, and in this instance, the state authorities should pay special attention to it, as the subject of Human Resources Management gains national significance.

HRM Economic Model

Essence

After analyzing all the arguments from Duncan Brown's letter to the editor of the Financial Times, let's evaluate how excellent Human Resources Management may contribute to the growth and value of the organization (Al-Rajhi, p. 15). To make the research as precise as possible, let's employ a Strategic Human Resource Management economic model that will allow us to assess all the positive and negative aspects of this event.

Let's begin by stating that every ambitious organization must have multiple Human Resources Management models that allow it to expand into all areas of its operations. If we consider, as an example, a firm engaged in the production of gas and oil, the importance of Human Resources Management will be apparent, and if effectively implemented, it will bring wealth and success to such a company (Howes, p. 53).

For instance, if a company producing oil or gas encounters issues with the competitiveness of its production and staffing shortages, the Human Resources Management Plan will be of great assistance. If the Economic model of Strategic Human Resources Management is used, the company can recruit new workers by providing them with acceptable working circumstances and structuring its trade strategies with regard to its financial interests (Niehaus, p. 53).

This will be accomplished as a result of the essence of the economic model, which rests in the ability of the firm's management to employ and develop the resources that are available to only this organization. Inasmuch as other companies do not have access to these resources and may be unprepared for the new standards of work that this company may offer, the company's use of them permits it to advance in its development.

Special HRM Sources

These sources may include, among others, the beneficial economic and partnership relations and connections of this organization with other organizations on the local and international markets, as well as the company's access to highly-qualified personnel and innovative decisions made by its employees (Capelli, p. 205).

Using the economic model of Strategic Human Resources Management, a company can quickly overcome possible stagnations or crises in its development and, by implementing its specific resources, reach a higher level of development in which its products are consistently competitive on the market and the efficiency of the production process is continually enhanced (Teo, p. 1).

Conclusions

All of Duncan Brown's arguments and the analysis of the Economic Model of Human Resource Management allow us to reach a reasonable conclusion regarding this work. It would not be an exaggeration to argue that Human Resources Management is a critical concern for every ambitious firm on the planet. It can allow the firm to become a leader on both the foreign and domestic markets if successfully executed.

In this paper, we were able to accomplish all of the objectives stated in the thesis statement. First, we were able to determine where the fundamental relevance of Human Resources Management rests and how its development might be advantageous for every organization if given sufficient attention.

We also examined the arguments provided by Duncan Brown in his letter to the editor of the Financial Times in support of his position regarding the significance of Human Resources Management, and we attempted to determine how the economic model of Strategic Human Resources Management can be advantageous to an organization.

According to statistical data from surveys and studies undertaken by different British agencies and institutes, the significance of Human Resources Management is acknowledged globally and is the determining element for a company's performance.

Corporations in the United Kingdom that pay little attention to this reality are currently regarded as the worst-managed companies in Europe, which harms their operations and the worldwide reputation of the United Kingdom as a whole.

Certain programs and models of Human Resources Management operation, such as Dave Ulrich's "Pathway to Salvation," can transform the situation in British organizations; the only impediment in their way is the managerial staff's lack of attention to the issue (Brown, p. 1).

References

Josse Roussel, Al-Rajhi, Ibrabim, Yochanan Altman, Beverly Metcalfe, and Ibrabim. 2006. Managing expatriate adjustment as a fundamental challenge in human resource management. Human Resource Planning 29, no. 4: fifteen or more.

Brown, David. Letters to the editor: Critical connection between human resource management and performance From the pen of Duncan Brown. Financial Times.

Cappelli, Peter, and Nikolai Rogovsky. New Work Systems and Skill Demands, 1994. International Labour Review, volume 133, number 2: 205+ pages.

Paul S. Greenlaw and William R. Valonis. Applications of Expert Systems for Human Resource Management, 1994 Human Resource Planning, vol. 17, no. 1: 27+ pages.

Peter Howes and Pat Foley. Strategic Human Resource Management: An Australian Case Study was published in 1993. Human Resource Planning, volume 16, number 3: 53+ pages.

Strategic HRM, Human Resource Planning 18, no. 3: 53+, Richard Niehaus, 1995.

Labor Relations and Work Organization in Industrialized Countries, by Muneto Ozaki, in International Labour Review 135, no. 1 (1996): 37+.

Thomas L. Shortt and Yvonne V. Thayer. 1999. How Changing Time and Human Resource Management Can Help Students and Teachers Succeed 29th issue of Technos: A Quarterly for Education and Technology.

Andrew Sikula Sr., The Five Largest HRM Lies, Public Personnel Management 30, no. 3 (2001): 419.

Stephen T.T. Teo and John Crawford 2005. Indicators of Strategic Human Resource Management Effectiveness: A Case Study of an Australian Public Sector Organization amid Commercialization. Public Personnel Management 34, no. 1: 1+.

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Role Of Corporate Governance In Strategic Decision-Making College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Corporation's advantages and disadvantages The company's talents, resources, and key competencies Corporate governance's function in strategic decision-making Environmental analyses References

The purpose of company analysis is to determine a company's capabilities as well as its departments' deficiencies. In addition, recommendations for enhancing output or sales are included in the report. This study will focus on the leadership management in this corporation's power tool division. As the director of strategic planning and analysis, I am tasked with analyzing the various roles played by the management leadership in the power tools department in order to determine the root cause of the problem, which is the decline in market share for certain power tools within the organization. The firm report is categorical regarding the quality of some instruments that are being introduced to the market, hence contributing to this decline in market dominance; the tools are of poor quality (Cardy, 2008). In this instance, the analysis will be predominate in emphasizing the company's strengths and flaws. This will include a review of the company's resources and how they have been employed in each department, particularly the power tools department, which has reported a weak marketing approach. The purpose of this analysis is to supply the organization with valuable marketing approaches and strategies, hence enhancing its profitability.

Corporation's advantages and disadvantages

Positive aspect of the company is that it has engineered new ideas through the quality and competency of its staff. If the organization invests in harnessing the employees' abilities and empowering them, this can lead to improved production, hence enhancing the business's profitability (Enriques and Volpin, 2007). The company's image as a pioneer in wireless technology is another of its strengths, and if it can prevent competitors from replicating its work, it may expand its market share.

This firm has a significant difficulty in its production unit, as evidenced by the fact that only their circular saws match customer expectations for quality. This has resulted in a fall in the market share of the other goods, leaving circular saws with a 40% market share, which they have maintained with great success. This market dominance may be fine in the short-term because the company needs the money, but it is not appropriate in the long-term because the company will eventually withdraw its other items from the market (Cardy, 2008). This withdrawal of certain of its items will result in the company's demise. The firm also suffers from a deficiency of relevant and essential market knowledge. This is a crucial issue since management cannot design an effective plan for selling its products without the correct information. In addition, the company has not conducted an analysis in a couple of years, leading the management to make confusing judgments that waste the company's resources and time. These decisions have resulted in the firm receiving conflicting market information, which has proved disastrous for the corporation. The corporation has been rocked by discord within the senior management team, which has impeded decision-making and consequently caused market concerns.

The company's talents, resources, and key competencies

If properly invested, the corporation's highly qualified and capable people resource can propel the business to new heights. This firm offers a comprehensive selection of power tools, making it a one-stop-shop for customers, in contrast to similar organizations that typically specialize in a single product line. This is a company advantage that must be enhanced and completely utilized if the company is to achieve the desired market share. Due to its proficiency in creating certain power tools, such as circular power tools, the company has won a great deal of consumer esteem; this should serve as a springboard for producing higher-quality goods (Cardy, 2008).

Corporate governance's function in strategic decision-making

The corporate governance body is responsible for providing advice to the corporation's management. The advice provided by board members is vital to the company's decision-making process since board members typically conduct study on the company's numerous concerns before advising management. Members of corporate governance are involved in policy formation, which is crucial to the organization because management choices are based on these policies (Enriques and Volpin, 2007). Corporate governance fosters accountability in a corporation, thereby guaranteeing that the management level makes appropriate and accountable decisions. Therefore, excellent corporate governance is a driver of smart and informed decisions within a firm, resulting in its success.

Environmental analyses

This business manufactures and distributes environmentally hazardous power tools. They generate excessive noise and vibrations, none of which are environmentally friendly. The investigation revealed that three out of ten manufactured equipment are defective and noncompliant with environmental requirements. This means that 30% of manufactured equipment are hazardous to the user due to excessive noise or vibrations. It is also crucial to note that some of these machines generate considerable heat, making their operation unpleasant for the user. This heat might lead to catastrophic diseases such as cancer, and the corporation should take action about its production facility.

References

(2008), Management: People, Performance, Change, third edition, New York, New York, USA: L. Cardy.

(2007) Corporate governance reforms in Continental Europe, by L. Enriques and P. Volpin. 21(1) Journal of Economic Perspectives: 117–140.

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The Clinical Concierge Services: Solving The Issues Of Communication College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Issues to be addressed at CCS Failure to Address the Issues New Hardware and Software Implementation Cultural Issues Conclusion Bibliography

Introduction

Clinical Concierge Services (CCS) is an international department at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) at UPMC that provides administrative, translation, medical, hospitality, and financial services. Communication has a vital function in organizations because it promotes interaction between diverse groups of individuals (Importance of Communication in an Organization, 2012). However, CCS confronts communication obstacles that must be addressed.

The most significant issue to be addressed at CCS is the communication breakdown problem. Several data collection techniques were employed in order to establish the organization's primary issue. For instance, questionnaires were utilized to collect vital information. In addition, procedures involving the interaction of participants in focus groups were employed. This issue may have severe repercussions; therefore, it must be thoroughly addressed to preserve the organization's reputation (Importance of Communication in an Organization, 2012).

CCS issues to be addressed

The first issue is that the foreign office does not respond promptly to client issues. This dissatisfies them, as they are typically eager to receive vital updates on the condition of their loved ones. However, when they report to the international office, they are not provided with the desired information as quickly as they would want due to poor communication. This issue is exacerbated by the fact that CCS does not have sufficient personnel, so that one individual cannot deliver all services. CCS must build a communication infrastructure that ensures overseas clients receive the appropriate information without delay in order to resolve this issue. For instance, CCS can employ more staff to provide foreign clients with effective services.

The second issue requiring quick action at CCS is the pervasive silo mindset within the organization. It is caused by a lack of collaboration between CCS divisions (Leistner, 2012). This implies that individuals from all divisions should collaborate to improve the organization's service provision. When a coordinator leaves office, it is difficult for subsequent coordinators to follow up on issues that do not fall under their divisions (Data collection methodology, 2012). The issue of silo mindset should be resolved by enhancing coordination amongst CCS sections with crucial tasks. The organization should offer workshops in which all divisions are represented to educate employees on how to collaborate with divisional peers. This would ensure that diverse divisions within CCS collaborate to deliver quality services.

The third challenge faced by CCS is a lack of trustworthy information flow within departments. The fact that communication is designed to fulfill several goals necessitates consistency in the manner in which information travels from one person to the next. For instance, staff in one department may forget to send vital information that should be utilized by personnel in other departments to complete specified responsibilities. The CCS should ensure a continuous flow of information from one department to the next. This can be accomplished by establishing a communication protocol that allows employees to know with whom they should communicate in order to get specific issues resolved.

Lack of Engagement with the Issues

If the problem of providing timely information to overseas clients is not resolved, the majority of them will depart the organization and seek services elsewhere. In addition, failure to address the issue could cause overseas clients to feel uneasy. This is because they require knowledge about their consumers, and when they do not receive it, they experience anxiety (Kumar, 2010).

Failure to address the problem of silo mentality could have severe ramifications for CCS, as it would make it challenging for worldwide clientele to comprehend what occurs at CCS. As a result, individuals would be unable to receive the intended services, and they would decide to seek assistance from other groups. Such a move would be detrimental to CCS because the organization's clients are its lifeblood. Therefore, it is crucial to address this issue at CCS to prevent such dire repercussions.

Installation of New Hardware and Software

Specific hardware and software that would increase service delivery should be implemented in order for CCS to resolve its communication barrier issues. The organization has functional pagers, phones, and computers in terms of its gear. However, hardware alone is unable to solve the communication barrier issue.

When critical information is required, the organization should acquire specialist hardware to aid in tracking physicians and other staff personnel. For instance, touch-sensitive technology might be useful for retrieving information belonging to international clients in the absence of staff of specific departments. CCS can employ specialist software such as Client Data Administration System (CDAS), which handles client-related data within enterprises, to ensure that foreign clients receive all the information they require without delay (Haddon, 2004).

Effectively store, maintain, and retrieve client-related data is a capability of CDAS. The program is capable of storing and managing medical prescriptions and client profiles (Reeves, 2008). This program would ensure that all patient records are kept up-to-date and that family members can obtain requested information without delay. Cerner software is the other sort of software that can be utilized to improve service delivery at CCS. This type of software facilitates the electronic storage of records. The program is transportable and applicable in all fields of medical research, billing, medication/pharmacy management, and patient care (Kramer, 2012). This program would enable the staff to access patient records at any time and communicate with relevant coordinators or physicians for vital information via a messaging system (Findley, 2008).

Cultural Issues

In order to tackle the challenges at CCS, some cultural concerns must be addressed. Some individuals do not believe in the power of medicine to cure diseases, therefore they rely on the sheikh, who is seen as a knowledgeable imam or man who administers therapy based on religious quotations from the Quran and home medicines (Clausen, 2006). The second cultural issue is that people from various cultures have diverse views on health-related topics. Several cultures, for instance, favor traditional medicine above contemporary treatment. American herbal supplement St. John's wort, or Hypericum perforatum, is an example of traditional medicine. Thirdly, some individuals place a great deal of significance on family and religious beliefs (Jcaho, 2004). In light of this, they feel that one must be at harmony with nature in order to be healthy. This might alter how CCS handles individuals in this category.

Conclusion

Once a plan to address communication barrier issues at CCS has been executed, it will be necessary to evaluate its effectiveness. First, success would be measured by conducting periodic assessments to see whether the organization's service delivery has improved. For instance, overseas customers would be asked if they receive the desired information without delay. The second criterion for measuring performance would be whether there is an improvement in communication across different divisions (Sapsford, 2006). This would be accomplished by asking employees in various departments whether they receive the necessary information. In addition, staffing would be evaluated based on whether or not allocated tasks are accomplished on schedule. The work plan would be evaluated by comparing the realized results to the organization's stated objectives. The accomplishment of predetermined targets would show the work plan's success.

References

Clausen, L. (2006). Intercultural Organizational Communication was published by the Copenhagen Business School Press in Copenhagen.

Methods of data collecting (2012). Web.

Findley, Thomas (2008). Cultural Competence of Hospital-Bedside Nurses New York City: ProQuest

Haddon, L. (2004). Technologies of Information and Communication in Everyday Life. Berg in New York

Communication's significance within an organization (2012). Web.

Hospital Patient Assessment: Meeting the Challenges, by M. Jcaho, 2004. Joint Commission Resources in New York

Kramer, H. (2012). Cerner, a provider of health care IT, is a game-changer. Web.

Kumar, R. (2010). Research Methodology: A Step-by-Step Introduction. Sage, headquartered in New York

Leistner, F. (2012). Connecting Organizational Silos. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

S. Reeves (2008). Web-based qualitative research methodology: ethnography

R. Sapsford, Survey Research, New York: Sage, 2006.

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Employee Turnover In The UAE College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Abstract Literature Review The study's reasoning and hypotheses Research Methodology Conclusion References

Abstract

Globally, employee turnover affects all business structures, whether multinational corporations or small and medium-sized businesses. This study aims to analyze the reasons and consequences of high staff turnover rates in various UAE business sectors. As the independent variables, organizational culture and work satisfaction will be studied as potential causes of employee turnover.

The turnover rate, on the other hand, will serve as the dependent variable. Utilizing interviews and questionnaires, data will be obtained using a quantitative research methodology. The study will recruit 160 participants, including 120 employees and 40 managers from various Dubai-based firms in the health, education, financial, and energy sectors. Different research questions and two hypotheses will be prepared for the study based on the topic of employee turnover. This study's significance lies in its ability to give firms with evidence-based data and outcomes that can be utilized to strategically plan staff retention measures in order to minimize excessive turnover rates.

Introduction

Turnover is one of the greatest difficulties facing modern organizations, as it severely impacts performance. In recent years, incidences of employee turnover have increased in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Therefore, this research study will investigate the causes and effects of employee turnover rates in several UAE-based companies. The findings of this study are significant because they shed insight on the nature of this problem. Human resources management (HRM) teams can use this knowledge to lower employee turnover rates and enhance organizational performance.

Currently, the UAE relies heavily on expatriate labor, making recruitment and training expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, businesses cannot afford to lose employees owing to human resource management problems that can be resolved through research. Job satisfaction, salary packages, poor career prospects, the management-employee interaction, leadership style, and organizational culture are the primary factors of high turnover rates in organizations.

Therefore, the UAE is now experiencing high staff turnover rates, and this study will analyze the reasons and consequences of such a phenomena across the region's enterprises. Human resources will be able to evaluate the efficacy of their employee retention tactics based on their comprehension of the problem's causes and its effects on enterprises. Through surveys and interviews, the quantitative research methodology will be employed to collect data. Staff turnover is the dependent variable, whereas job satisfaction and company culture are independent factors.

Literature Review

According to James and Mathew (2012), employee turnover is a global human resources issue that must be handled to enhance organizational performance. For example, between July 2010 and June 2011, the retail sector in Malaysia witnessed 18 percent staff turnover (Nair, Salleh, & Nair, 2014). Employee turnover is characterized by employees leaving a company for a variety of reasons.

Labor is one of the most significant production components; therefore, when people leave, productivity and profitability suffer. According to human capital theory, employees are vital assets that play a significant influence in the success of a firm (Zulu, Chetty, & Karodia, 2017). The character of the work environment that employees enjoy in the course of doing their jobs is determined by the organizational culture.

In a research to determine the causes and effects of staff turnover in South African non-profit organizations, Zulu et al. (2017) discovered that a lack of training and career development opportunities greatly contributed to this issue. Employees will remain with a company that provides opportunities for career progress, but they will depart if such opportunities are unavailable. The rate of employee turnover in an organization is determined by workplace factors such as autonomy, social support, job stress, and pay scale, according to James and Mathew (2012).

In a separate study conducted by Liu, Cai, Li, Shi, and Fang (2013), the leadership style, which is a component of organizational culture, was found to influence employee turnover. The leader-member exchange (LMX) theory, which investigates the relationship between leaders and employees, is ingrained in the leadership style adopted inside an organization and strongly influences turnover intentions. Abu Elanain (2014) says that employees are more likely to remain in a business if they have a healthy relationship with management and leadership. However, they are likely to leave if the two engage in fighting. Ultimately, organizational culture is strongly related to job satisfaction, which is another key factor that contributes to high employee turnover rates.

Job satisfaction is a product of organizational culture elements, such as LMX, remuneration terms, career advancement prospects, organizational commitment, remuneration, job stress, and leadership style, which all contribute to employee turnover (James & Mathew, 2012; Zulu et al., 2017; Liu et al., 2013; Abu Elanain, 2014). The issue of high personnel turnover has major detrimental effects on an organization's performance.

According to Zulu et al. (2017), employee turnover results in decreased productivity and increased operational costs, impacting the profitability and viability of firms. The human capital available to a company or institution determines its productivity. As a result, when employees depart a company, output capacity declines. In addition, the labor gaps left by such personnel must be addressed by hiring replacements, which adds operational expenses.

The procedure negatively impacts the profitability and sustainability of the involved organizations. This research will apply the LMX theoretical framework to investigate the connection between supervisors and subordinates as part of an organizational culture that impacts job satisfaction and eventually contributes to employee turnover.

The study's reasoning and hypotheses

The significance of conducting this study is twofold. First, the study will develop a comprehensive understanding of the causes of employee turnover in various UAE-based organizations. To effectively address an issue, its causes must be well comprehended so that problem-specific intervention methods can be designed. Thus, the intervention approaches will be effective, and the likelihood of achieving favorable outcomes will increase dramatically.

Companies in the UAE will adopt evidence-based ways to address the problem of high employee turnover rates, making the suggested study significant. Second, the study will address knowledge gaps about worker turnover in the region. Current research on this topic focuses on a single industry, such as the oil industry or the financial sector. Consequently, the existing research lacks comprehensive cross-sectoral and comparative data on employee turnover in the UAE. This research will collect information from the health, oil, financial, and education sectors.

Therefore, the collected data will be utilized to determine whether this problem's causes are shared across industries or unique to certain sectors. This knowledge will be essential for HR managers in many industries who are tasked with developing employee retention strategies to combat staff attrition.

The research will aim to answer a number of concerns regarding corporate culture, job satisfaction, and the effects of employee turnover. The questions include –

What factors contribute to staff turnover in the UAE's health, education, energy, and finance sectors?

What is the relationship between LMX and the likelihood of employee turnover? What impact does compensation play in employee turnover? What effects does staff turnover have on the performance, productivity, profitability, and sustainability of an organization?

A diagrammatic representation of the study hypotheses is shown in Figure 1.

Research Methodology

Participants – This study's participants will fall into two categories. The first one will consist of 120 employees from various Dubai-based health, oil, education, and financial companies. Each sector will give thirty volunteers of various ages and genders, both domestic and international. The second category will consist of 40 managers, 10 from each of the indicated industries. Study Design — An explanatory research approach will be utilized. Depending on the availability and preferences of the participants, data will be collected via questionnaires and interviews. This study design was selected because it is simple to measure data and provide results using objective data in a clear manner. Participants can provide biased information, which is one of the weaknesses of this study design, especially the data collection phase. Measurements — Five-point Likert-type scales (range from 1 to 5) will be used to assess organizational culture-related variables, such as possibilities for career advancement, decision-making policy, organizational justice and fairness, leadership style, and turnover intentions. The same scales will be used to measure job-satisfaction-related variables such as LMX, role ambiguity, role conflict, compensation, and reward systems. Procedure – The initial phase will entail sending individuals letters requesting their consent to participate in the study. Those who provide informed consent will indicate whether they prefer interviews or questionnaires to provide information. A convenient date will be set for the interviews. The questionnaires will be delivered by email. The hypotheses will be examined statistically using SPSS for data analysis. SPSS utilizes central tendency metrics, such as the mean and standard deviation. In the process of analyzing the strength of the association between various variables, correlation and regression analysis will also be employed.

Conclusion

Literature indicates that staff turnover rates are significant in a variety of UAE economic sectors. This study will investigate the causes and effects of employee turnover in four economic sectors in the UAE, including the education, health, oil, and finance sectors. Inadequate salary and organizational culture, which lead to job discontent, are two of the key causes of high employee turnover rates. Ultimately, employees leave their jobs, resulting in significant turnover rates. Participants will be recruited from the mentioned industries, and questionnaires and interviews will be used to collect data. To evaluate the hypotheses, the data will be analyzed using SPSS and regressive analysis.

References

Abu Elanain, H. M. (2014). Leader-member exchange and intention to leave: Testing a mediated-effects model in a context with high turnover. Management Research Review, 37(2), pages 110 to 129.

James, L., and L. Mathew (2012). IT industry employee retention techniques. 9(3), 79-87, SCMS Journal of Indian Management.

Liu, Z., Cai, Z., Li, J., Shi, S., & Fang, Y. (2013). A social identity approach on leadership style and employee turnover intentions 18(3), pp. 305-324 in Career Development International.

Nair, M. S., Salleh, R., & Nair, S. K. (2014). The Malaysian retail sector has a high turnover rate. Global Business and Management Research, volume 6, number 4, pages 283-289.

Zulu, K., Chetty, N., & Karodia, A. M. (2017). Impact of personnel turnover on organizational performance: A case study of three Verulam non-profits (Republic of South Africa). Arabian Journal of Business and Management Review, Oman Chapter, 6(11), pp. 1-13.

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Business Environment And Organisation College Admission Essay Help

Introduction

This study intends to describe the nuances of the business environment and how it influences the operations of a company entity. Business environment refers to the external conditions and influences that affect commerce. It can be divided into two categories: internal and external. The internal environment includes a company's employees, management, and stakeholders, as well as its premises and equipment. The external environment of a firm consists of its suppliers, rivals, customers, and most crucially, the government, bilateral trade agreements, and quotas.

This study will investigate the effects of international commerce and the European dimension on British enterprises. In the United Kingdom, we shall focus on the importance of international trade, economic integration, and global markets. Similar consideration is given to the influence of two microeconomic policies and the global economy on organizations and stakeholders situated in the United Kingdom.

For any organization, whether for profit or not, to run effectively and in accordance with its goals, it must have a well-considered and executable design and structure. Organizational structure and design are interdependent. A corporation or institution's organizational structure is the framework within which it plans and performs its everyday activities or processes. Human resource management is the process of organizing and controlling human resources, communication, technology, and other inputs. In order for an organization to establish a structure, it must employ a flexible layout. A good design must assist an organization in achieving its objectives. Typically, the staff discusses the organization's needs and then develops a rubric to suit those needs. To realize a successful organizational structure, quality designs and a concerted effort by the labor force are necessary (Burton et al, 2006).

In the second section of this paper, we will describe and explore certain organizational management difficulties. We will conduct a detailed analysis of Unilever's business environment. Unilever is a well-known company whose headquarters are located in the United Kingdom. It has numerous investments and economic activities that span the globe. Unilever is involved in Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG). Standard-of-living essentials are fast-moving consumer goods (FMCGs). Examples include soaps, body lotions, beauty items, tea leaves, tissue papers, and cooking fats.

Unilever is the most reputable and well-known player in the FMCG industry. Since it deals with the manufacture, distribution, and final sale of life's most necessary commodities and operates in numerous nations, it is the best firm to use for a case study on the business environment. The company's history reveals that it is the result of a merger of two companies established in the United Kingdom and the Netherlands. This foundation has two headquarters, one in the United Kingdom and the other in the Netherlands. This has led to the simplification of the organizational structure.

Task 1: Determine the Importance of International Trade and the European Aspect for British Businesses

Importance of overseas commerce, economic integration, and worldwide markets for UK businesses.

International trade is the cross-border exchange of commodities and services. This type of business has a solid base in the contemporary business world because manufacturers and distributors seek to profit from a larger market than their own. Each and every business that want to cast a wide net must globalize its marketing and distribution activities. As a result of economic integrations and bloc formations, standardizations and trade barriers have become ingrained obstacles to entering international trade.

Numerous economies have realized that they cannot effectively compete using a "go-it-alone" strategy. Consequently, regional economies are increasingly merging to build larger economies. This grouping and regrouping of states has a significant effect on the social, political, and most importantly economic aspects of organizations. There are several benefits and drawbacks associated with this integration. Any corporation desiring these benefits and prepared to assume the associated risks will accept these difficulties and profit from the global market's bounty. As with any other multinational corporation, Unilever's presence on the global market has contributed to the formation of new market segments.

In order to take advantage of economies of scale, the company shakes off the European home market's saturation by catering to the needs of foreign customers. Considering the resources and products in the corporation's portfolio, international trading is also crucial. Unilever employs a variety of internationalization strategies to capitalize on these undeniable advantages of worldwide trading. Mergers and acquisitions have provided the firm with a significant stepping stone in its foray into international trade. Pepsico collaborates with the corporation to market and distribute Lipton, a ready-to-drink tea; Inmarko, the leading ice cream company in Russia; and the impending acquisition of the Sara Lee division of body and laundry production are among the many companies that have entered into international partnerships with the corporation. In a summary, the organization has successfully completed twenty acquisitions.

The essence of economic integration is the merging of monetary and financial norms and laws between two or more formerly independent parties with similar objectives. It is a concerted effort to push for improved trade terms and increase efficiency among members and non-members. It entails drafting engagement agreements and establishing conditions that enterprises must follow. It is also intended to regulate competition. The European Union is a prime example of economic integration (EU). Although the E.U. is perceived as a political organization, its establishment was motivated by an economic aim. The majority of its members are Europeans who have ratified the organization's statutes.

Unilever is a multinational corporation built on the aforementioned characteristics. This is justified by the company's presence in numerous countries and its employment of coordinated brands on the worldwide market. A centralized office in the United Kingdom controls the company's whole strategy. Unilever's income and operations will ultimately be impacted by the European Union's policy regarding tariffs and free trade agreements. The reduction of trade restrictions and impediments on the European market will result in a gain in revenue due to easier penetration into domestic markets. The elimination of all trade tariffs is one of the corporation's greatest advantages.

The influence of two microeconomic policies and the global economy on organizations and stakeholders in the United Kingdom.

Thus far, microeconomic interventions have been effective in bringing about structural changes in the organizations of the United Kingdom. These policies are the kind of long-term alterations to the patterns of output production. Immediate improvements include a decrease in inflationary expectations and an increase in production and employment possibilities. The primary objective of microeconomic policies is to develop the operations of businesses, industries, and markets in order to increase aggregate supply levels. Because these factors indirectly affect the supply side of the economy, the United Kingdom's government has taken the lead in ensuring that efficiency, flexibility, and less expensive production are the norm of the day. By using modern technology for the production of goods and services, businesses are required to maximize efficiency and minimize production costs. Technically efficient organizations, such as Unilever, tend to minimize the quantity of resources required for a given production activity.

The government of the United Kingdom has endeavored to foster healthy competition throughout the nation. Microeconomic policies assist businesses in monitoring the conduct of competitive sectors, wherein all market participants are given the opportunity to compete with one another. There are several microeconomic reforms that use corporate structures and privatization as strategies.

The government of the United Kingdom has attempted to enhance microeconomic reforms so that long-term obstacles to economic growth can be addressed. Inefficient resource allocation, underdeveloped infrastructure, an unstable price structure, and underemployment of available labor could all impede economic growth. As a result, producers raise their prices and customers purchase inexpensive imported items, depressing economic growth. In order to achieve microeconomic goals, policymakers must eliminate obstacles to the efficient allocation of resources, which, in an ideal world, would be performed automatically by markets. In this instance, pricing measures in the United Kingdom have stabilized market forces but prevented the market from charting its own course.

Due to the increased competition caused by privatization and deregulation, businesses will be able to lower costs and boost production in an effort to maximize profits. There have been implemented competition policies and licensing laws by the government. Unilever has replaced human labor with automated systems in order to reduce production expenses. Some opponents consider this as a forerunner to national unemployment.

Microeconomic policies are extremely beneficial since they tend to foster competitiveness among market participants. Some businesses struggle as a result of competition, while others lower prices and progress toward the profit margin. Those who are unable to remain solvent leave the market. When a company's revenue yields a greater profit, it will invest and grow its operations. As a result, the company will require additional staff, hence increasing employment prospects and indirectly stimulating economic growth (Yip, 2007).

Economic repercussions of Britain's membership into the Economic Monetary Union (EMU)

The Economic Monetary Union is the adoption of a single currency by the member states of the European Union. This was accomplished through the establishment of a single European Central Bank and the creation of a unified monetary policy. Due to the economic ramifications, this adoption of a single currency has produced a range of contradictory responses. Some may argue that the implementation of EMU is unimportant because it concentrates solely on the financial services industries (Smith & Grant, 2003).

Critics of the Economic Monetary Union assert that combining economies of varying sizes will be damaging. This will result in the entire economy of Europe falling to the lowest common denominator. Simply put, the economic strength of the member states will be accomplished by achieving a balance among the participating economies. The economies that do poorly will drag down those that are regarded to be prosperous. Despite this dismal perspective of EMU, euro financial assets will ultimately be very desirable due to the elimination of exchange risk and improvement in liquidity. In addition, the stability of the macroeconomic climate is of great assistance in mitigating risks associated with financing and investments. The introduction of the euro as the unified currency in the European Union has undoubtedly increased price transparency. A user of the euro has no concerns regarding the use of a different currency (Smith and Grant, 2003).

On the area of the Union, businesses can confidently compare prices without fear of the actual value being affected by conventionally highly volatile exchange rates. The unified EMU area is externally capable of being self-sufficient and independent of Asian or American influences. Consequently, collaboration has a political impact. By continuously cooperating in the development and enhancement of the framework for the common market's policies, ill will between states will be eradicated, fostering better relations between nations. The enterprises of the European Union, of which our organization is a part, will boost their profitability by eliminating currency exchange transaction expenses. Other trade-focused advocates of this worthwhile enterprise assert that no money would be wasted due to fluctuating currency rates. Europe's ability to compete with the Far East and the United States is enhanced by its ability to trade as a bloc.

Unilever is recognized as a robust corporation with a lengthy history, notwithstanding the challenges that have been mentioned. It is an unquestionable fact that its future is without bounds. This is evident by how well organized and developed it is. It also deals with all of its stakeholders in a way that benefits both parties. In addition, because it operates in numerous nations around the world, it has always adhered to the rule of law when interacting with the various governments and doing its business.

Identify the mission and responsibilities of the organization; investigate its economic environment and behavior.

Vision, mission, and goals and objectives of Unilever

Almost everyone has undoubtedly ever utilized Unilever's items. Daily, almost two billion individuals utilize their products. Because of a well-articulated vision and mission statement, the company has been able to amass an enormous consumer base. The claims are supported by specific objectives and methods for achieving those objectives. The corporation also prioritizes environmental protection while concentrating on economic expansion. Unilever is one of the most successful global corporations of recent times because to its noble aim. Unilever believes that success is exclusively contingent on upholding the greatest levels of corporate conduct toward customers, workers, and the community. In recent years, there has been an emphasis on procuring raw resources in a sustainable manner. The areas in which Unilever operates have benefited immensely from the company's extensive corporate social responsibility initiatives.

Unilever's primary objective is to meet the needs of all people in the world. The firm anticipates the desires of its customers by responding creatively and aggressively to market factors. Because its methods are thoroughly anchored in the local cultures of the regions in which it operates, this company has a solid reputation. This has helped it grab and sustain an even larger global market share than its competitors. Its long-term success stems from its dedication to customer satisfaction and its goods' exceptional performance and quality standards. Staff and management work as a cohesive one and are eager to adopt and implement new ideas as soon as possible.

An analysis of the degree to which Unilever accomplishes its stakeholders' objectives.

This corporation's success has been linked to the soaring ties it has cultivated and maintained with a variety of individuals and groups serving as its most immediate stakeholders. Customers, input suppliers, and shareholders are its stakeholders. Other stakeholders include the government, regulatory authorities, society, academics, and individuals who are concerned with the corporation's products and their effects on customers (Jones, 2005).

This corporation accomplishes its goals through engaging its stakeholders in novel and diverse ways. Depending on their respective interests, several levels and methods of stakeholder participation are used. The corporation ensures that consumers' needs are satisfied as well. It continually dispatches its staff to the field in order for them to analyze and comprehend the diverse preferences, demands, and trends of its present and targeted consumers.

Additionally, the company hosts a number of meetings with local governments and civil society organizations. Changes in legislation, licenses, trade conditions, tariffs, and tax matters are the essential basis for involvement with governments. In addition, it collaborates with affiliated companies in a variety of fields, such as nutrition, and performs numerous research projects with the objective of enhancing its goods and market share. The most significant engagement with stakeholders occurs at the local level, then at the regional level, and eventually in the global arena. There is always room for improvement in global partnerships between intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. This relationship brings in much-required expertise and knowledge in a number of key areas, as well as bringing on board initiatives with a practical component.

This organization employs numerous methods to ensure the satisfaction of its stakeholders. Regarding environmental considerations, for instance, there is no doubt that the company has built a welcoming environment that will ensure the longevity of its operation. It collaborates with various partners to ensure the safety of the environment and provides education on the significance of preserving a healthy environment. In Kenya, for example, Unilever is utilizing its social responsibility capacity to plant more than a billion trees over the next five years.

The company protects and defends the legal rights of its consumers. Strong cooperation exists between Unilever and the governments and organizations it deals with directly or indirectly, such as labor unions. This organization involves its stakeholders because it is primarily concerned with protecting its lawful commercial interests. To ensure that its goals adhere to business ethics, the company supports the establishment of competition laws. In addition, it ensures that employees conduct themselves in accordance with the laws and regulations of fair competition (Jones, 2005).

This company is so committed to its employees that it fosters an environment based on mutual trust. This is why it offers its employees safe and advantageous working circumstances. It grants its employees all basic liberties.

Unilever's social responsibilities and the approach it employs to fulfill all of its social commitments

This company thinks that its personnel must maintain a constant level of corporate behavior towards consumers, society, and immediate competitors if it is to succeed. Unilever's operational standards are characterized by a high level of adherence to company norms, principles, and regulations since they are adopted by all employees. The corporation fulfills its obligations with a high degree of honesty, uprightness, integrity, and sincerity. It respects human rights with regard to its employees' employment and compensation by ensuring that their interests are always first. It not only respects the rights of its employees, but also those of persons and other businesses with whom it conducts business (Jones, 2005).

Unilever ensures that its employees comply with the laws of each country in which it operates. The corporation has committed itself to progress in a culture of shared trust and value, in which everyone is held accountable for the firm's performance and reputation. This company searches, employs, and supports competent applicants based on the academic merits, experience, and skills required for each advertised position. The administration is committed to ensuring the socioeconomic well-being of its employees, and to that end, it does not permit child labor or forced labor. The personnel is permitted to freely associate with one another and with others outside the organization. The personnel benefits from an efficient communication system and receives consistent consultation support from the organization's higher management.

On the other side, consumers gain from this company because they are given with high-quality, branded goods and services at predictable pricing. They are offered products of great usability and safety for their anticipated use. Prior to introducing a new product to the market, Unilever ensures that consumers are well-informed about it through advertising and branding (Jones, 2005).

Similarly, this corporation's suppliers have reaped substantial benefits because they have formed mutually beneficial working relationships with it and its other business partners. Unilever incorporates society into its corporate activities and guarantees it has met its social obligations to the entire community.

This company cares about the environment in which it operates because it is devoted to making continuous organizational improvements with an eye toward continuously monitoring environmental consequences with the goal of creating long-term sustainability. The company has implemented fair competition policies for its employees. They have a natural tendency to conduct themselves in accordance with the principles of free and fair competition in the performance of their duties.

The business maintains a high level of integrity because neither the personnel nor the management accept nor offer bribes. There is a rule requiring timely reporting of corruption to management. It maintains a high level of transparency because its accounting records are regularly examined and reported. The code of conduct is also reviewed, and those who violate it must adhere to the processes outlined by the joint secretaries.

This corporation has a management board that guarantees compliance with the stated principles. They also ensure that the outlined principles are applied precisely. In addition to making significant decisions, this board meets regularly to review emerging concerns and monitor the entire organization.

The company ensures that its consumers meet their nutritional, sanitary, and personal care demands on a daily basis. The firm produces brands that make people happier and more successful in life. Its primary purpose is sustainability, which serves as the business's backbone. Through the things it sells to consumers, it seeks to inspire individuals. The corporation is in contact with the community since it considers customer satisfaction to be a crucial aspect of its development. In order to achieve success, the firm maintains the highest possible corporate standards at all times.

Unilever operates in numerous industries, with nutrition, hygiene, and personal care being among the most significant. The nature of this company's operation elucidates the future duties it assumes. It collaborates with healthcare organizations such as the United Nations Children's Education Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization to promote its customers' healthy diets and living conditions (WHO). This firm has devised new policies that promote correct eating and educate consumers on the significance of using healthy products in order to deliver healthy nutrition to society. The organization participates in global hygiene-related campaigns. Through these programs, it has been possible to prevent on a larger scale a number of diseases associated to poor hygiene.

This corporation guarantees that the environment is appropriately managed by taking into account aspects such as agriculture, aquatic life, and water. It has also implemented effective marketing campaigns that sustain global fisheries and water conservation efforts.

How economic systems strive to allocate and effectively utilize Unilever's resources

Unilever's primary objective is to utilize available resources to maximize profit in the numerous nations in which it operates. Its multifaceted products and standing as a market leader in all other respects and obligations stem from a more profound origin. This company has expanded into the global economy and is acknowledged as a responsible member of society. Having occupied such a large area, this organization has been the primary target of companies that disagree with its commercial practices. Being one of the largest FMCG firms with geographically and functionally diverse interests. This company employs multiple economic systems to ensure that economic resources are allocated appropriately. It employs central planning in which the management determines and designs the production of the types of goods and services required by potential consumers. After identifying these products, they are manufactured and distributed to the designated regions.

The process of selecting the essential commodities and services on a global scale requires careful consideration and an appreciation of the exercise's complexity. Several individuals are frequently involved in this process, in which companies and suppliers are given production guidelines. This company has planners who estimate and plan the allocation of the necessary resources to produce the anticipated output. This company has hired a large number of individuals who exploit these non-human resources effectively to create optimal production and are compensated accordingly. The firm also controls the number of employees in order to budget for the salaries and wages they will receive. The purpose of arranging this allocation of resources is to motivate people to achieve maximum production. The management also determines the selling pricing for various commodities.

By utilizing a free market economy, the company always bases the prices and quantities of its products on the forces of demand and supply. The general public will generate demand and supply, which will subsequently set prices and output amounts. Both producers and consumers rely heavily on the ultimate market prices to determine how much will be produced, supplied, and purchased. Unilever's management does so for a variety of reasons, including the reward of an enterprise, providing enough information to producers and consumers, pricing that reflects costs and advantages, and the ease with which resources can be optimally allocated and utilized (Yip, 2007).

The corporation assumes the risk of creating goods and services with the intention of receiving a profit after sales. Additionally, there is a fundamental requirement to increase earnings and minimize expenses. To achieve this, Unilever relies on the superior market intelligence that enables it to source supply at low prices and strategically price its commodities. In addition, it features very efficient methods for systematizing manufacturing in the most competent manner and searching for economical resources. Constantly, consumers are in need of market-guiding knowledge.

This company must disclose the costs of the numerous products it is putting on the market. Prices are the focal point of any business because they send signals to both suppliers and customers. A product's price must be disclosed to consumers. The amount of money consumers spend on a product reflects its genuine worth and the greatest possible utility they may derive from it.

It is also noteworthy that Unilever continues to discover and innovate feasible new ideas for all the things it can produce. By doing so, it is able to increase demand for new items and generate larger and better profits. Additionally, the firm concentrates on acquiring and transporting the resources required to develop new items. When a range of complementary and substitutable products are available on the market, customers have various options for consumption, and competing enterprises must change their pricing and volumes to maximize profits and establish a foothold in the market.

The influence of social welfare and industrial policy initiatives on Unilever and the greater community.

The primary objective of designing industrial policies within companies is to define a plan of action that will provide assistance in accomplishing manufacturing- and industry-dependent development goals. These policies claim that market failures impede free markets, and as a result, many nations fail to meet their development goals. For this reason, the government can solve the problem of market failures by intervening and guaranteeing that competition is free and fair. Important industrial policies tend to favor huge companies like Unilever. The widespread acceptance and support for these policies stems from the fact that they give a more effective means of addressing market shortcomings. In order to address market failures, governments can improve access to high-quality information, bolster legal and institutional frameworks, provide enough infrastructure support, and provide commercial entities with the requisite environment for industrial and economic growth.

In an effort to prevent or eliminate market failures, planners prioritize industrial policies that encourage and maintain a level playing field. There are certain inevitable externalities that increase costs, and as a result, some actions are more vital and urgent than others because they try to reduce these costs and realize the benefits of economies of scale. There are a number of externalities, both internal and external to businesses and nations, that inhibit free and fair competition. Examples of these externalities include the reoccurring rigidity of the labor market and the insufficiency of funds for growth promotion. The cost of acquiring information is also a significant externality that inhibits free and fair competition. There are also industrial policies that focus on overcoming information externalities, thereby creating an environment that enables organizations to comply with international standards, engage in experimentation, develop new product lines, and gain access to new markets while expanding existing ones. Since Unilever makes effective use of industrial policies, it appears to enjoy a favorable economic climate in which producers can locate the necessary resources.

An efficient market economy that provides access to markets and economic capital promotes economic progress. The purpose of industrial policy is to support the industrial sector and its expansion. As a non-governmental organization, Unilever establishes vital circumstances for the total consolidation of pluralism and democracy in the nations in which it operates. Therefore, the improvement of non-governmental organizations has an effect on the growth of individuals and society as a whole. Social welfares are extremely significant to society since they lead to the development of initiatives that are individually beneficial and adaptable to societal needs. Projects that are useful to society should be entrusted to the private sector, which is close to society and understands its demands.

How Unilever's market arrangements vary from the ideal of perfect competition

Market structure is the method in which a business faces competition when delivering goods and services. Both extremes occur, depending on the market in which one operates and the type of items that are dealt with. The market structures that theoretically exist are perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and monopoly. It is impossible to determine which of these existing market structures dominates the Unilever products market. This is due to the fact that there is no clear distinction between them. However, perfect competition is a significantly different structure than the other three. A vast array of Unilever's consumer goods are distributed globally. Unilever is able to compete in all market arrangements with the exception of perfect competition as a result of its complicated organizational structure and extensive product portfolio.

A market is characterized by perfect competition when there are many sellers and buyers present. This indicates that no single player will have a significant impact on the market as a whole. In this market system, the presence, removal, or change in strategy of a distributor has no effect on price or demand. The market forces are permitted to operate in full force. In this market, customers perceive all products to be identical, resulting in indiscriminate product selection. However, this is not the case for the vast majority of home products. Consumers are quite discerning when choosing such products, particularly those that affect their health and attractiveness. The previously mentioned extensive array of Unilever household products influences the health and beauty of the final customer. These effects, whether immediate or long-lasting, are reflected in the product's advertising slogan: giving vigor to life. Considering the company's characteristics, Unilever is not the type of company whose market presence cannot be felt by both competitors and consumers. Therefore, it is a complete falsehood to assert that the market system in which Unilever operates is characterized by perfect competition (Yip, 2007).

When there are little barriers to market entry, monopolistic competition predominates. Therefore, a company's market existence will be defined by its inventiveness and capacity to overcome the few existing restrictions. These limits may not necessarily be pecuniary, but rather anything that can impede the expansion and performance of a market participant. Due to their small market share, the many companies operating in this type of market structure have little influence. Globally, Unilever's market share cannot be characterized as small because it is highly variable. Geographic diversity, typified by expansion and forays into emerging markets, is essential. The possibility of a tiny market share cannot be ruled out altogether, but it can be mentioned as a plausible possibility. This is visible in the penetration of new markets already occupied by competitors, as well as in instances where competitors are proving too powerful to cut into the corporation's market share. In this scenario, the products are highly distinct, allowing for easy differentiation between products from different companies.

The Unilever products are readily identifiable and readily available in a sea of household goods from which consumers can choose. Therefore, Unilever's marketing strategists must employ non-price competition techniques. Advertising is the most prevalent non-price approach accessible to Unilever in situations where its competitors offer near replacements for its products. The corporation's implementation of an ambitious research and development program has resulted in the creation of the most optimal innovative product designs. All of these features characterize monopolistic competition, one of the dominant market structures (Yip, 2007).

Oligopolistic market structure develops when a small number of enterprises control the market and thus generate the majority of market revenue. This is evident from its market share, which, according to the Fortune 500 list of the largest companies in Europe in 2000, placed it at the fifty-fourth position with revenues of $45 679 million. This dominant market share combined with tight European Union standardization regulations makes it difficult for new items to enter the market.

In contrast, monopoly implies that there is just one supplier. Therefore, no competition is anticipated. The lone provider determines prices, supply volumes, and quality control standards. This hypothetical structure is unlikely to prevail absent the influence of regulators such as governments and other bodies empowered by international pacts and agreements. High entry barriers make it impossible for new companies to enter the market. It is difficult to navigate the current market structure. Due to their ability to affect national security, it can only be found in government-distributed specialized products. Therefore, we can confidently assert that this structure does not exist in Unilever's goods.

In conclusion, all market arrangements besides monopoly are utilized by Unilever. However, the perfect monopolistic structure has less weight given that this company's market share is sufficient to fend off any possible high-caliber competitors. Any company interested in the production and distribution of household goods can only succeed by franchising with Unilever or merging with it. The reduction of trade barriers and restrictions by the European Union has resulted in the concentration of European resources, which has created both opportunities and challenges for mainstream organizations. It is a significant milestone for Unilever and other multinational corporations to see different regions enter into agreements to form trading blocs. By establishing regional offices, the typically complex management structure can be simplified. These regional offices will be based on predetermined blocs.

How market pressures and Unilever's response are related

Market forces are the demands and supplies that reflect all price-conscious sellers and purchasers of market-available goods. The desires of sellers and purchasers are at opposite ends of the spectrum. The seller will seek the highest feasible price, while the customer will prefer to acquire the item for free if possible. Since taking items freely is not possible, they want the lowest possible prices. With an increase in demand, the price is anticipated to rise, whilst an excess supply will cause the price to fall. Such diverse wants constitute endless market forces. Noting that market forces are only possible when there are no external interferences is important.

The previously mentioned diverse portfolio of Unilever products can be categorized as follows: detergents and washing powder, beverages, and butter and margarine. Daily demand for fast-moving consumer goods necessitates that both buyers and suppliers be attracted to these products. In fact, demand is projected to increase due to the world's growing population and rapid urbanization.

Every company's objective is to maximize profits and decrease cash outflows as much as feasible. Unilever, being no exception, has made significant efforts to remain competitive in order to maintain and expand its market position in both Europe and the global market. We are currently investigating the company's reaction to the dynamic difficulties posed by shifting market dynamics, as well as the impact on its revenue and long-term reputation.

The company makes a concerted effort to maintain its market share. The broad geographical diversity of Unilever's products is the company's greatest asset. This will be reflected in the final returns since the poor performance of one region is likely to be offset by that of another. In 2002, the firm operated in eighty-eight different nations to make this point. Each region's management teams have autonomy in decision-making so that the items offered for distribution in their various regions are tailored to satisfy the needs of the consumers. This great strategy enables both the avoidance of obsolescence and the delivery of the market's most relevant products.

Paying close attention to human capital presents a tremendous potential for the corporation's long-term strategy. This global organization believes that highly driven human capital will have a favorable effect on future prospects. For this reason, the company has invested in the development of its human resources through the recruitment and training of people with diverse specialties and credentials. To ensure that every talent in society is utilized, one can enter the company's incredible human resource pool via the graduate trainee program or direct entry for specific skills (Yip, 2007).

The creation and implementation of a well-detailed safety, health, and environmental policy is a noteworthy technique that may appear to be more welfare-based than economic. This has a lasting perspective and a broader scope than what is immediately apparent. However, this does have short-term benefits. A worker who is always safety-minded will provide better results than one who pays little regard to safety. It is also important to note that certain economic blocs, such as the European Union, cannot accept a company's products if it has not taken any concrete steps to conserve and safeguard the environment. The most recent example is the dedication to sustainable black tea sourcing that resulted from Rain Forest Alliance accreditation. Unilever's ability to launch its Rain Forest Alliance-compliant tea on the European market is one of the direct benefits of this tea's sustainable source (Smith & Grant, 2003).

The firm embarked on an aggressive growth strategy in the year 2000 in response to several years of dismal global performance. Next, we will review the precise action elements of the strategy. First, the confusion surrounding the vast number of brands was addressed by reducing them to the four hundred most essential core products. The removal of the failing brands from the market resulted in a 75% to 93% rise in sales of the leading brands.

Additionally, the company has been able to get into emerging markets by penetrating those already occupied by competitors such as Procter & Gamble, Nestle, and Kraft Foods. Unilever's capacity to conduct research and identify consumer wants trends is one of the company's most significant assets. With this knowledge, the response is to provide accommodations for them. As an example of this proactive approach, the most pressing issues in the world today are nutrition and weight. The majority of individuals are currently devoting their attention to healthier lifestyle choices. In order to follow this trend, Unilever acquired Slimfast, a company that provides weight management services and nutritional consulting. Globally severe competition has compelled the corporation's upper management to pursue acquisitions. Ben & Jerry, Slimfast, and Best Foods are among the top twenty purchases globally. This ability to undertake massive purchases and form conglomerates has put the company in a position to enjoy a competitive edge. The firm saved EUR750 in expenses and saw its operating margins increase by 15.7% in the first three quarters (Smith and Grant, 2003).

The conduct and competitive strategies of Unilever, as well as the role of Competition and regulatory agencies

Unilever is diligently collaborating with the Competition Commission to strike a balance between its earnings and legality. Given their differing motivations for promoting competition, it has been difficult for both parties to strike a compromise.

Competition Commission will always seek to ensure a level playing field for all industry participants. Additionally, it ensures that no one gets unfair advantage by penalizing the eventual consumer. To accomplish this, the commission closely monitors the interaction between market rivals and partners. Changes in the structure of organizations, including concentrations through mergers and acquisitions, are very useful for eliminating market competition. The recent planned acquisition of the body and laundry division of United States-based Sara Lee by Unilever is being assessed in accordance with European Union Merger Regulation.

The commission attempts to determine the eventual impact of the elimination of competing suppliers on the shelf costs of a variety of household cleaning goods. Through such a strategy, the business is able to avoid the costs that would have occurred from intense competition and advertising. Nonetheless, if this is perceived as an attempt to gang up on competitors and force them out of business, it will be deemed undesirable, and the commission will inform the appropriate bodies accordingly. Sanctions and license suspension may be the most severe consequences a firm can face if convicted. In spite of this negative view of the work of the Competition Commission, there remains plenty to be accomplished.

As part of its expansion strategy, the company has adopted a previously indicated path-to-growth master plan targeted at increasing its market share. Its unrivaled, vast infrastructure has played a crucial role in the nation's entry into emerging markets. The other strategy has emphasized internal management structures and the development of global leadership. Every member of the management team has internalized the concept of growth, resulting in a well-oiled management machine. Only via the constant enhancement of organizational structure can quick decision making and enhanced accountability be achieved (Jones, 2005).

References

Burton, R. M., DeSanctis, G., and Obel, B. (2006). A Step-by-Step Approach to Organizational Design. Cambridge University Press in New York

Jones, G. (2005). Renewing Unilever: Tradition and Transformation Oxford University Press, London.

Smith, D., and S. Grant (2003), UK Current Economic Policy, third edition, Heinemann, New York.

Yip, G. S. (2007). An Integrated Approach to Global Customer Management Oxford University Press, London.

[supanova question]

WorldCom Accounting Scandal Analysis College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Avoiding Liability Understatement Timing variations corruption Illegal gifts Sources Cited

WorldCom (now known as MCI), the second-largest long-distance phone operator in the United States, is thought to have committed the largest accounting fraud in U.S. history. WorldCom is under pressure in the late 1990s to maintain its EBITDA or cash flow levels in order to preserve its share price as the company's orders decrease rapidly. This increased the pressure on WorldCom executives to engage in fraudulent and unethical conduct. WorldCom's total reported accounting fraud amounted to $11 billion. This research paper examines the WorldCom scandal in depth and recommends solutions to avoid similar frauds in the future.

Corporate environment refers to the extent to which fraud is permitted or prevented by corporate policies and procedures.

An organization's written fraud policy or manual specifies what constitutes inappropriate behavior and how a fraud inquiry will be conducted. It formalizes the company's approach to fraud management and demonstrates the management's intent to take such frauds extremely seriously and to deter their occurrence. A robust business policy must convey the notion that no one has the authority to commit illegal conduct. The fraud policy provides a framework for ethical behavior by all employees in all situations and describes the procedures that will be taken to combat fraud by both external and internal parties. The fraud policy shall outline the steps that must be taken in the event of suspected fraudulent activity.

It must contain the following:

A declaration of the company's intent to punish people who commit fraud. The policy should specify who is responsible for fraud detection, prevention, and investigation. Guidelines and procedures for handling fraud suspicions. Reporting and dissemination procedures for the results of fraud investigations. (Corderre13).

The accounting crisis at WorldCom proved that ineffective procedures were in place to prevent fraudulent transactions.

The extent of occurrence of each of the following categories of fraud:

Inappropriate asset valuation entails engaging in false inflation of asset values or other inappropriate appraisals, typically to enhance the strength and look of financial statements. This is accomplished through inflating accounts receivable, inventories, and revenue, as well as by underreporting fixed assets. Incorrect asset valuation occurs when assets are appraised either above or below their net realizable value or cost. If assets are overvalued or undervalued, net worth and income will be understated or overstated, respectively. For example, if an organization's accounts receivable or inventory are overestimated, its net income, working capital, and net value will likewise be inflated. (Montgomery & Majeski, p346). Fictitious revenues: This is a typical method used to alter financial figures, and it can take various forms.

More than fifty percent of all reported financial statement frauds involve improper disclosures within financial statements by recording false revenues. By improperly applying accounting techniques, revenues can be distorted. For instance, a sale can be recorded prematurely before the earning process is complete. Not only can fictitious revenues increase sales, but they also increase the company's net value and bottom line.

According to the following schemes, the prevalent bogus-revenue scam is perpetrated:

At the end of the year, products will be dumped with the normal dealers and returned to the warehouse. Channel stuffing Falsification of records not conforming to required accounting requirements Disguised side deals Backdated contracts make it easier to terminate a sale later. (Montgomery & Majeski, p345).

WorldCom improperly discharged accruals, resulting in deflation of current year expenses and inflation of revenues. WorldCom also reported exaggerated operational profitability by entering questionable revenue entries and omitting crucial information.

Skimming

This is often referred to as front-end fraud. Under this classification, funds are plundered prior to an accounting entry being created. Due to the fact that the money is stolen beforehand, it is extremely difficult to identify this scam. This form of fraud is prevalent in businesses that accept cash primarily, such as restaurants, bars, petrol stations, vending machines, retail establishments, and home improvement contracting jobs. Skimming is prevalent in Las Vegas casinos, as the owner himself engaged in it to conceal profits and avoid paying taxes.

Receivable schemes (Unconcealed schemes, lapping schemes, and write-off schemes), sales schemes (understated sales, unrecorded sales), and refund schemes are the three categories of skimming. A survey reveals that around 28% of all cash scams include skimming. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p120).

Underestimation of obligations

The understatement or omission of liabilities is a further example of an accounting fraud tactic. The income statement and balance sheet will be erroneous if liabilities are concealed. The general method involved in falsely omitting liabilities is as follows:

Investing in inventory Lawsuit settlement Transactions involving affiliated parties A liability is reported as revenue when it is paid in cash. Neglecting to record circumstances (Montgomery & Majeski, p348).

Timing variations

If financial transactions are recorded within the appropriate time frame, the financial statements' accuracy can be confirmed. The term for this is "matching principle." This indicates that the revenues and expenses of a given period correspond. If the matching principle is not adhered to, revenue and expenditures will not be properly matched. This is also commonly characterized as a "improper cutoff." Unquestionably, timing differences would result in material falsification of financial accounts.

Some examples of timing disparities include:

To report future revenues in the current accounting period in advance. Not accounting for current year spending or costs Deferring current expenses or costs to the future (Montgomery & Majeski, p347).

Bribery

Bribery is the giving, offering, soliciting, or receiving of anything of value to influence a business decision or official act. In many nations, bribery is accepted as a method of conducting business. Numerous managers, government officials, legislators, and even governments have been associated with bribery-related dismissals. Approximately $80 billion are spent annually on bribery and other forms of kickbacks, according to one study. In the 1990s, numerous Honda America executives were convicted of accepting bribes from local vehicle dealers. Lobbying is the acceptable form of bribery in the United States, where industries spend billions of dollars to influence legislation in their favor. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p112).

Illegal gratuities

There are similarities to bribery, yet there is no purpose to influence a commercial decision. In this type, an expensive gift, a free vacation, etc. can be offered to influence a business transaction or negotiation, but the gift is given after the transaction has concluded. For instance, a pharmaceutical corporation may offer incentives to prescribers of its products. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p113).

The Board of Directors' responsibility for avoiding, identifying, and correcting fraud-related issues.

Among the responsibilities of the board of directors is the establishment of strong internal controls to safeguard the shareholder's interest and the company's assets, including the detection and prevention of frauds, which are based on 1) building a proper control environment. 2) Implementing robust and efficient internal control procedures 3) Recognizing robust ethical standards and developing an acceptable code of conduct, ensuring that the audit committee operates independently, and reporting on the company's internal control systems to the board. (Gray & Manson 672.)

Internal auditors' responsibilities for avoiding, identifying, and resolving fraud-related issues. Conflicts of interest's influence on the frauds.

It is the job of management to establish and maintain cost-effective control standards. Internal auditors are required to conduct professional diligence. Internal auditors should have sufficient knowledge about fraud to recognize the indicators that fraud may have occurred, be alert to opportunities that could encourage fraud, evaluate the need for additional investigation, and notify the appropriate authorities, either the audit committee or the Board, if the CEO does not take action against such fraud.

The extent to which conspiracy between employees, managers, or others affected the frauds.

The organization should discourage collaboration between vendors or consumers and staff and make it abundantly apparent to customers and vendors that it has zero tolerance for fraud. To prevent collaboration between employees, managers, and top executives, a corporation should designate a fraud prevention officer or vigilance officer, as well as encourage and appropriately reward whistleblowing. (Albrecht et al 109).

The scam at WorldCom demonstrates that management was unusually optimistic and assumed unprecedented risks, including fraud. In order to commit this massive accounting fraud, the WorldCom accounting department, supported by management, turned to a novel technology or an escape route in GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles).

The level of complicity of the Company's external auditors and investment bankers in each of the frauds.

External auditors must avoid any potential conflicts of interest with their clients and avoid becoming business partners. In the event that the external auditor discovers fraud, they must qualify their audit report and present it to the Board. If the board does not respond within a few days, then the external auditor must resign, requiring the corporation to submit form 8K with the SEC.

External auditors Anderson neglected to submit WorldCom's significant findings to the Audit Committee.

The investment bank Merrill Lynch was punished for its involvement in the Enron crisis. There is evidence that investment bankers were aware that Enron's financial statements were deceptive, yet they nevertheless allowed investors to rely on them. Merrill Lynch was charged by the SEC for aiding and abetting the fraud in the Enron scandal. (Marnet 243).

The extent to which the Sarbanes-Oxley Act should lower the company's risk of fraud.

SOX was adopted by Congress in July 2002 in response to plummeting individual and institutional investor confidence, which was primarily exacerbated by accounting restatements and business bankruptcies. One of the primary goals of the SOX is to discourage corporate fraud by imposing severe fines and penalties for fraud and other violations. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act instructed the United States Sentencing Commission to adopt tougher sentencing guidelines for certain white-collar offences. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act increased the maximum prison terms for offences such as "attempt or conspiracy." There is little doubt that SOX's concentrated efforts will lower the danger of fraud in any organization in the future.

According to the 2003 SEC Report, WorldCom's management made many compensating accounting adjustments in order to meet the aggressive revenue targets set by both the financial community and the firm. Wherever there was a difference between actual and budgeted revenues, management made several accounting entries, primarily to conceal the difference so that financial goals could be met.

Specific advice to lessen the likelihood of future fraud in the affected locations. Address all applicable management levels and oversight bodies. Address the business environment as well.

The following are examples of fraud prevention and detection strategies:

To analyze and improve internal control strategies. To increase the concentration of senior management teams by establishing the tone from the top down. To provide training in fraud identification and prevention. To establish a code of conduct for the company To conduct reference checks on new hires. To give staff with ethics training. To conduct frequent reviews of fraud vulnerabilities. To encourage and reward whistleblowing. To retain the services of forensic accountants for fraud detection and prevention. (Rezaee 12).

The investors and general public lost billions of dollars as a result of WorldCom's management's inability to foresee and implement effective reporting and honest auditing. (Zekany 101)

WorldCom has been rebranded as MCI. The current management is attempting to revive the company both financially and morally. Currently, all MCI (formerly WorldCom) employees are required to complete ethics training. MCI is teaching its employees of all categories to avoid scandals and frauds at the corporate level by promoting a culture of candid and open communications at all levels, pursuing accurate reporting, being loyal to the management, and doing the right thing.

WorldCom paid $ 750 million in fines to the SEC (Stock Exchange Commission) as part of a settlement. As the CEO of WorldCom, Ebbers was charged with a fine of $8.25 million and 85 years in prison. Without a doubt, these deterrent fines and prison sentences will prevent future occurrences of WorldCom.

Sources Cited

Albrechit Steve, Albrecht Conan, Albrecht Chad & Mark Zimelman. Fraud Examination. 2009, London: Cengage Learning

Computer Aided Fraud Prevention and Detection, by David Coderre. John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2009.

Gray Lain and Stuart Manson. The Audit Process: Principles, Methodology, and Case Studies 2007: London, Cengage Learning

Marnet, Oliver. Corporate Governance and Behavior and Rationality 2008: New York: Routledge

Corporate Investigations. By Reginald J Montgomery and William J Majeski. 2005: Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, New York.

Rezaee, Zabihollah. Preventing and detecting financial statement fraud. 2002, John Wiley and Sons, New York

Singleton, Tommie, Aaron Singleton, Jack Bologna, and Robert J. Lindquist. Fraud Auditing and Forensic Accounting. 2006, John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Zekany, Kay E.; Braun, Lucas W.; and Warder, Zachary T. 2001's "Behind Closed Doors at WorldCom" Issues in Accounting Education 19.1 (2004): 101 and above.

[supanova question]

WorldCom Accounting Scandal Analysis College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Avoiding Liability Understatement Timing variations corruption Illegal gifts Sources Cited

WorldCom (now known as MCI), the second-largest long-distance phone operator in the United States, is thought to have committed the largest accounting fraud in U.S. history. WorldCom is under pressure in the late 1990s to maintain its EBITDA or cash flow levels in order to preserve its share price as the company's orders decrease rapidly. This increased the pressure on WorldCom executives to engage in fraudulent and unethical conduct. WorldCom's total reported accounting fraud amounted to $11 billion. This research paper examines the WorldCom scandal in depth and recommends solutions to avoid similar frauds in the future.

Corporate environment refers to the extent to which fraud is permitted or prevented by corporate policies and procedures.

An organization's written fraud policy or manual specifies what constitutes inappropriate behavior and how a fraud inquiry will be conducted. It formalizes the company's approach to fraud management and demonstrates the management's intent to take such frauds extremely seriously and to deter their occurrence. A robust business policy must convey the notion that no one has the authority to commit illegal conduct. The fraud policy provides a framework for ethical behavior by all employees in all situations and describes the procedures that will be taken to combat fraud by both external and internal parties. The fraud policy shall outline the steps that must be taken in the event of suspected fraudulent activity.

It must contain the following:

A declaration of the company's intent to punish people who commit fraud. The policy should specify who is responsible for fraud detection, prevention, and investigation. Guidelines and procedures for handling fraud suspicions. Reporting and dissemination procedures for the results of fraud investigations. (Corderre13).

The accounting crisis at WorldCom proved that ineffective procedures were in place to prevent fraudulent transactions.

The extent of occurrence of each of the following categories of fraud:

Inappropriate asset valuation entails engaging in false inflation of asset values or other inappropriate appraisals, typically to enhance the strength and look of financial statements. This is accomplished through inflating accounts receivable, inventories, and revenue, as well as by underreporting fixed assets. Incorrect asset valuation occurs when assets are appraised either above or below their net realizable value or cost. If assets are overvalued or undervalued, net worth and income will be understated or overstated, respectively. For example, if an organization's accounts receivable or inventory are overestimated, its net income, working capital, and net value will likewise be inflated. (Montgomery & Majeski, p346). Fictitious revenues: This is a typical method used to alter financial figures, and it can take various forms.

More than fifty percent of all reported financial statement frauds involve improper disclosures within financial statements by recording false revenues. By improperly applying accounting techniques, revenues can be distorted. For instance, a sale can be recorded prematurely before the earning process is complete. Not only can fictitious revenues increase sales, but they also increase the company's net value and bottom line.

According to the following schemes, the prevalent bogus-revenue scam is perpetrated:

At the end of the year, products will be dumped with the normal dealers and returned to the warehouse. Channel stuffing Falsification of records not conforming to required accounting requirements Disguised side deals Backdated contracts make it easier to terminate a sale later. (Montgomery & Majeski, p345).

WorldCom improperly discharged accruals, resulting in deflation of current year expenses and inflation of revenues. WorldCom also reported exaggerated operational profitability by entering questionable revenue entries and omitting crucial information.

Skimming

This is often referred to as front-end fraud. Under this classification, funds are plundered prior to an accounting entry being created. Due to the fact that the money is stolen beforehand, it is extremely difficult to identify this scam. This form of fraud is prevalent in businesses that accept cash primarily, such as restaurants, bars, petrol stations, vending machines, retail establishments, and home improvement contracting jobs. Skimming is prevalent in Las Vegas casinos, as the owner himself engaged in it to conceal profits and avoid paying taxes.

Receivable schemes (Unconcealed schemes, lapping schemes, and write-off schemes), sales schemes (understated sales, unrecorded sales), and refund schemes are the three categories of skimming. A survey reveals that around 28% of all cash scams include skimming. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p120).

Underestimation of obligations

The understatement or omission of liabilities is a further example of an accounting fraud tactic. The income statement and balance sheet will be erroneous if liabilities are concealed. The general method involved in falsely omitting liabilities is as follows:

Investing in inventory Lawsuit settlement Transactions involving affiliated parties A liability is reported as revenue when it is paid in cash. Neglecting to record circumstances (Montgomery & Majeski, p348).

Timing variations

If financial transactions are recorded within the appropriate time frame, the financial statements' accuracy can be confirmed. The term for this is "matching principle." This indicates that the revenues and expenses of a given period correspond. If the matching principle is not adhered to, revenue and expenditures will not be properly matched. This is also commonly characterized as a "improper cutoff." Unquestionably, timing differences would result in material falsification of financial accounts.

Some examples of timing disparities include:

To report future revenues in the current accounting period in advance. Not accounting for current year spending or costs Deferring current expenses or costs to the future (Montgomery & Majeski, p347).

Bribery

Bribery is the giving, offering, soliciting, or receiving of anything of value to influence a business decision or official act. In many nations, bribery is accepted as a method of conducting business. Numerous managers, government officials, legislators, and even governments have been associated with bribery-related dismissals. Approximately $80 billion are spent annually on bribery and other forms of kickbacks, according to one study. In the 1990s, numerous Honda America executives were convicted of accepting bribes from local vehicle dealers. Lobbying is the acceptable form of bribery in the United States, where industries spend billions of dollars to influence legislation in their favor. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p112).

Illegal gratuities

There are similarities to bribery, yet there is no purpose to influence a commercial decision. In this type, an expensive gift, a free vacation, etc. can be offered to influence a business transaction or negotiation, but the gift is given after the transaction has concluded. For instance, a pharmaceutical corporation may offer incentives to prescribers of its products. (Singleton, Bologna & Lindquist, p113).

The Board of Directors' responsibility for avoiding, identifying, and correcting fraud-related issues.

Among the responsibilities of the board of directors is the establishment of strong internal controls to safeguard the shareholder's interest and the company's assets, including the detection and prevention of frauds, which are based on 1) building a proper control environment. 2) Implementing robust and efficient internal control procedures 3) Recognizing robust ethical standards and developing an acceptable code of conduct, ensuring that the audit committee operates independently, and reporting on the company's internal control systems to the board. (Gray & Manson 672.)

Internal auditors' responsibilities for avoiding, identifying, and resolving fraud-related issues. Conflicts of interest's influence on the frauds.

It is the job of management to establish and maintain cost-effective control standards. Internal auditors are required to conduct professional diligence. Internal auditors should have sufficient knowledge about fraud to recognize the indicators that fraud may have occurred, be alert to opportunities that could encourage fraud, evaluate the need for additional investigation, and notify the appropriate authorities, either the audit committee or the Board, if the CEO does not take action against such fraud.

The extent to which conspiracy between employees, managers, or others affected the frauds.

The organization should discourage collaboration between vendors or consumers and staff and make it abundantly apparent to customers and vendors that it has zero tolerance for fraud. To prevent collaboration between employees, managers, and top executives, a corporation should designate a fraud prevention officer or vigilance officer, as well as encourage and appropriately reward whistleblowing. (Albrecht et al 109).

The scam at WorldCom demonstrates that management was unusually optimistic and assumed unprecedented risks, including fraud. In order to commit this massive accounting fraud, the WorldCom accounting department, supported by management, turned to a novel technology or an escape route in GAAP (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles).

The level of complicity of the Company's external auditors and investment bankers in each of the frauds.

External auditors must avoid any potential conflicts of interest with their clients and avoid becoming business partners. In the event that the external auditor discovers fraud, they must qualify their audit report and present it to the Board. If the board does not respond within a few days, then the external auditor must resign, requiring the corporation to submit form 8K with the SEC.

External auditors Anderson neglected to submit WorldCom's significant findings to the Audit Committee.

The investment bank Merrill Lynch was punished for its involvement in the Enron crisis. There is evidence that investment bankers were aware that Enron's financial statements were deceptive, yet they nevertheless allowed investors to rely on them. Merrill Lynch was charged by the SEC for aiding and abetting the fraud in the Enron scandal. (Marnet 243).

The extent to which the Sarbanes-Oxley Act should lower the company's risk of fraud.

SOX was adopted by Congress in July 2002 in response to plummeting individual and institutional investor confidence, which was primarily exacerbated by accounting restatements and business bankruptcies. One of the primary goals of the SOX is to discourage corporate fraud by imposing severe fines and penalties for fraud and other violations. In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act instructed the United States Sentencing Commission to adopt tougher sentencing guidelines for certain white-collar offences. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act increased the maximum prison terms for offences such as "attempt or conspiracy." There is little doubt that SOX's concentrated efforts will lower the danger of fraud in any organization in the future.

According to the 2003 SEC Report, WorldCom's management made many compensating accounting adjustments in order to meet the aggressive revenue targets set by both the financial community and the firm. Wherever there was a difference between actual and budgeted revenues, management made several accounting entries, primarily to conceal the difference so that financial goals could be met.

Specific advice to lessen the likelihood of future fraud in the affected locations. Address all applicable management levels and oversight bodies. Address the business environment as well.

The following are examples of fraud prevention and detection strategies:

To analyze and improve internal control strategies. To increase the concentration of senior management teams by establishing the tone from the top down. To provide training in fraud identification and prevention. To establish a code of conduct for the company To conduct reference checks on new hires. To give staff with ethics training. To conduct frequent reviews of fraud vulnerabilities. To encourage and reward whistleblowing. To retain the services of forensic accountants for fraud detection and prevention. (Rezaee 12).

The investors and general public lost billions of dollars as a result of WorldCom's management's inability to foresee and implement effective reporting and honest auditing. (Zekany 101)

WorldCom has been rebranded as MCI. The current management is attempting to revive the company both financially and morally. Currently, all MCI (formerly WorldCom) employees are required to complete ethics training. MCI is teaching its employees of all categories to avoid scandals and frauds at the corporate level by promoting a culture of candid and open communications at all levels, pursuing accurate reporting, being loyal to the management, and doing the right thing.

WorldCom paid $ 750 million in fines to the SEC (Stock Exchange Commission) as part of a settlement. As the CEO of WorldCom, Ebbers was charged with a fine of $8.25 million and 85 years in prison. Without a doubt, these deterrent fines and prison sentences will prevent future occurrences of WorldCom.

Sources Cited

Albrechit Steve, Albrecht Conan, Albrecht Chad & Mark Zimelman. Fraud Examination. 2009, London: Cengage Learning

Computer Aided Fraud Prevention and Detection, by David Coderre. John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2009.

Gray Lain and Stuart Manson. The Audit Process: Principles, Methodology, and Case Studies 2007: London, Cengage Learning

Marnet, Oliver. Corporate Governance and Behavior and Rationality 2008: New York: Routledge

Corporate Investigations. By Reginald J Montgomery and William J Majeski. 2005: Lawyers & Judges Publishing Company, New York.

Rezaee, Zabihollah. Preventing and detecting financial statement fraud. 2002, John Wiley and Sons, New York

Singleton, Tommie, Aaron Singleton, Jack Bologna, and Robert J. Lindquist. Fraud Auditing and Forensic Accounting. 2006, John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Zekany, Kay E.; Braun, Lucas W.; and Warder, Zachary T. 2001's "Behind Closed Doors at WorldCom" Issues in Accounting Education 19.1 (2004): 101 and above.

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HS Company: Issues And Change Management College Admission Essay Help

Summary

This case study examines HS Engineering Company, which specializes in the production and sale of engineering tools. The company is a family-owned enterprise with locations in Leeds, Wolverhampton, and Oldham. Leeds is the primary location, while Wolverhampton and Oldham are secondary locations. Since family members have occupied critical roles in the firm's board and organizational structure for some time, the family has a significant impact on company choices.

It is anticipated that the market for engineering tools would evolve, with about 20 percent of the market located in diverse regions of operation, including the Far East. One of the locations operates in a highly unionized atmosphere. The expansion provides the company with an advantage to enter a new market where its products are in demand and where maximum revenues may be realized (Christopher, 2009). Organizational culture is a norm that perpetuates the institution's core beliefs, leadership roles, and everyday responsibilities. It contributes to the company's success by boosting employees' morale, emotional health, sense of belonging, and productivity (Cameron & Quinn, 1999).

The decline in engineering product sales in Europe could be ascribed to pricing differences between HS products and those from the Far East, which appear to be significantly less expensive. This has contributed to a sharp decline in the company's profitability, prompting management to consider relocating to a different setting. There are also employment concerns, as certain locations operate in a heavily unionized environment, which has led to the provision of adequate benefits for employees and their families. There are numerous reasons why an employee may indicate a wish to leave or remain with an organization. A contextual model of employees' desire to leave an organization identifies communication and upward mobility as factors that may impact an employee's decision to stay or depart. Diversification is a business strategy that aims to strengthen corporate culture so that the company remains successful and market-relevant. In addition, diversification focuses on merging multiple business divisions in order to maximize earnings while minimizing operating expenses (Knight, 2005).

When a business relocates to a new operational region, these standards have a significant impact. This is particularly apparent when discussing business leadership characteristics and practices (Dubrin, 2010). The new procedures demand sufficient training time for personnel who were accustomed to the old procedures. It is vital that the firm retrain its employees in this new development in order for them to reach the necessary degree of job satisfaction. Changes in the business environment result in leadership styles that depart from the status quo. This could result in implementation process disagreements between management and employees. When a corporation expands or contracts its area of operations, the leadership style must be adapted to prevent a significant discrepancy in performance levels (Cameron & Quinn, 1999). Changes to new processes necessitate the adoption of new ways for completing a variety of tasks locally and internationally; this ensures rapid adaptability to unfamiliar cultures and settings (Conger, 1992).

The HS organization's decision to integrate several of its branches could cause a storm within the corporation, especially on the employee side. This could be due to the move to new methods of work, which would need substantial time for staff to adjust. The company will need to realign its new strategies, technologies, and personnel, which will necessitate adaption. However, HS will experience less stress if communication is timely and directed to the appropriate individuals (Keegan and Green, 2002). The argument for this multi-channel marketing is that the organization's brand will become so ingrained in the minds of customers that they will always link it with the business. Today's businesses place less emphasis on their brand and more on client pleasure and care. Maintaining loyal clients for the goal of establishing a respectable market share becomes increasingly important as competition intensifies and change is accomplished.

Organizations can only achieve excellent business outcomes if they completely engage their people in terms of creativity and business-related interests. The environment to which employees are exposed determines their level of productivity. The setting should encourage employees to express their opinions. Power-sharing and working closely with small groups inside larger groups, as well as communicating and identifying common ground on which to build arguments, are among the most effective leadership techniques for addressing the challenge of the chain of command (Keegan and Green, 2002). The company's stiff competition could be attributed to the employment of antiquated communication systems. Good brand image and diversification could aid HS in maintaining the robust growth it requires amidst global market rivalry. IKEA and Wal-Mart, the largest furniture sellers in the United States, are examples of corporations undergoing reorganization and migration to worldwide operations (Moon, 2004).

References

Cameron, K. & Quinn, R., 1999. The Competing values framework for diagnosing and altering organizational culture. Upper Saddle River is located in New Jersey.

Christopher, K. (2001). Walt Disney Company Strategy Analysis. NY; Yale school Of Management.

Learning to Lead: The Art of Transforming Managers into Leaders, by J. Conger (1992). Jossey-Bass, San Francisco.

Leadership: Research Findings, Practice, and Skills by A. J. Dubrin (6th Ed.). Rochester Institute of Technology in New York

M. Keegan and K. Green, "Global Marketing Management," Prentice Hall, New York, 2002.

Knight, J. (2005). Internationalization Brings Both Significant Benefits and Dangers. University of Toronto Press, New York

2004. IKEA Invades America. Harvard Business School, volume nine, pages 1-13.

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Ethics And Leadership: Parmalat Report College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Events Summary of Parmalat's Fraudulent Activities Causes of Fraud Fraud Impact Lesson Learned References

Introduction

In 1961, Parmalat began as a modest family-owned dairy store and has now expanded to over 30 outlets in Italy (Dibra 286). This company was owned by Calisto Tanzi, who held the majority of the shares. It had a tremendous impact on the global market for agricultural products and the country's economy. Approximately 5,000 farmers supplied the enterprise with milk, while 39,000 were employed directly (Soltani & Soltani 222). However, due to poor management, this prosperous company fell bankrupt. The decline was primarily the result of family members circumventing internal controls to conduct fraud.

In late 2003, the Parmalat industry was rocked by a scandal when it was discovered that approximately $64 billion was missing from a Bank of America savings account (Dibra 287). In March 2004, this led Milan prosecutors to file charges against the organization's founder, Calisto Tanzi, his family, and a few other executive officers (Ogutu 2758). Consequently, the Italian branches of Bank of America, 29 individuals, and accountants from Deloitte & Touche and Grant Thornton were probed for three months until a verdict was rendered.

Following the admission that about $1.15 billion were missing from the dairy group's account, the persecutors were charged with false auditing, market manipulation, and regulatory obstruction (Ogutu 2758). Three employees were incarcerated for their role in assisting the fraud, and a lawsuit was brought against all implicated auditors. Despite financial difficulties, Parmalat is thriving on five continents at now. This study examines the occurrences, causes, and consequences of fraud, as well as the lessons learnt from the fall of the corporate empire.

Events

Fraudulent actions, which led to Parmalat's debt, began in the 1990s, when the corporation needed to expand (Dibra 288). In order to boost performance, attract investors, and propel the company into worldwide markets, the corporation's shares was made public. In 1991, the founder purchased Parma Football Club, which quickly rose to prominence but ultimately closed due to a massive loss (Soltani & Soltani 226).

Calisto extended his market internationally by founding the Parmalat milk company and acquiring stakes from rivals. He purchased the Odeon television network and launched a tourism business, which ultimately destroyed his fortunes. Tanzi invested approximately £130 million in the television channel network and sold it for a loss of £100 million (Soltani & Soltani 222). Due to these difficulties, the company invested using fabricated data, borrowed money from the bank, and altered its financial records to mask the losses.

Since 1992, the firm has advanced rapidly and acquired properties through fake deals. It acquired small businesses from the United States, Hungary, Brazil, Italy, and Argentina (Soltani & Soltani 222). From 1995 on, Parmalat was unable to support its own demands, despite the company's records indicating that it was generating profits in 2004. (Dibra 287). Several companies, including the Bank of America, were enticed to participate in the firm through private placements and bonds.

Italian law mandates that corporations change their external auditors every nine years. Therefore, Grant Thornton was replaced with Deloitte and Touche. As a result, the new auditor revealed irregularities within Parmalat. Despite this, Grant Thornton maintained its tight relationship with the business by facilitating unlawful payments. In addition, company leaders participated in producing fictitious debts and establishing fraudulent accounts from which the corporation could receive funds. Due to the falsification of Thornton's records, Deloitte and Touche rarely identified abnormalities in cash flow.

In 1999, the finance director of Parmalat committed financial fraud through the Delaware-based Buconero Company. This business delivered $137 million to the Swiss unit of Parmalat in exchange for a 6% commission and $7 for services rendered (Ogutu 2752). In addition to the use of Buconero, other offshore corporations, such as Shell, were used to conceal debts. In Latin America, the company was losing over $300 million annually (Ogutu 2752). However, its debts were removed from the company's financial records through the use of Caribbean shell corporations.

Concerns were raised over Parmalat's high debt levels in the late 1990s. For instance, Esteban Pedro Villar filed a warning report on the arrangement of Latin American Parmalat, which was deemed absurd. Some corporations, such as Argentina Deloitte's Parmalat, were dissolved and their accounts certified to conceal evidence following the exposure. In 2003, Wanderley Olivetti of Brazil filed a similar allegation over a bogus $7 billion transfer (Ogutu 2758). His warnings were likewise disregarded, and he was barred from handling the company's finances.

An Overview of Parmalat's Fraudulent Actions

A transaction between Tanzi, his son, and Blackstone Group, a private equity firm, in 2003 was the defining event that led to the disclosure of fraudulent actions (Ogutu 2748). The two sought to sell half of their family shares to the New York corporation, but discovered that Parmalat had no cash assets and just 3 billion euros listed in its annual report (Ogutu 2750). In addition, their debts totaled close to 10 billion euros. The Blackstone group uncovered the seller's fraudulent accounting records and disclosed them. This tragedy brought a stop to the dishonest practices in the dairy business.

Several American and international businesses were impacted by Parmalat Company's fraudulent practices. From 1997 through 2002, it sold $1 billion worth of debt securities through several private placements (Soltani & Soltani 233). On July 28, 2004, the company consented to a fraud-related action filed against it in the Southern District Court. The allegations include overstating the amount of cash and marketable securities by more than $4.9 billion by the end of 2002 and understating their indebtedness, which amounted to almost $10 billion throughout transactions (Ogutu 2749). These transactions substantially implicated the company in defrauding a number of U.S.-based investors.

Parmalat employed a number of methods to conceal its credit standing, including the removal of $ 1.6 billion owed by one of its nominees and the recording of $ 1.6 billion in debt as equity via a fraudulent participation agreement (Usman et al. 45). In addition, the company reduced $500 million in liabilities by designating the sales of receivables as non-recourse (Dibra 287). Additionally, the firm omitted $1.6 million in debts from its financial statements by mislabeling debts owing to banks as intercompany debt (Ogutu 2758). The secret debt prevented the company from growing and ultimately led to its demise.

In addition, Parmalat exploited nominee firms to compensate for losses generated by operating subsidiaries by conducting fictitious financial transactions. Additionally, it hid intercompany loans between branches with operating losses. The company eluded inspection since its accounts receivable were past due. The enterprise documented bogus revenue through sales conducted by subsidiary companies and sold at exorbitant rates to controlled nominee corporations. According to Dibra (288), properties valued at $500 million were moved to other Tanzi enterprises. This was done for the benefit of certain family members who desired to amass greater fortune at the expense of the other owners.

Motives for Fraud

Inadequate oversight of the working environment led to mismanagement and fraud. The investigation of issues was hampered by the fact that the CEO and chair were the same individual. In addition, shareholder interests were not adequately represented because the board had only three members, including the founder. Thus, the inability to separate the two positions contributed to the demise of the multi-billion dollar dairy business.

Auditors were supposed to conduct audits with care, objectivity, and skepticism. In the case of Parmalat, the leaders were liable for perpetuating the fraud since they failed to work diligently to prevent fraudulent acts. The government was illegitimate because it failed to create a fair working environment. There is no evidence that the organization's culture supported transparency and openness, which are essential to developing an ethical environment. It appears that the managers were more concerned with benefiting themselves from the company's riches than with being truthful.

Failure to create an effective and sufficient monitoring system is also a significant factor in Parmalat's decline. The company lacked an effective means of refining its governance framework and spotting instances of greed, power abuse, and fraudulent behavior. Although auditors such as Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and Grant Thornton International were blamed for failing to detect fraudulent activities, the majority of errors should be attributed to a lack of operational monitoring structures, as auditors, legal advisors, and some banks assisted the company in perpetuating fraud.

The senior management leaders of Parmalat had a crucial part in aiding fraud, as it was their responsibility to provide accurate and trustworthy financial reporting to the firm. However, they were responsible for the creation of nonexistent bank accounts and misleading information, as well as the maintenance of fraudulent records. Moreover, these managers were obligated to serve all investors and stockholders equally and without favors, yet they gave preference to the Tanzi family.

Due to the absence of an ethical work environment at Parmalat, employees were less concerned with the veracity of the company's financial accounts, which impacted operations and the company's financial status. In addition, the company's board of directors was not actively involved in the governance structure, as indicated by the fact that no action was taken after the Tanzi family's theft was disclosed.

The failure of auditors to do their duties as needed was crucial to the demise of the dairy industry. It was determined that around $5 billion in a Bank of America account did not exist (Usman et al. 53). The leaders had fabricated a confirmation letter for an account that did not exist and submitted it for approval. Although the auditors followed the proper procedures when confirming this bank account, they made a grave error by using the internal mail system of Parmalat. Employees of the company intercepted the request for verification and forgeried it by printing the letter on Bank of America letterhead. Due to the auditors' oversight, the confirmation letter addressed to the Bank of America contained a fax number with the incorrect area code and country code. This oversight led to an investigation and the exposure of the company's nonexistent bank account.

The non-executive directors lacked autonomy in carrying out their duties. Because he had worked for Parmalat for more than 30 years by 2008, it was simpler to influence the senior manager to make biased judgements (Dibra 287). Five of thirteen directors were unrelated to CEO and chairman Calisto Tanzi (Soltani & Soltani 232). Tanzi's son Stefano, nephew Paola Visconti, brother Giovanni, CFO Fausto Tonna, Alberto Ferraris, Luciano Del Soldato, and Franchesco Giuffredi were the executives descended from the founder. This framework makes it quite clear that power-sharing was unethical and a gross farce of strong and successful governance.

Fraud Impact

The fall of Parmalat, the ninth largest business empire in Italy, had a severe influence on the country's economy. This is due to the fact that some employees were sacked and the company lost revenue while settling legal concerns. By streamlining mechanisms that allowed fraud to flourish, the Italian government shifted its supervision function. This action was taken to restore the confidence of international investors and lure international financing prospects to Italy.

Parmalat was required to modify its corporate governance by implementing modifications that would promote compliance with the specified security legislation. It accepted change by adopting a code of ethics and a code of conduct for insider transactions. In addition, the company established a code of conduct that controls the actions of every employee. Additionally, the corporation opted to implement bylaws granting governance authority to an independently elected board of directors who serve for limited terms.

The failure of Parmalat negatively impacted both the world and Italian economy. All personnel directly involved in the affair were terminated by the temporary administration. In addition, a large number of individuals lost their jobs as a result of the company's reorganization efforts. The non-European countries also suffered losses due to the reduction of corporate subsidiaries and the number of employees. In Millan, the company's founder, Calisto Tanzi, and chief financial officer, Tonna, were sentenced for violating federal security regulations, while other officers accepted plea bargains; this resulted in a reorganization of the company's leadership.

The Parmalat Company was forced to declare bankruptcy at the end of 2003 after discovering a multibillion-euro deficit in their accounting. This compelled the Italian government to move fast and mitigate the farmers' losses. Enrico Bond was selected to replace Tanzi in accordance with a new rule referred to as extraordinary administration, which permitted the replacement of scandal-affected individuals immediately.

The new administrator devised a reorganization plan for Parmalat in 2004, which was approved by the Italian government (Usman et al. 42). Italian, non-European, and French farmers had not been compensated for milk supplied to a corporation that was billed 120 million euros (Usman et al. 44). The Italian government intervened to avert the total collapse of the largest food industry, which generates significant amounts of revenue. It suggested the establishment of three subsidy schemes with the governments of Lombardy, France, and Italy to compensate farmers who had suffered losses due to the firm's collapse.

Lesson Learned

The Parmalat crisis demonstrated the need for corporate governance to represent investors' interests in various enterprises. The company's management failed to build a rigorous monitoring and verification system within the governance framework (Usman et al. 44). This exposed the company to fraudulent activity and power abuse, which ultimately led to its demise. Therefore, the corporate enterprise must have devices for detecting workplace wrongdoing and dishonesty.

Corporate governance ensures business success and promotes social welfare maximization. Therefore, companies should strive to obtain it for auditing and disclosure, ethical management, and identifying effective executive directors. Although group control may not prevent unethical behavior in the executive suite, leaders may notice unethical behavior before it is too late. It was the norm at Parmalat for personnel with high moral standards to engage in activities that benefitted themselves at the expense of the business. A presence of team control may have prevented the power abuse and ethical inconsistency that led to the company's demise.

Parmalat's demise was attributed in part to the absence of a distinct chair and CEO. This situation has taught me that an organization's management and oversight can only be improved if its top leaders are independent from one another. The chair's responsibility is to evaluate the management's implementation of the strategy. On the other hand, the CEO must ensure that the board is involved in all relevant actions and strategies. One cannot simultaneously serve as CEO and Chair without putting their own interests first. It is therefore ethical and smart for a business to have an independent chair. This is due to the fact that the head becomes answerable to a visible leader and the interests of all stakeholders are represented in their entirety.

Compliance with government regulations is important and ethical since it eliminates revenue loss resulting from fines. Parmalat breached Italy's corporate governance rule, which mandates that a company be controlled by many shareholders. This regulation is crucial for accounting because it allows directors to be independent from controlling shareholders. Due to the corporation's failure to comply with this regulation, the company amassed large debts, which ultimately contributed to the industry's demise (Usman et al. 30). Thus, a fundamentally robust governance system is contingent on successful compliance with key authorities' norms and rules. In addition, it is ethical for organizations to promote accountability, good governance, and good citizenship in their operating region.

External auditors are essential to the monitoring, improvement, and maintenance of a company's compliance procedure. Generally, auditors are tasked with expanding, strengthening, and enhancing corporate governance. In addition, they ensure that an organization's internal control and financial reporting processes are efficient, appropriate, and error-free. However, Parmalat relied solely on internal auditors, who were unable to generate dependable data or approve accurate financial statements. In addition, the company was not compliant with applicable federal norms and regulations, which is essential for a successful governance process. The participation of external auditors would have aided the firm in tracking processes and identifying anticipated obstacles.

Individual moral integrity has a significant impact on the performance of a sector; hence, business executives must guarantee that their workforce possesses strong moral standards, values, and behaviour. Business ethics covers a company's interactions with consumers, stakeholders, profits, corporate behavior, and legal difficulties. The management of Parmalat had weak work ethics since their actions were defined by dishonesty and greed. This was demonstrated by the fact that they fabricated earnings, possessed nonexistent assets, and falsified financial records in order to deceive investors and creditors. Therefore, the existing executives of the company should concentrate on establishing organizational ideals that will guide the employees.

Sources Cited

Corporate Governance Failure: The Case of Enron and Parmalat, European Scientific Journal, vol. 12, no. 16, 2016, pp.

Corporate Failure and the Role of Governance: The Parmalat Scandal, by Emmanuel O. Ogutu.

International Journal of Management, volume 11, issue 3, pages 2748-2752, 2016.

The Inside Story of the Parmalat Scandal: Family Leadership. Handbook of Frauds, Scams, and Swindles: Failures of Ethics in Leadership, 2017, pp. 222-235.

Exploring the Links between Ethical Leadership and Organizational Unlearning: A Case Study of a European Multinational Company. Usman, Muhammad, et al.

Business and Economic Review, volume 10, issue 2, pages 29-54, 2018.

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Management Practices In Changing Business Environment College Admission Essay Help

Introduction

Due to the ever-changing business environment, the management methods of organizing, staffing, leading, planning, and controlling play a crucial part in any modern workplace. This is due to competition and the ever-increasing demand to achieve diverse organizational objectives. These management strategies ensure that an organization's operations run smoothly in order to accomplish both long-term and short-term objectives. These rituals are intricately linked in one manner or another (Kotter, 2002, P. 23). Therefore, they may be utilized efficiently to boost the efficiency and productivity of numerous staff.

As much as every firm may strive to guarantee that such standards are adhered to, the manner in which they are executed is what matters. In this instance, each business has its own method for applying these principles based on its existing procedures and methods. Depending on what the management feels to be the appropriate course of action, implementation may take on several forms. Given the importance it has played in the realm of business and organizational management, no organization can function without these management methods (Kotter, 2002, P. 53).

Therefore, these management techniques should be executed in the most effective manner possible to preserve and protect the organization's interests. As time progresses, different managers will attempt to devise more effective methods for adopting these management techniques to ensure their long-term viability (Robert, 2008, p. 45). This study will therefore attempt to analyze how these management strategies were implemented at my prior workplace, as I am currently unemployed. In this instance, it will be determined by examining how they were implemented in the real world.

Management practices

Despite the fact that all of these activities are interconnected in some manner, it is preferable to implement them separately for accurate evaluation of intended effects.

Planning

Planning as a management technique is the identification and evaluation of various human resource requirements that will assist the firm in achieving its goals and objectives. This implies that planning is centered on several human resources administrative duties. It must be realized that the importance of planning cannot in any way be minimized. Consequently, at my former place of employment, the management technique of planning involved anticipating various staffing requirements based on future growth projections.

The organization's expansion requires the planning of the amount of people to be hired to meet these demands (Price, 2007, p. 39). The management was able to plan for and reduce expenses by doing a thorough examination of the amount of people required to complete a certain task. In circumstances with a limited budget, training was conducted in advance to prepare for the inevitable upswing in business.

Good management practices must be able to combine strategic planning and processes to produce immediate benefits. The talents and skills of various personnel were meticulously documented to provide a clear road map for their optimization. Planning should foresee an organization's future needs to accomplish its goals and objectives, which may be subject to change based on shareholder demands (Robert, 2008, p. 73).

Planning as a management process is all about anticipating the potential need for new skills in the future by every business. In this situation, businesses should be able to evaluate ideal solutions that can be applied by decision-makers. The ability of my prior employer's staff to be in the right place at the right time is an illustration of their planning.

Leading

Leadership as a management practice is a crucial human resource factor that impacts an organization's level of productivity. Any workplace's leadership should be effective enough to steer the organization toward its goals and objectives. Leadership demands considerable operational expertise for long-term viability. For leadership to be effectively defined and implemented, managers must have a thorough understanding of the organization's needs and requirements, because you cannot lead what you do not know (Legge, 2004, p. 20). This ensures the participation of every employee, which increases efficiency and output. The leader must guarantee that the human resource function is well equipped and able to implement all employee-related issues.

This approach of management should ensure that all employees are engaged. The organization's value-creating drivers should be optimized to achieve success. This guarantees that individuals can work together to get a comprehensive picture of the organization. My prior employer developed leadership through human resource capacity building. Multiple organizations have implemented this in order to secure a good organizational structure.

My former employer, for instance, emphasized leading others as a management technique by mandating teamwork in the execution and planning of various human resource functions (Rebecca, 2008, p. 48). There were increased funds for human resource management to guarantee that every facet of leadership is considered as time passes.

Organizing

After planning has been completed, the organizational role of management addresses a variety of difficulties. Here is where several facets of human resources are combined. Human, monetary, and material resources are crucial to the organization of management procedures. This was effectively incorporated at my former workplace through the synchronization of functions. For instance, a manager is expected to carry out the management role of organizing by adhering to certain steps for maximum effectiveness (Legge, 2004, p. 96). Through effective organization, my former employer was able to attain success. My former employer practiced organizing by the most important role positions within the organization.

Management's organizing function is intended to center around coordinating existing responsibility and authority. Regarding management, managers are expected to organize things to get results. This implies that actions should be properly identified. These activities will be departmentally arranged in order to classify authority. For what is being arranged to become a reality, there must be good coordination between the authority and responsibility.

Interactions that arise during the process of coordinating numerous operations in an organization strengthen relationships (Price, 2007, p. 67). All of this is done to attain various organizational objectives. For success, proper implementation of organizing as a management technique involves extensive cooperation including all stakeholders.

Staffing

The focus of staffing is to staff various organizational structures. This is accomplished by the right selection of individuals who can effectively fulfill their given duties. My previous employer, for instance, did this effectively by identifying opportunities in a timely manner, thereby defining roles so that a suitable candidate can be selected through a competitive recruitment process. Staffing can also involve employee evaluation and development to produce a workforce that will contribute to the achievement of organizational goals (Rebecca, 2008, p. 48). Staffing should also be viewed as a critical management activity that must be effectively implemented in order to achieve organizational objectives.

Controlling

Controlling as a management discipline has two primary functions. It promotes collaboration and facilitates overall planning in this instance. Controlling ensures that everything proceeds in accordance with predetermined plans. This indicates that everything must comply with the provided instructions and established principles. Controlling ensures the appropriate utilization of resources, which is essential for a company to achieve its objectives.

For instance, my prior employer utilized risk control and assessment to guarantee that everything was proceeding according to plan. Controlling should be primarily concerned with comparing actual performance to expected performance for proper implementation (Legge, 2004, p. 51). This guarantees that all requirements for a proper evaluation of possible and expected outcomes are met.

Conclusion

These management procedures are intended to produce results, hence they should be strictly enforced. All of these approaches should concentrate on cutting-edge actions that ensure results. All of these procedures can ultimately serve as mitigating measures that guarantee the achievement of goals and objectives without incident. Due to the ever-changing and competitive nature of the corporate world, there exist disparities in management methods, and this trend is predicted to continue as time passes. As much as every firm is expected to deal with these realities of the business world, efforts should be made to adopt management strategies effectively.

Bibliography

Kotter, J. (2002). The Essence of Change Harvard Business School Publishing, Boston.

Legge, K. (2004). Management of Human Resources: Rhetoric and Reality Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Price, A. (2007). Human Resource Management in an organizational framework. Cengage Learning's headquarters are located in London.

Rebecca, K. (2008). Oxford, Oxford University Press, Introduction to Human Resource Management

Robert, C. (2008). Management: Individuals, performance, and change. New York City: McGraw-Hill

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Chery Automobile Company: Marketing Mix For USA College Admission Essay Help

Chery Automobile Manufacturer.

Introduction

Chery Automobile Company Limited, founded in 1997, is a Chinese company that makes and sells automobiles. According to Zhang and Ziajing (2013, p. 179), Chery, which has been China's biggest exporter of passenger vehicles for more than a decade, is en route to becoming a world-renowned automobile manufacturer. Today, Chery is known for manufacturing and supplying multiple brands, including Chery, Karry, Rely, and Riich (China Auto News, Auto Brands to Watch in the Chinese Market in 2014 2014). Its product line consists of minicars, commercial vehicles, and passenger automobiles. Chery capitalizes on the network marketing marketing strategy prevalent on the Chinese domestic market (Kerin & Rudellius 2000, p. 233).

Under these classifications, the corporation invests not only on the domestic market, but also in international markets to avoid unfair competition and internal friction, particularly in resource administration (Chery Automobile Case Study 2014; Chery China 2014). In addition, these types of categorization greatly improve the company's marketing capabilities, particularly through expanding the company's marketing network (Automobiles 2014). Chery's marketing network aims to cover both poor and developed regions through these efforts (Kerin & Rudellius 2000, p. 235; Daimler Chrysler approved to start auto financing in China 2005).

Through these strategic marketing networks, according to Davids and Susan (2004, p. 35), the company has been able to establish a formidable foundation for annual rapid promotion in marketing their products, advocating for quality services, expanding their marketing scope, and stimulating international product publicity (Alon, Fetscherin & Sardy 2008, p. 489). According to Davids and Susan (2004, p. 35), this type of stimulus is frequently anticipated to increase in stature through the implementation of three main tactics that the organization recognizes: service leap, quality leap, and brand leap (Mitchell and Chilkoti 2014). The purpose of these efforts is to conceptualize the Chery brand while emphasizing the standardisation of main product information, the delivery of product positioning, and its selling factors on the worldwide market (Sholnn 2007).

According to Qingfen (2011), this initiative also provides substantial benefits to consumers by aiming to meet their wants and exceed their expectations in the crowded vehicle industry (Janet 2002, p. 23).

Entry into the U.S. Market

To enter the American market, Chery Company must comply with the prevalent environmental requirements, which will allow it to capitalize on the United States' growing concern about global warming (Ramo 2006). As a duty of environmental friendliness, many companies have not been able to develop a strong foothold in the United States, and most Automobile products are frequently subjected to a certain level of scrutiny to determine their reliability, particularly in terms of product quality and safety (Wang 2007). Due to the strict federal policy in the United States, Skinner (2011, p. 182) asserts that the Chery Company has always had a great opportunity to offer high-quality automobiles with various characteristics that augur well with the American domestic consumer, including fuel efficiency and fair price experience, among others (Wang 2007).

Second, Chery Automobile Company has always endeavored to accommodate the American psychology by providing incentives and amazing product discounts for the average American consumer, while successfully rejecting the domestic American image of Chinese-made apparel (Wang 2007). In essence, Chery Company has definitively established its credibility in the American market by deliberately distinguishing itself from other local and foreign brands in the country (David 2001, p. 14). Wang (2007) asserts that by accomplishing this, Chery Company has provided American consumers with a variety of purchase possibilities. This will provide them the ability to extend confidence in their products while simultaneously allowing them to expand into previously untapped markets (Adidas Group Annual Report 2012).

In addition, the Chery Company, according to Shirouzu (2007, p. 40), swiftly followed the path traveled by most Korean and Japanese models in creating jobs in the United States in order to dispel the widespread misconception that Chinese automobiles pose a threat to the viability of American employment. This was demonstrated by the exceptional role played by Toyota, which employed roughly 40,000 Americans directly in their American outposts. Toyota invested $16.8 billion in facilities and equipment in North America as part of this initiative (Statistical Yearbook: China's Vehicle Production Tops 5 Million for the First Time in 2004 2004). Hyundai America Technical Centre, which currently operates in Michigan Superior Township, exhibited the similar pattern; it has made substantial investments in the region (Jim 2006, p. 34).

The fourth concept that Chery Company has not only ignored but also drastically diminished is the Chinese political philosophy of communism (Shirouzu 2007, p. 39). According to Shirouzu (2007, p. 39), this concept has always carried a strong negative connotation in American public opinion, in part because the American mind-set is formed from a humble beginning that communism has been an evil force to reckon with since the 20th century — an ideology that pitted the United States against the Union of Soviet Socialist Republic.

Rare strengths of Chery Company in the American market

The success of the Chery Company in the American and other markets can be linked to its exceptional qualities, particularly its ability to anticipate issues far in advance (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176). According to Zhang and Ziajing (2013, p. 179), Chery utilizes Tecnomatix software that aids in the variation and analysis of their engineering and product facilitation. This improves the company's capacity to address manufacturing issues before to the product's debut on the American market. Moreover, dimensional engineering has been a strategic endeavor that provides quality management and a platform for collaboration among engineers (Ananthram & Alan 2013, p. 300).

The marketing mix of Chery

For a corporation to properly promote its products, it must meet a number of crucial considerations (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176). Nonetheless, Chery, a Chinese automobile manufacturer planning to join the American market, must recognize that market demands are changing. Consequently, the dynamic market demands necessitate a constant reevaluation of numerous marketing techniques and concepts. These marketing factors include product, price, location, advertising, packaging, positioning, and people (Humphreys & Grayson 2008, p. 132).

Product

As an entrance strategy, many businesses decide what to offer the public, and then they adapt to the needs of their clients (China Auto News, Auto Brands to Watch in the Chinese Market in 2014 2014). Similarly, Chery automakers must recognize that, unlike other consumers, American purchasers have atypical purchasing habits. For instance, Zhang and Ziajing (2013, p. 179) report that Americans are knowledgeable and fashionable automotive buyers. Chery is recognized with manufacturing a variety of products, including Chery, Karry, Rely, and Riich. Moreover, given the number of automakers that have entered the US market, American consumers are in a position to expect high quality from auto suppliers (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176). Hongmei, Work, and Sill (2007) note that for a successful execution of the company's entrance strategy in the United States, the company must conduct thorough research and understand its target market before launching the product.

Price

Regardless matter how much it costs to manufacture their products, Chery Automobile must ensure that their prices reflect what their customers are willing to pay. Chery J1 is available for $9,990; Chery J3 is available for $13,990; and Chery J11 SUV is available for $16,990. In order to avoid making unwarranted assumptions, the Chery vehicle company must ensure that their products are competitive on the American market in order to enter that market (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176).

Place

The Chinese company is located in Asia, a considerable distance from its target market; consequently, the Chery vehicle company must examine how to distribute their products to the US market. To successfully enter the American market, the company must ensure that its automobiles are available at all appropriate times and locations (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176). Selecting a suitable location for the products is required for effective marketing strategies. In addition, the company should regularly update its website with new products and develop a website tailored to the American market.

Promotion

Promotion is how a company informs its target audience about its products and services. According to Zhang and Ziajing (2013, p. 179) it is the most dynamic facet of marketing. In order for Chery, a Chinese automaker, to gain a new market in a foreign country, it must embrace a campaign that is not unidirectional but rather opens the door for interaction with its targeted clients (David 2001, p. 15). To ensure efficient promotions, the company can utilize a variety of advertising techniques, including social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube, among others (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 176).

Packaging

According to Zhang and Ziajing (2013, p. 179) packaging is how a corporation shows its products. For automotive manufacturers, safety is an integral component of their product package. Regarding entering into the American market, Chery must be aware that the United States and Europe have stringent safety and pollution regulations that must be incorporated into their production. Therefore, in order to adhere to standards, the company may source necessary components from foreign enterprises. Other services will need to be outsourced in order to meet United States norms. In addition, partnerships provide the resources and experience necessary to enhance the overall product quality (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 179).

People

While it is true that Americans require more Chinese automakers to enter their market, Chery must examine the changing purchasing habits of current American consumers (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 179). In essence, consumers in the United States expect cars to have extended life spans, regardless of the fact that a minority of consumers trade in their vehicles to conform to current trends and styles. In addition, American buyers, who are ecologically conscious and whose government imposes rigorous safety and pollution requirements, anticipate high gas mileage from tiny automobiles (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 179). Moreover, in their pursuit of success on the vast American market, Chinese automakers inevitably face a number of communication difficulties. Westerners' unfavourable impressions of China and Chinese companies present the greatest obstacle for Chery vehicle (Zhang & Ziajing 2013, p. 179).

Positioning

Chery Motors must comprehend the dynamics and operations of the American market to establish an international reputation. Since it has concentrated the majority of its business in China, the US market is comprised of individuals from various backgrounds. Therefore, the corporation must present itself as a dynamic motor manufacturer in order to provide consumers with automobile brands that meet their needs.

Conclusion

Chery motors has battled to keep its American rivals at away, particularly after witnessing the benefits of strategic cooperation with Chinese automakers. These scales can make prospective buyers more aware of the availability of a certain product or service, as well as the benefits that it provides. Therefore, it is proposed that Chery must address these issues to operate best on the competitive American market. More than anything else, Chery must coordinate with its American shops to boost product marketing and advertising. To build effective advertising campaigns, it is essential to have a mentality of cooperation and interdependence. Additionally, the business must grasp the skill of executing promotion in an approachable and stylish manner.

References

2012 Adidas Group Annual Report Online.

Alon, I., M. Fetscherin, and M. Sardy (2008), "Geely Motors: A Chinese Automobile Manufacturer Enters International Markets," Chinese Culture and Management, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 489-498. Web.

An exploratory qualitative study of North American and Indian managers. Web.

Automobiles 2014. Web.

Case Study of Chery Automobile (2014) Web.

Chery China 2014 Internet.

Auto Brands to Watch on the Chinese Market in 2014, China Auto News, 2014. Web.

Daimler Chrysler was given permission to begin vehicle lending in China in 2005. Web.

Principle and practice of marketing, McGraw Hill, Berkshire, 2001. Web.

Davids, S. C., and Susan W. D., 2004, Transportation energy data book (24th edition), United States Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Web.

Hongmei, G., Work, K., and Sill, B. (2007). Chinese Automobile Manufacturers Eye the American Market. Web.

Humphreys, A., and K. Grayson. 2008. "Kellogg School of Management: The Intersecting Roles of Consumer and Producer: A Critical Perspective on Co-production, Co-creation, and Prosumption." Sociology Compass, vol. 2, no. 10, pp. 134-151. Web.

The international business environment, published by Macmillan and Bath Palgrave in 2002.

Web.

Jim, S. (2006). Five obstacles China must overcome to continue economic growth. Joint Economic Committee of the United States Congress.

Web.

Kerin, B., and Rudellius, H. (2000). Marketing (5th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill, Von Hoffmann Press.

Web.

Mitchell, T., and A. Chilkoti. 2014. China's automobile sales in 2013 outpace those of the United States and Brazil. Web.

Qingfen, D., 2011. Chery Auto to construct a $200 million facility in South America. Web.

Ramo, J. C 2006, 'An image emergency, Newsweek', vol. 148. no. 13, pp. 38-43. Web.

Wall Street Journal, vol. 3, no. 1, pp. 39-40, Shirouzu, N. (2007). "Obscure Chinese car manufacturer seeks U.S. presence: Changfeng's vehicles to be displayed at Detroit show; Communists praise competition." Web.

Sholnn, F 2007, Made in China, Operated in the United States. Web.

Skinner, J., "McDonald's Global Sustainability Scorecard 2011" (Skinner, 2011).

China's vehicle production surpassed 5 million for the first time in 2004. 2004. Web.

Wang, J. 2007, Brand perception is the determining factor for Chinese companies. Web.

Zhang, J., and D. Ziajing, "Marketing strategies for Chery automobile corporation," in Canadian Social Science, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 177-183, 2013. Web.

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A Notebook Computer In Huawei’s Product Portfolio College Admission Essay Help

Executive Synopsis

The primary objectives of this study are to evaluate the state of the market for a notebook computer as a new product and to develop a strategy for incorporating a notebook computer into Huawei's existing product line. The research begins by analyzing the present notebook market and its major competitors. It then focuses on designing a strategy for Huawei to enter the notebook market and implement those methods to achieve a competitive advantage. The research then analyzes the quality flaws in Huawei's notebook as well as other quality factors. Additionally, it investigates a variety of location selection-related factors. Process selection and analysis are additional facets of the investigation. The guideline for selecting suppliers based on a mathematical solution is displayed. The study concludes with a comprehensive plan for implementing the projects.

Introduction

Huawei is a global firm headquartered in China that conducts the majority of its business in the telecommunications industry in the Chinese city of Bantian. The company's aim is to enrich life through communication, backed by missions to supply clients with high-quality products and customer base operations. Huawei's product portfolio contains a variety of network components, including mobile networks, optical networks, etc. Despite being fresh to the notebook market, the company currently intends to enter it.

Situation and industry evaluation

Ruiterbos (3) noted that China was unknown to the rest of the world 10 to twenty years ago, whereas it is now one of the largest economies in the world. China's primary economic foundation consists of its natural riches and its huge human resources, which include more than a billion people. Almost every manufacturer of notebook computers has a facility in China, as notebooks are one of China's most popular goods. Huwai is one of the world's largest makers of mobile network gear. This section of the report examines the current market trends for notebook computers and the major market rivals. In addition, the microenvironment of China is considered for the establishment of this product (Bhattacharyya, 3).

Current Notebook Development:

The major notebook computer manufacturers in China are as follows:

HP: HP currently manufactures a variety of laptop PCs for various user categories. The HP notebook manufacturing facilities are located in China. They are a significant market participant in this region. ACER: Acer also manufactures notebook PCs in China at an affordable price. They are also well-liked in the notebook sector and have attracted many customers. MITSUBISHI: Originally a Taiwanese vehicle manufacturer, Mitsubishi today produces notebook computers and competes on the Chinese market. Philips primarily manufactures televisions for consumers and has a solid reputation in the industry. Currently, they manufacture laptops in China and compete on the market.

In addition to these firms, others like as Dell, Toshiba, Lenovo, Fujishu, etc. also compete in the market (marketing plan- Gigabyte).

Market Share

On the global market, HP holds the most market share, followed by Dell in second place. On the other hand, Acer holds the second position on the Chinese market. Consideration must be given to the fact that regardless of the country of origin, enterprises face worldwide competition (Cuizon, 5).

Implementation method

Huawei's target markets consist of two sorts of clients, and its notebook computers will be designed with these two market segments in mind (Co, 1).

Corporate users consist of those who acquire a laptop for official purposes and do so in bulk.

End user: End users are the typical purchasers of the notebook computer who purchase a single unit for their own purposes. These customers are essential to Huawei since they represent the company's primary customer base (Docstoc.com, 1).

Mission

The Huawei Notebook's objective is to produce a high-quality product at a competitive price and to contribute to the expansion of the Chinese economy.

Objectives

Offer the highest standard of notebooks in the market. Maintain a competitive pricing structure for their portable computer. Enter into distinct market segments. Increase the company's market share. Take the market leadership position within two to three years. Expand the market internationally.

Plans for achieving the objectives

Cost: According to Xiaojie (2006), the competition among notebook computers is primarily based on price, since market competitors introduce low-cost notebooks to acquire greater market share. Quality is a precondition for establishing a brand on the market, and even price-sensitive market segments are aware of the quality. Time is an important factor in the supply chain, as the timely delivery of products is essential for the market's entry and survival. The market for notebook computers and information and technology is more diverse than any other industry. Due to frequent market change, adaptability is of paramount importance (Scribd, 1). Huawei must create the brand on the market and maintain reliability through after-sales services and other promotional strategies (Subramanian, 5). To extend the market, Huawei's R&D department must be able to produce a novel notebook computer design. In this sense, creativity is of the utmost importance, as more novel products increase the likelihood of success (Huawei, 2).

When designing a plan, Huawei should examine the concerns listed above.

Product/service quality design and manufacturing method

When Huawei produces their product design, they must consider a number of product design-related factors (Stevenson, 1). They are listed below:

The notebook computer is a new product on the market, particularly in developing nations, and is unquestionably in its growing phase (Spencer, 2).

To build the notebook, Huawei must consider not only its strengths and resources in product design, but also in assembly design. It is appropriate for the corporation to outsource the semiconductor and develop its own assembly strategy. Remanufacturing: This design involves updating a product's features or components without altering the system as a whole. This design should interact with Huawei's manufacturing facility, as notebooks are nearly updated every month. For the prevention of environmental influences, Huawei's product designs and processes must be created in such a way that the response to the change in the environment is prompt and dependable. Huawei must integrate its production teams in the product design so that these individuals may develop the production process concurrently with the product design. CAD: Computer-Aided Design is required for current production plans, so Huwai must create a graphical design for their plant, allowing for easy modification in the event of an emergency.

Huawei's notebook's competitiveness

The primary market factor and determinant of whether Huawei can conduct business in the Chinese market is competitiveness. Huawei must take into account Price, Quality, Time, and Competitiveness Index in order to remain competitive in the market for notebook computers.

Huawei also analyzes two fundamental aspects of competitiveness: what customers expect from the company and how these values are delivered. These value associations are reflected in the subsequent index.

Using the aforementioned index, Huawei can weight the various components of the value index and must establish a baseline for each factor, such as quality, speed, and flexibility.

Considerations in Location Planning

When selecting a location for their new notebook computer manufacturing factory, Huawei must consider this factor. Stevenson (2005) supports this conclusion.

Regional Factors Regional factors are dependent on the location of raw materials, the location of the market, and the availability of labor force. Huawei should take these considerations into account when picking locations. Community Elements: Among the community factors relating to the location's amenities are the existence of schools, colleges, retail centers, etc. The size of the city, the community's attitude toward the enterprise, tax rates, environmental restrictions, and the availability of utility services are key factors. Huawei must take these things into account when picking the location. Huawei first considers the quality of land, which includes the site's soil, architectural evaluation, development costs, etc., and the cost of transportation, which includes port or shipment facilities, the physical state of the road, the availability of transport, etc.

Location Selection

The alternative location's fixed and variable expenses

Solution

In cost analysis, the total cost is calculated as follows:

Total Cost = Fixed Cost plus Variable Cost multiplied by Output Quantity:

Total cost line plotted against number of output:

Cost-volume-Profit: This graph indicates that Shanghai is the optimal location for producing 5,000 units, whereas Tianjin is the optimal position for producing 8,000 units, and Shanghai is the optimal location for producing more than 11,000 units. Taiwan, on the other hand, does not compensate for its higher fixed costs with a lower output level.

Factor Weighting

It is a weighted strategy for determining the best alternatives based on a number of important parameters and their respective weights. Finally, after accumulating all the weight, examine the choices and select the one with the highest total weight for the plant. Huawei can select its location using this way.

Factor evaluation model

Through this study, Huawei is able to estimate the optimal choices by weighing many elements, and it enables Huawei to evaluate the transportation cost based on its relative advantages or disadvantages.

Research and development for the design of the new product production system comprises:

Method Selection

Process selection entails a number of strategic decisions on the production or acquisition of new product components or the entire product (Klein, 3). Huawei is a telecommunications corporation that uses this method to determine whether to outsource or manufacture the notebook's component. Here is a hypothetical calculation for a purchase decision. –

The expected costs for Huawei's Notebook Plant are as follows:

Total Cost = Fixed cost + Volume X Variable cost per unit So, Make= $900000 + 72000 X $360 = $26820000 Buy = 0 + 72000 X $480 = $34560000

Huawei concludes from the computation that manufacturing is more profitable than purchasing the products.

Strategic Planning

Capacity refers to the increased output capability of a facility or plant. Huawei desires to enter the notebook market, and while the product is in its growth phase, the company must focus on its production capacity. Capacity planning involves determining what kind of capacity is required, how much is required, and when. The capacity of the Huawei notebook plant can be measured using a variety of measurement instruments. There are two different forms of capacity: design capacity and effective capacity. (TeamQuest, Business, 2)

Two disciplines can be used to measure capacity: efficiency and utilization.

Consider that the Design Capacity for Huawei Notebook Plant is 100 laptops per day.

The daily effective capacity is eighty notebooks.

Actual daily output is 72 notebooks.

Consequently, the daily capacity will be:

Work Design

It specifies the aspects of the task or job and the manner in which the work is to be performed. It is essential for achieving efficiency on the workplace and enhancing work output. Huawei must meticulously plan the job for maximum efficiency and output. It is essential to determine the time requirements for completing a certain task. Stopwatch time analysis is a popular method for evaluating the average amount of time necessary to complete a certain task.

Quality Control Program

Quality relates to the consumer's perception of the product, or the ability of the product to meet the unique needs of the client. To achieve success in the notebook industry, Huawei must prioritize some aspect of product quality. These are listed below:

Performance: It refers to the fundamental attributes of the product that buyers often purchase it for (Umamaheswaran, 2). It refers to the appearance of the notebook computer, including its color, size, etc. It refers to special features, such as a webcam, Bluetooth device, Wi-Max modem, etc. Conformity refers to the fulfillment of consumer expectations by the product. Safety is essential for a notebook computer, as it is an electrical device. The reliability of the notebook is its consistent performance. Durability refers to the longevity of the notebook. The warranty guarantees the notebook's minimum lifespan. Perceived quality refers to the judgment of quality by the buyer prior to the actual purchase. It is primarily related to the company's reputation.

Quality control technique

Mean Chart also refers to an x-bar chart that evaluates if the product's quality is inside or outside the acceptable range. A mean chart example clarifies the topic.

The notebook chip processing time was measured using five samples and four observations by the notebook plant's quality inspector (Wiley.com, 1). Inspectors calculated the mean of each sample before calculating the overall mean. All data are in minutes. In the future, he employs three-sigma control limitations. The fact that the standard deviation of the procedure is high indicates inexperience. 02 minutes.

Sample

Using z = 3, n = 3, and =.02, the Upper Control limit and Lower Control limit are as follows:

Here:

= Standard deviation of the sample mean distribution.

= Process variance standard n = Sample size z = Standard normal deviation = Mean of the sample means

Huawei must preserve quality by restricting mistake to the ULC to LCL range.

Supply Chain Administration

According to Wailgum (1), Supply Chain Management encompasses all firm activities, from gathering raw materials for manufacture to delivering the finished product to the client. It is crucial for Huawei, as the notebook market relies heavily on efficient supplier management. Huawei must take into account the following factors while selecting suppliers.

Huawei selects suppliers who give a fair lead time for supplying items, on-time delivery, and documentation of quality issues (Kotler, 214). Quality and quality assurance: Huawei should consider the quality system of the suppliers that is what kind of quality control tools are used by the suppliers and documentation regarding the quality and quality problem and regular investigation of quality. Flexibility: The flexibility of the suppliers is very important as the capacity of the

Boeing 737 MAX Aircraft Crisis Analysis College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Leadership for Delayed Reaction Designs Strategic Actions Conclusion Bibliography

Introduction

Boeing’s response to the Boeing 737 MAX problem was one of the most visible examples of inadequate crisis management due to the absence of rapid steps and attempts at communication from the leadership. This company's recklessness not only resulted in significant financial losses, but also damaged its reputation and validity within the sector. In both situations, Boeing exhibited a degree of hesitation to concede that there was a manufacturing defect with the airplane. It expressed itself in the form of delayed response and blame shifting, which harmed their reputation even further. Therefore, Boeing's response was inadequate because of its tardiness, leadership, and engineers, and despite implementing strategic measures, the overall impact on its reputation and legitimacy was unfavorable.

Delayed Reaction

The Boeing 737 MAX example clearly demonstrates that the corporation was extremely reluctant to respond effectively to the issue. Two plane catastrophes with a total of 346 fatalities were caused by a flawed aircraft design: the crash of Lion Air flight 610 on October 29, 2018, in Indonesia, and the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 on March 9, 2019, in Ethiopia (George and Migdal, 2020, p. 1). In an age of digital information and fast communication, Boeing did not respond immediately to the crashes. For instance, Boeing CEO Denis Muilenburg released his video apology 26 days after the second disaster (Baker, 2019). Nonetheless, he also sought some type of recommendation or counsel from third parties, indicating the gravity of the issue (Tangel, Sider and Pasztor, 2019). In other words, despite requiring time for evaluation, the corporation displayed a response. It is critical to recognize that speed and timeliness are crucial in crisis management. Any organization experiencing a crisis must be able to immediately deliver updates and establish communication channels.

Figure 1: The crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302 (2019)

Moreover, the business resisted grounding its Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. The primary reason is that Boeing did so just five days after the Ethiopian tragedy (RockDove Solutions, 2020). Figure 1 displays the provided events in chronological order. Therefore, not only did the company postpone its communication attempts, but it also did not immediately ground its problematic planes. In other words, the corporation handled the issue effectively, and the majority of its measures were in response to public pressure. The safety of individual passengers did not appear to be Boeing's top priority.

Under contemporary conditions, the most influential factor influencing social transformation is a potent managerial resource embedded in data, information technology, and the organization of communication flows. However, crises can result from disturbances in the production, transmission, and distribution of information. A crisis is an incident that places a corporation in the focus of the media's and other external target audiences' attention, which is not necessarily favorable. The latter group includes stockholders, politicians, trade union organizations, and environmental movements who have a legitimate interest in the organization's conduct. Crisis situations can be prevented, but only with ongoing, methodical effort on the development and application of anti-crisis management methods and technology.

The efficiency of Boeing's anti-crisis strategies is reliant on the recognition of communication as a management activity. Crisis communications is the process of establishing successful contacts between an organization and its public prior to, during, and after negative events in order to retain the organization's solid reputation and limit reputation risks. To do this, Boeing utilized a variety of social communication technologies for anticipating, diagnosing, managing the crisis, adapting to new situations, and mitigating bad outcomes. Public relations is the primary institution whose mission is to maintain communication processes. Public relations as a technique for managing social interactions and public opinion facilitate the passage of information and the construction of successful communication between actors and their target groups. In the case of the Boeing catastrophe, this is of the utmost importance, as not only the accident itself, but also the public's reaction to its occurrence and the organization's reputation must be considered.

Several theoretical methods serve as the foundation for the study of the difficulties of crisis communication management. First, a methodical strategy centered on revealing the integrity of an object and its supporting systems by discovering internal connections and ambient influences. An organization that functions as an open system must sustain constant interaction between its internal structures and exterior objects in accordance with the fundamental principles of systems theory. By adjusting to changes in its internal and external environments, the organization improves its long-term vitality. When considering crisis communications in open Boeing systems as a communication activity, it is essential to emphasize the two-way flow of information and meanings in the communicative space. This includes not only the delivery of vital information messages to the external environment, but also feedback from parts of system monitoring, control, and management.

Evaluation of the responses of various public target audiences is vital because it enables rapid identification of unsuccessful key messages, correction, and adaptation to the present circumstances. In other words, crisis communications include the formation of subject-subject relationships between communicators who view each other as equal owners of particular meanings. Clearly, this engagement at Boeing involves more than merely accepting or rejecting the parameters proposed by the opposing party. It is about mutual influence and taking into account the interests and requirements of the opposing side. All of the aforementioned means constitute the adaptive potential of the organization, which makes it possible to foresee, identify, and assess natural, economic, political, and other hazards, and to design an appropriate communication policy to ensure sustainable development. Therefore, improving the adaptive potential can be viewed as the primary criterion for determining the quality and efficacy of the crisis communications strategy.

Leadership

The majority of decision-making processes are determined by Boeing and other relevant agency leadership. Despite worldwide concerns, it is apparent that the firm is resistant to grounding its aircraft. American Airlines and Southwest Airlines both operated Boeing 737 MAX aircraft until President Trump ordered their grounding (Sucher, 2019). Leaders of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) who defended Boeing’s position and asserted that “review finds no systematic performance flaws and offers no reason to ground the aircraft” exhibited poor management (Sucher, 2019, para. 2). In other words, neither the corporation nor the FAA demonstrated any comprehension of the problem's magnitude (Newburger and Josephs, 2019). Due to the inability to explain the details, the national reputation is at danger if such a response to the problem is implemented.

The matter may have been stopped from escalating if the leaders had been forthright and honest about the planes. It is asserted that the leadership should have framed the issue to demonstrate that various parties, including engineers, certifiers, agencies, and pilots, were at fault (Sucher, 2019). Therefore, the failure of the higher management to take appropriate action is one of the fundamental factors of Boeing's bad crisis management. In modern times, organizations are in a precarious position, regardless of their area of commercial, administrative, or social activity specialization. This necessitates continuous restructuring, adaptation, and creativity. Initially, this is due to external environment elements such as intense rivalry, business globalization, legislative revisions, an inventive approach to technologies, and a shortening in the product life cycle.

Effective utilization of new realities and proper responsiveness to external and internal difficulties have a positive impact on development. However, the same elements, when misread by organizational leadership and not resulting in a prompt response, can be the cause of the disaster (Hall and Goelz, 2019). To thrive, businesses must produce the greatest quality goods and services, maintain high levels of market mobility, and reduce prices. As is the case with Boeing, using merely one or two of these crucial ingredients typically does not produce the desired output. It is also advisable to account for changes in the value system and interests of contemporary workers, who require greater engagement in the organization's operations, greater flexibility, and greater autonomy. They desire to utilize both their expertise and their voice at work. In these circumstances, the acts of the leader are in the foreground, and the leader's responsibility is to influence others to do the prescribed tasks.

The modern leader must be the focal point of the organization and encourage employees to achieve a unified objective. The leader must learn when to listen, when to act, and when to stop in order to work effectively with each individual, as well as with other professionals and group leaders. Effective leadership in the current world is based on a new sort of leader-follower connection. In this instance, followers who realize the leader's value and significance for the cohesive activities of the group transfer power to him or her. Thus, followers actively participate in the group's existence. However, the company's management failed to manage the situation with cohesion and initiative. Additionally, the leader must possess the ability to anticipate. He or she must be adaptable, possess strong communication skills, and earn the group's trust. This expedites goal attainment and secures the involvement of followers in the administration of this process.

Engineers

The Boeing 737 MAX airplane engineers are partially responsible for the malfunctioning technological components of the control system. The company’s response to the crisis with regard to its engineering expertise was one of the few correct decisions made throughout the entire process, as depicted in Figure 2. Boeing revealed that airplane engineers will henceforth report directly to chief engineers, and that middle individual aircraft managers will no longer serve as insulators for smaller teams (Bogaisky, 2019). In other words, engineers at the corporation now have a flatter organizational structure than in the past. In the past, an engineer with a problem was obligated to report to the aircraft managers, who were then responsible for relaying the information to the chief engineer. Because a manager's incentives can be aligned with project completion, such a framework is susceptible to some type of safety failure.

Figure 2. Shifting blame to the pilots (2019)

In addition, the Boeing 737 MAX case highlights the significance of technical ethics in the business. Boeing's defective control software system was in part the result of a lack of clarity on the quality of the installed programs (Herkert, Borenstein, and Miller, 2020). In addition, engineers had no voice, which is essential in huge organizational contexts (Herkert, Borenstein, and Miller, 2020). These ethical considerations are associated with Boeing's engineering methods. It may be more vital to promote software design transparency in order to analyze their security and usefulness accurately.

Strategic Measures

Boeing took a precise course of action to rectify the defective aircraft and reclaim a chunk of its reputation despite the strong criticism. According to estimates, the entire situation cost the firm around $18.7 billion, including legal bills, compensation for the families, and the cost of reconstructing the aircraft (Isidore, 2020). Therefore, the total financial loss had a significant impact on Boeing's market power. However, it is vital to highlight that the COVID-19 pandemic, which further cuts demand for industry products, impedes Boeing's overall business recovery (Welch, 2020). Therefore, the first action taken by the corporation was to increase the voice of its engineering workers. The primary error of the most recent airline owners and managers, such as Boeing, is disregarding the specifics of work and staff in the civil aviation business. In addition, workers are frequently regarded as inanimate objects.

Boeing has implemented fair labor standards for engineers, including compliance with labor laws and, in terms of social partnership, the industry tariff agreement's norms. In addition, the company's restructure will avoid unfair competition, including the linking of administrative resources to eliminate rivals. Due to the disparity between payments and real returns, excessive exploitation of a highly skilled specialist for a little compensation increase over a number of years permits a business to cut its costs.

This is decided by the cost of training, which was paid for by the state, the employee, and other businesses in the industry. After no more than five years of such work, the so-called burnout syndrome and extra handicap render an expert who has not yet reached retirement age unfit for future professional action (Rosenbloom, Malka, and Israel, 2016). This information enables individuals to develop judgments about the industry's management quality crisis at both the firm and industry levels. In the midst of the global economic crisis, Boeing is now taking the required measures to improve the existing position.

Conclusion

In conclusion, one should be aware that the Boeing 737 MAX instance exemplifies inadequate crisis management due to delayed response, weak leadership, and isolated engineers. Despite the fact that the issue seriously harmed the company's brand and credibility, it took a number of smart initiatives to initiate the corporate recovery process. Due to the coronavirus epidemic, however, this endeavor will be considerably more difficult.

Bibliography

Baker, S. (2019) According to Business Insider, Boeing's response to the 737 Max issue confused and frightened the public, making it difficult to accept its apologies (May). Web.

Bogaisky, J. (2019). "Boeing to increase the authority of its engineers in response to the 737 MAX crisis," Forbes, Web.

Attributing guilt to the pilots (2019) Web.

Web. 2019: Ethiopian Airlines flight ET302 crashes.

What went wrong with Boeing's 737 Max?, by W. W. George and A. Migdal, Harvard Business School, Web.

Hall, J. and Goelz, P. (2019) The Boeing 737 Max disaster is a failure of leadership, according to The New York Times website.

Herkert, J., J. Borenstein, and K. Miller. "The Boeing 737 MAX: lessons for engineering ethics." Science and Engineering Ethics, volume 1, pages 1-18, 2020.

Isidore, C. (2020). The cost of the Boeing 737 Max crisis: $18.7 billion and rising. National Geographic.

What You Need to Know About Boeing's 737 Max Crisis, CNBC, Web, 2019.

RockDove Services (2020) Boeing's reiteration of the number one rule in crisis management Web in Case of Emergency.

Rosenbloom, T., Y. Malka, and S. Israel. (2016). "Job burnout of aviation company security guards." Personnel Review, 45(3), pp. 557-558.

Sucher, S. J. (2019). How Boeing should have addressed the 737 Max safety disaster. Harvard Business Review.

Tangel, A., Sider, A. and Pasztor, A. (2019) Boeing's CEO tries to handle the 737 MAX crisis, as reported by The Wall Street Journal online.

Welch, J. (2020) 'Will Boeing soar again? Navigating a corporate recovery process’, Journal of Business Strategy, pp. 1-9.

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Seniors At Home Food Service Organization’s Plans College Admission Essay Help

Seniors at Home Food Service is a fictitious organization concerned with the well-being of seniors in the community. Its strategy aim is to eliminate elderly hunger by 2016 at the latest. The organization is committed to eradicating senior hunger by 2016, and to that end, it has set a number of management plans to ensure that its strategic strategy is carried out within the allotted time frame.

The formation of the group exemplified concern for the care of the elderly more than any other action (Seniors At Home Food Service). This might be interpreted as evidence of the organization's dedication to assisting the elderly. One of the alternative courses of action is to partner with other like-minded organizations to ensure that there are many players involved in the welfare of the elderly, not just seniors at Home Food Service. This is a good solution since it would ensure that more resources and individuals are dedicated to combating hunger among senior citizens.

The third option is to utilize social media such as Facebook and Twitter to increase awareness of the group and its campaign. This would result in the group raising more finances to efficiently achieve its goals. This option is vital since there are many charitable people in the world, but they lack the infrastructure to assist others in need. If correctly followed, these two potential courses of action would assure that the business accomplishes its strategic strategy by 2016.

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Corporate Social Responsibility And Its Historical Background College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction What is social responsibility in the workplace? Background history of corporate social responsibility Conclusion Bibliography

Introduction

This paper defines corporate social responsibility in depth and provides its historical context. Corporate social responsibility is a crucial part that all businesses, whether small, medium, or large, must do. Taking into consideration an organization as a system, corporate social responsibility provides a means for the organization to interact with its surroundings. This includes the organization's consumers, suppliers, potential employees, investors, competitors, non-competing groups, and external stakeholders. The first section of this research focuses on corporate social responsibility in order to have a thorough understanding of the idea. The second section of this study investigates the historical context of corporate social responsibility in order to determine when and how the notion emerged and its significance to the firm and other relevant stakeholders.

What is social responsibility in the workplace?

Corporate social responsibility enables businesses to define and fulfill their obligations in the community by adhering to the social and ethical standards outlined in their guiding principles (Lindgreen & Swaen, 2010). In addition, it gives organizations the opportunity to interact with society in order to assist and elevate the social status of the people. Some organizations specify their code of conduct and the social responsibility they intend to deliver.

Sweeney and Coughlan contend that corporate social responsibility serves as a communication channel between the organization, the consumers, and other stakeholders. This is accomplished through the organization's annual reports and webpages (Lindgreen & Swaen, 2010). Annual reports are disseminated to the public through the media, and they are freely accessible on the company's websites.

Corporate social responsibility is often characterized as the measures corporations take respecting their employees, neighboring communities, and the surrounding environment. The management determines the amount of their participation in such actions, which may extend beyond the firm's basic tasks (Barnea & Rubin, 2010). Even though their primary mission is not in neighborhood social work, a manufacturing company, for instance, may participate in feeding programs for the hungry in the community. The company's actions are consistent with the social values. This is evident on the organization's websites, brochures, newsletters, consultancies, and professional associations. The majority of an organization's income is allocated to CSR efforts. Responsibility Pays and businesses devote more resources to social programs than to any other aspect of business (Barnea & Rubin, 2010).

Background history of corporate social responsibility

Different researchers have characterized corporate social responsibility differently throughout the previous decades. CSR has evolved in terms of its meaning and influence on the conduct of corporations. This research consequently examines the development of CSR and its effects on organizations. CSR has progressed in two areas throughout the past century (Lindgreen & Swaen, 2008). According to the claims of the academics, the discussion of CSR has shifted from ethics-based arguments and the societal benefits of CSR to a movement centered on the firm's performance (Robert & Rosamaria, 2011). Clearly, corporate social responsibility (CSR) in any corporation is intended to improve the firm's success.

In the 1950s and 1960s, it was believed that the social obligation of businesspeople was to uphold the society's fundamental principles. Managers should be concerned with their social duties because their business operations are determined by societal norms and culture. The company aims and objectives should be geared toward accomplishing the public good and fostering a strong, stable, and peaceful society (Rosamaria, 2011). Managers of an organization should accept their social responsibilities and not be constrained by the economic and legal obligations placed upon them.

In the 1970s and 1980s, social responsibility discussions shifted. Milton Friedman argues that social functions are permissible within an enterprise, but they should be ones that add value to the firm. He acknowledged that the laws and regulations regulating the commercial market should be flexible in order to permit corporations to engage in social duties that ultimately generate value.

This decade has witnessed a shift from normative theoretical models to a paradigm in which enterprises are permitted to pursue their own self-interests (Robert & Rosamaria, 2011). Ackerman argues in 1973 that a corporation should only engage in CSR initiatives that do not contradict with its own interests.

From the 1990s to the 21st century, there has been widespread support of CSR operations across all sectors, including the public and corporate sectors, community-based and faith-based organizations, and local, regional, national, and international agencies. In addition to enhancing the firm's performance, social obligations have favorable effects on stakeholders and society. The increased usage of the Internet and other information communication technologies has facilitated communication between the company and its external environment.

In 2005, PriceWaterhouseCoopers conducted a survey on the financial consequences of CSR to a company and discovered that more than seventy percent of top management workers throughout the world felt that CSR has a significant impact on corporate profitability. These companies are utilizing CSR efforts to reach consumers and strengthen their relationships with them. It is part of the corporate plan for generating greater revenue (Robert & Rosamaria, 2011).

Today's businesses have accepted the new organizational behavior and culture ideas. These regulations are designed to meet the shareholders' and society's interests. Corporate social responsibility encompasses rules of transparency, provision of sustainability, engagement with the community, and a variety of values and norms.

Researchers have demonstrated that huge firms practice corporate social responsibility. However, little study has been conducted on small and medium-sized businesses on the assumption that their market reach is local and limited. There is a need to expand the scope of CSR research to include small economies, as the majority of CSR research focuses on large businesses.

Conclusion

Locally and internationally, the majority of businesses engage in corporate social responsibility. It has been demonstrated that socially responsible organizations achieve greater financial performance than those that do not. There has been a shift in corporations' perspectives and implementation of CSR. This is particularly true with major public corporations. The trend in the evolution of corporate social responsibility, according to the researchers, is a shift from its effects on society to its effects on organizational performance, as well as a shift from CSR-theory-based arguments to performance-based studies.

References

Barnea, A. & Rubin, A. (2010). Corporate social responsibility presents shareholders with a conflict. New York City: Springer

Lindgreen, A. & Swaen, V. (2010). The social responsibility of businesses. British Academy of Management, London.

Robert, C. & Rosamaria, C. (2011). Corporate social responsibility's historical background. University of Salamanca is located in Salamanca.

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Dove: The Campaign For Real Beauty College Admission Essay Help

Abstract

Dove was determined to reinvent beauty. The difficulty was that the company was marketing beauty products. Dove embarked on a lengthy journey of controversy that ultimately stimulated public discourse on beauty. Although this is viewed as a naive option, the pros and drawbacks of both sides are rather substantial and warrant consideration before reaching a resolution.

Dove is one of Unilever's main brands, and "in 2007, Unilever's Dove was the world's number-one 'cleansing' brand in the health and beauty industry, with annual sales exceeding $2.5 billion in more than 80 countries. It competed in categories such as cleansing bars, body washes, hand washes, facial care, hair care, deodorants, antiperspirants, and body lotions." The competition consisted of leading brands such as P&G, Kao's, and Beiersdorf.

Over the years, Unilever has become the proud owner and operator of a dozen brands with a combined value of over a billion dollars each. Although Unilever had many accomplishments to be proud of, the company's widespread brand presence was causing worldwide decentralization. In other words, each brand distinguished itself in its individual country, whereas Unilever was not the unifying identity. In 2000, the corporation chose to pursue a "Path of Growth" and establish a strong, coordinated global brand identity.

"A key component of this program was a commitment to reduce the company's more than 1,600 brands to 400. A small number of the surviving brands would be designated as "Masterbrands" and required to serve as umbrella identities for a variety of product types. Previously, Unilever managed brands in a very decentralized manner, letting brand managers in each of the geographic locations where the brand was marketed to determine the brand's future. Now, for the very first time, there would be a global brand unit for each Masterbrand, responsible with defining its global vision and encouraging cooperation from all geographic markets."

Dove, a brand owned by Unilever, established in the United States in the 1950s, following World War II. The basic premise behind Dove soap was that it did not dry out skin like regular soaps, and scientific and military study supported this claim. Through the use of print media, billboards, and television, Dove was able to establish a massive brand identification and equity.

Dove was selected as one of the Masterbrands in line with the concept of centralizing the Unilever identity. In this capacity, it was required to lend its name to Unilever items in personal care categories other than beauty bars, including deodorants, hair care products, facial cleansers, body lotions, and hair styling products. Dove wanted to do something different; they wanted to build an idea and come up with a concept that would define the company's new product extensions. Dove would no longer be a brand of soap. Dove wanted to come up with a new concept that would encompass all of its goods and merge them into a single strategy and "big idea." Rather than offering a single product, it would provide a variety of items.

"No longer could Dove advertise simple functional superiority, as functionality signified different things across categories. Instead, Unilever determined that Dove should advocate for a cause.

The investigation for this new perspective commenced immediately, and an exploratory market study led to the conception of "The Campaign for True Beauty." The assumption that "young, white, blonde, and thin" is the ideal of beauty was the inspiration behind the concept. This concept was portrayed in all commercials and marketing campaigns for beauty goods, despite the fact that it was unattainable for the vast majority of women around the globe.

The initial phase in the introduction of this campaign was a billboard commercial displaying women of various sizes and ethnicities in their bras and panties with the question "outsized or outstanding?" The next move was to develop an advertisement campaign featuring "real" women discussing beauty and posing in plain white underpants.

Dove's U.S. marketing director, Kathy O'Brien, told the press that the business wanted the advertisements to "change how society views beauty" and "provoke discussion and debate about real beauty."

The difficulty emerged when individuals addressed the question, "When you speak of genuine beauty, do you lose the aspect of aspiration? Will consumers be motivated to purchase a brand that does not guarantee a new degree of attractiveness? By exposing the beauty myth, you run the risk of destroying the entire rationale for spending a bit more on the product. You're positioning yourself to become an average brand." In fact, Dove began as a beauty salon!

Next, Dove tackled the self-esteem difficulties of young women, filming their own daughters to illustrate the point. This advertisement was one of the most influential and controversial during the campaign, but, once again, there was a problem: no product was mentioned. Advertisements are meant to promote things and increase revenue, but how could the corporation sell the product if it was absent from the commercial? Tillemans summed up the dilemma: "There was a brand in the health-and-beauty market that brazenly sought to dispel the notion that supermodel beauty was attainable. We claimed that the beauty industry portrayed an unrealistic and clichéd image of beauty, yet there we were, working in the beauty industry ourselves.

The next step was to create a short film and upload it on YouTube in order to further stimulate people's perceptions of beauty. Later, the company developed promotional contests in which ordinary people were asked to give their thoughts on the product and how it made them feel. Eventually, the ad received so much media attention that Katie Couric and Oprah Winfrey developed entire programmes around the concept. However, with good publicity comes bad publicity, and the question in this case was whether "even bad publicity is good publicity" would be true for Dove. In response to the objections, Dove elected to spread and stir up even more controversy, resulting in a great deal of notoriety. Dove was also on top of its public relations strategies and organized camps to assist young ladies with concerns of self-esteem and confidence.

There may have been potential resolutions to the problem. The simplest and most straightforward is that they may have adhered to ordinary conventions and capitalized on someone else's conception of beauty. By battling for "The Campaign for Real Beauty," Dove was competing against itself: a beautiful brand attempting to redefine the term "beauty." This technique would have resulted in Dove being comparable to every other beauty brand on the market. It would compete with the same individuals in the same manner. There may have been fewer dangers. Dove possessed a solid brand identity and was widely recognized. The company might have utilized the same concept as its beauty bar, "a product that does not dry the skin." They may have expanded their product line by producing a hairspray composition that would leave hair softer, less dry, and less brittle than competing hairsprays. The deodorant may have included a moisturizer for the underarm, a region that many people forget after addressing odor and perspiration control. The lotions, cleansers, and all other products might have been built on a recipe that was creamier and more hydrating, and this could have been the company's brand concept from the start. They might have avoided all dangers by adhering to tradition and, with the help of market research, could have determined if moisturizing items would be successful on the present market.

However, this technique would have had significant drawbacks. The products would be promoted based solely on their functionality, without any notion or idea. It would make the product purely utilitarian. If you take any product on the market today it has a brand identity, a brand image and basically a story to tell. Experiential marketing is the new norm, and when ideas are presented in a narrative format, they are more likely to be purchased. We visit Disney in order to have a magical experience, Herbal Essences was sold as an orgasmic experience, and people book a five-star hotel in order to have a pleasant and comfortable stay. The objective of Unilever was to internationally centralize its brands, and the lack of a singular idea other than a practical advantage could have been damaging to the brand's health.

There were dangers associated with the beauty promotion, but a higher risk might often result in a greater return. Dove may have been able to control the media's portrayal of the brand if it had done so when the campaign began to receive negative press. The advantages of press control are evident: you can maintain a positive image for your company or brand and stifle resistance. Although what Dove did was to take an issue and deliberately create controversy around it in order to produce propaganda, it would have been absolutely undemocratic for Dove to have controlled what the opposition had to say. Dove's "Campaign for Real Beauty" aimed to distance itself from the stereotypical and undemocratic notion of "young, white, blonde" beauty. Henceforth stopping any negative feedback would contradict their original idea.

Ironically, their approach violated the foundation of the beauty product market: selling a certain idea of beauty. Call it naiveté or sincerity, but Dove was essentially using its own product to spark societal debate. This may have been regarded as the companies' naiveté in the business world. Dove would have been able to sidestep this difficulty if it had simply concentrated on accepting differences instead of attempting to rethink the entire concept of beauty, which is a hazardous but earnest proposal. Again, a conundrum would emerge. To accept diversity for their own sake is essentially a redefinition of beauty.

What Dove achieved, in my perspective, was groundbreaking. Although it was quite a conundrum, it was something novel, something no one in the beauty product industry had ever done before. It takes courage to abandon the age-old concept that has been the basis of a product's selling strategy and adopt a novel approach. Non-profit groups have long advocated for the appreciation of differences, but when a for-profit corporation takes a stance, it can be heard louder and have a greater influence. Today's society is permeated by the media and the messages it conveys. Media permeates our bodies. We obtain all information from the media, in whatever shape it takes. Sometimes we forget that what the media depicts is not just information and facts. Sometimes, we fail to recognize that the information provided by the media has an ulterior motive and is not value-neutral. Everywhere we look, we are assaulted with images of attractive, toned bodies in order to get lured into the consumer-based industry upon which our country is founded.

Dove provided a fresh perspective to the mainstream media. It explained that true beauty comes from within and not from beauty goods, makeup, a specific body type, or accessories. Dove educated or assisted women all over the world in appreciating differences and boosting their self-esteem and confidence. Although some people believe that Dove competed with its own products, I believe that Dove gave a new perspective on beauty items. It's not to improve our appearance, but to preserve what we currently have. Dove did not destroy all the beauty soaps in the world; instead, it encouraged women to take care of their skin. It taught women that instead of getting caught up in the cosmetic age's maelstrom, they should focus on maintaining their skin, body, and hair healthy.

According to the New York Times Magazine, the campaign was indeed "Social Lubricant—How a marketing campaign became the catalyst for a societal debate; the more intriguing fact is that it was a marketing campaign—not a political figure, major news organization, or film—that "opened a dialogue."

"In September 2006, Landor Associates named Dove as one of the ten brands with the highest percentage increase in brand health and revenue. It was estimated that the brand's value increased by $1.2 billion." It is unclear if the expansion of product categories or "The Campaign for Real Beauty" contributed to this increase, but Dove accomplished a significant objective. The campaign was well-known, and the public and all forms of media covered it extensively. Because of the celebrity exposure the campaign attracted and its provocative premise, a great deal of discussion was generated.

“Thousands of blogs and Internet chat forums showed a rich diversity of public dialog. There were declarations from fathers to girls on topics such as self-esteem, as well as support for Dove's stance against beauty norms. On platforms that allow users to upload and exchange videos, such as YouTube, Google Video, and Grouper, parody advertisements were abundant. Some of the parodies were respectful of the brand or lightly humorous, whilst others were edgier. Some Internet remarks and parodies raised issues about Unilever's sincerity, objectivity, and motivations. Then there were the experienced marketers and advisers attempting to comprehend the strategy of a brand that was constructing significance by courting controversy.

Dove was able to sell more items while reaching its goal of redefining beauty or at least introducing the choice on the menu card. Others may have perceived Dove's decision as naivety, but its sincerity paid off.

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Valero Energy Comprehensive Analysis College Admission Essay Help

Introduction

With the development of technology and the evolution of business tactics, organizations and businesses must continually examine their marketing plans. This is to ensure that they remain on the market and are not surpassed by rivals and other substitute products (Ray, 2007). In order for a business to convert risks into opportunities and weaknesses into strengths, it must design and implement appropriate plans and clearly define the measures it will take to do so. The article covers the external environment and organizational structure of the Valero Company, identifies contemporary potential and obstacles to change, and concludes with recommendations. The report is crucial for future expansion and development because it serves as the foundation for Valero Energy Company's self-evaluation.

Valero Energy

Valero Energy is the largest oil refiner in North America. Valero increased its annual revenue to $90 billion following the recent acquisition of competitor refineries. The rapid rise of Valero has been beneficial for its stockholders, but a nightmare for its information system management professionals. The company refines heavy crude and inexpensive residual oil to produce gallons of diesel. It operates refineries in California, Louisiana, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Aruba, and Canada, with a total production capacity of around 3 million barrels per day. It also operates around 5,800 retail gas stations and wholesale locations in 44 U.S. states and Canada under the names Corner Store, Diamond Shamrock, Shamrock, Ultramar, Valero, Stop N Go, and Beacon (Nohria, 2002, p. 46).

Pestel Analysis

Political: Valero Energy confronts significant political risks in the nations where it operates, although the political climate in the majority of countries is supportive to the company's operations. The political situation in South Korea has become a source of concern for Valero Energy in recent years, as the country confronts political instability. However, the situation is not as dire as in other nations in which the company operates. This is especially true in Africa and Southeast Asia, where unfriendly business environments place Valero Energy at a substantial disadvantage (Mandan, 2005). As stated earlier in this article, the corporation is proud of its original approach to technology and utilization of the same for the release of goods that incorporate cutting-edge technologies in their design and functionality. Valero Energy's technological capabilities are well-known, and the corporation is particularly strong in this area. The company's innovation drive is its greatest asset, and it can take pleasure in being a pioneer for numerous technological advances that it has presented to the global marketplace through its products (Donald, 2005). Economic: Valero Energy employs effective methods in the markets it serves, taking into account the size of the economy and the purchasing power of consumers in terms of characteristics such as disposable income. Given that the corporation requires clients to have high amounts of disposable income in order to purchase its products, it has adopted a marketing strategy focused at the middle classes in the nations in which it operates. In addition, the corporation enters markets where the business cycle for the products it offers is in its infancy, as opposed to industrialized nations where the product lifecycle for its range of products is in its decline or maturity phase. This strategy of entering countries where the items have an established market has paid off (Lancaster, 2009). Environmental: The company has begun to recognize its environmental and social responsibilities, as indicated by its CSR strategy and "green policies." Many of the company's industrial buildings are constructed using ecologically friendly designs, and the corporation is also implementing other environmentally conscious practices (Donald, 2005).

An assessment

Porter's Five Forces Analysis

In the expansion, several considerations must be made. There are internal and external company environments. All recommendations must be made following the PESTLE analysis. The subsequent section examines the many external issues that have impeded Valero Energy's expansion. I study Valero Energy using Porter's Five Forces model in this part. In addition to analyzing the five forces, the impact of stakeholders on the company's business prospects is also considered. Each force is analyzed in depth and presented in relation to the firm's macro and microenvironment (Lancaster, 2009).

As there are numerous providers on the market for raw materials, the suppliers' bargaining strength is rather restricted. There are well over a thousand oil suppliers in South Korea and throughout the world. Valero Energy is reliant on its suppliers for timely oil delivery; hence, any disruption to the supply chain can be problematic. Market Entry has a significant influence since Valero Energy has found it simple to enter areas where it wishes to conduct business. Valero Energy, for instance, has entered China and India, two rising countries that provide the volumes that expanding business requires (Donald, 2005). The relative ease with which Valero Energy has entered these markets is a force that can be utilized for the company's benefit. Due to the growth of protectionist inclinations in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, it may be more difficult for Valero Energy to acquire markets as easily as it has in the past. Existing players' competition is an issue that must be considered while considering whether or not to enter a foreign market. This is something Valero Energy must consider while determining its approach for entering foreign markets (Ray, 2007). Power of Buyers: Indeed, the power of buyers is a variable factor. This is because purchasers have a variety of options and products from which to chose. Taking into account the fact that there are several oil suppliers and products will assist the business in determining its market areas. In addition, some cars and machines are intended to use goods other than diesel, which severely impacts the marketing of Valero's diesel gallonage (Lancaster, 2009). Valero Energy has an edge due to the fact that purchasers cannot immediately transfer suppliers; instead, they take the time to adjust and adapt, switching brands only when they are entirely unsatisfied with the company. This has helped Valero retain its current clientele. This is the erosion of so-called "repeat customers" as they lose confidence in the brand's capacity to deliver the goods (Laforet & Li, 2006). The Danger of Alternatives: Indeed, substitutes pose a significant danger to a corporation like Valero Energy. Given that the consumer durables industry is characterized by severe competition, with competitors often offering items similar to those of Valero Energy, it is not surprising that the company must be on its toes to keep up with the rapid rate at which new companies are entering the market. Given these facts, the competitive threat to Valero Energy is undoubtedly considerable, and this is one of the Five Forces that poses a serious threat to the company (Donald, 2005). Industry Competition: Due to the presence of other competitors, this element's impact is unquestionably significant. Particularly in rising areas such as India, competition is so severe and intense. Stakeholders: Because of the emergence of the environmentally-conscious movement and the push towards CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility), companies such as Valero Energy have become more attentive to the concerns of these organizations in recent years. The fact that shareholders are progressively demanding greater accountability and transparency in the wake of recent scandals is evidence of their rising ability to keep Valero Energy's management accountable and responsible.

Present the expansion plan and an internal study

By acquiring many companies that were themselves the result of multiple acquisitions, Valero was left with dozens of incompatible software systems that needed to connect and share data. Although a conventional option would have been to create or acquire middleware to bridge the gap, Valero opted for a cutting-edge software development strategy known as service-oriented architecture (SOA).

Software experts at Valero initiated the development of software services to offer users with an interface to the company's heterogeneous systems. They designed them for flexible reuse and recombination (Mandan, 2005). Valero hoped that by using a service-oriented architecture, it would be able to integrate its diverse information systems, conduct business more efficiently, and lower operating expenses. Over time, the company has released more over one hundred services built on SAP's Net Weaver Applicant server Development Environment. Many are composite services composed of multiple smaller services. Approximately 22,000 employees and 5,000 clients utilize SOA services provided by Valero (Gregory, 2007). As a result of their SOA strategy, Valero has saved millions of dollars. A technology developed to provide visibility into tanker transportation timetables saved the corporation $500,000 in dock-idle charges. The ability of management to monitor corporate data from across the company in real-time results in further cost reductions.

Valero is developing tools that enable managers to create their own SOA services. If managers can get the information they require without going through the standard system request procedure, the business is streamlined and the information system team is freed up to work on larger initiatives.

When tackling a new service request, rather than coding from scratch, Valero software engineers examine previously built services to identify one that can be reused or refashioned. Valero saves time, effort, and money by organizing and cataloging reusable services. Using Net Weaver platforms, Valero engineers were able to construct 300 services rapidly and easily. Before moving forward with new development, Valero's director of enterprise architecture and technology services, Nayaki Nayyer, reduced the number of services to 50, isolating the finest core services.

Valero L.P transports refined goods from Valero energy Corporation refineries to the Southwest market through pipeline. It also provides feedstock to Valero Energy's main refineries. The company owns a 25-mile hydrogen pipeline system and 3.795 miles of crude oil and refined products pipelines that carry an average of 35550,00 barrels per day (Donald, 2005). The company possesses sixty crude oil and intermediate feedstock storage tanks with a total capacity of roughly 12,500,000 barrels. Valero carries refined products such as gasoline, distillates, natural gas liquids, feedstock, and crude petroleum. Transporting crude oil and processed products through its pipelines incurs fees, as do terminal use fees. All of the Company's crude oil and processed product pipelines are operated in San Antonio and Dumas, Texas, via satellite communication and computer systems (Logan, 2001). In July 2005, the company agreed to sell a terminal and pipeline in the Rocky Mountains with four truck terminals and storage to a subsidiary of Pacific Energy Partners, L.P. for $455 million. Valero acquired Kanab services LLC, Kanab Pipe Line Partners, L.P., and all of Kanab services' equity securities for about $2.7 billion in July. The combined firm will be one of the largest operators of terminals and petroleum liquids pipelines in the Valero Energy States (Ray, 2007).

Employees at Valero have access to educational reimbursement, a fitness center, and a wellness program that offers information and events on nutrition, fitness, family, injury prevention, and stress management. In 2004, Valero employees volunteered for community projects for 200,000 hours and gave $9 million to the Valero Energy Way.

The severely faltering ethanol industry in the United States has its fair share of distressed assets. Valero energy, West LB, Dougherty Funding, and AgStar Financial Services have offered a total of $993 million to acquire all 16 of bankrupt ethanol manufacturer VeraSun Energy's ethanol units (Logan, 2001). Notably, Oil Company Valero energy successfully bid $477 million for seven VeraSun facilities and one potential development site, which is equivalent to $0.61 per gallon of installed capacity. This is inexpensive compared to the about $1/gallon it cost to build a Greenfield plant at the beginning of the ethanol craze in 2006 or the $2/gallon it cost during the height of the boom, and it is painfully obvious how much things have deteriorated (Mandan, 2005).

Valero Energy Change Obstacles

Valero Energy has been impeded by a variety of obstacles. Numerous Oil Companies' robust market bases have impeded its expansion. Valero Energy's operations region has also been constrained by insufficient cash and a deficiency of branches (Mandan, 2005). They operate with a limited number of branches that have not been able to completely cover the market. The current design of the company does not provide for greater expansion. The simplistic form allows for minimal growth, if any. Therefore, it is crucial and essential that Valero Energy Company's design be modified to meet modern requirements. This has been a barrier to change, but it appears to no longer be so. In addition, marketing strategies should be modified. The second obstacle to change is technological progress. Numerous businesses and enhanced performance are the outcome of this phenomenon (Ray, 2007).

In today's businesses, evolution is inevitable. For the firm to achieve success and preserve its competitive advantage, it must be adaptable to change. There are various obstacles to change, including ineffective communication, ineffective leadership, and a lack of readiness to change (employees and employers). Valero Energy's organizational structure hinders efficient communication between employers and employees. The lack of communication skills has operated as a barrier to transformation (Mandan, 2005).

Suggestions and Enhancements

The Valero Energy Company must protect its future in the corporate sector, therefore the development of a future-focused strategy. The formation of this strategy starts with the personnel and product competences. “It is crucial to build a strategic architecture that essentially ensures customer satisfaction in the context of meeting the relevant requirements.” (Gregory, 2007, pp. 22-27).

Particularly among Valero Energy's managers, it is essential to emphasize the characteristics associated with effective strategic management. These qualities require constant education and enlightenment in accordance with the changes that are perceived in the environment; consequently, it is crucial that managers and the Valero Energy company share a bond and exhibit certain types of characteristics; otherwise, "one of the aforementioned will compromise his or her values" (Donner, & Camlio 2008, pp. 39-47). There will be a need for a manager to reflect the same value as an organization.

The strategies that are employed by the Valero Energy group need to be flexible; this is because “the world that we are currently living in is bound to changes either in the macro environment or the micro environment” (Ray, 2007, pp. 24-26). Therefore, Valero Energy's Vision must be expanded to adapt

Organizational Behavior: Stress Factors In Workplace College Admission Essay Help

Table of Contents Introductory Material Work and Non-Work Stressors and Their Effects on Larry The Significance of Money to Larry Larry's Self-Leadership Type of Reward Employed at Larry's Workplace Making Sure the Reward is Effective Stage of Team Development Reference List

Introduction

It is difficult to disagree that people's lives would be considerably more calm and comfortable if they did not face daily stress. Sadly, there is no such sphere that is completely stress-free. Whether at the workplace, with their families, at school, with their friends, or in any other aspect of life, people are frequently anxious due to a number of circumstances. Being under stress is not only detrimental to a person's health, but also to his or her capacity to achieve in other areas. This, in turn, generates greater anxiety, creating a vicious cycle. Leaders must address the emotional state of their employees and provide a distinctive environment and rewards that contribute to their stress reduction in the workplace (Workplace stress – general, 2018). This article will examine Larry's situation, various stressors, view of money, self-leadership, and workplace.

Work and Non-Work Stressors and Their Effects on Larry

According to the case study, Larry's life becomes increasingly difficult. This is due to the different stressors he must deal with at work and at home, which can have either positive or, more likely, negative outcomes (Workplace stress – general, 2018). The first source of stress is Larry's low income, which was usual before he established his own family but became a big issue following the birth of their child. This stressor can either exacerbate Larry's family problems and potentially lead to a divorce, or encourage him to find a better employment. Depending on the salary, a second stressor can have the same beneficial effect as the initial one (Workplace stress – general, 2018). Larry's sense of money would be tainted, and he would be dissatisfied with his abilities and life.

Alfonso Reyes's potential to assume Larry's position is a further source of tension at work. This fact disrupts Larry's neurological system and prevents him from focusing on his job (Workplace stress – general, 2018). Long-term anxiety over this prospect may result in mental problems such as depression or push Larry to improve his qualifications and become a better specialist and leader than Alfonso. Lastly, another factor related to his profession is waking up afraid, not sleeping well, and considering his job to be terrifying. Larry constantly fears that he may be assigned a task he cannot handle. This state of emotional strain can also result in despair or anxiety (Workplace stress – general, 2018). Moreover, this stressor can considerably exacerbate Larry's smoking and drinking habits.

In addition to work-related factors, family issues affect Larry's neurological system. Unfortunately, his child is the primary source of stress at home. Due to the infant, Larry lacks sufficient funds and is unable to spend time with his friends or become distracted by work-related concerns. Seeing his child as a source of worry can result in strained familial connections or even divorce. Overall, the situation in Larry's home is a considerable source of stress, as he receives new issues and arguments in lieu of substantial assistance.

The Significance of Money to Larry

When addressing tensions associated with employment and payment, it is vital to assess the individual's view of money. According to researchers, this aspect can have a considerable impact on one's stress level (The meaning of money, no date). It appears that Larry does not comprehend the true value of the payment. Before he got married, he used to fritter away his pay on entertainment with his buddies without considering what it could be used for. Due to the sudden appearance of Larry's family, he was unable to rebuild his concept of work and income (The meaning of money, no date). Now, he considers a shortage of money and a little increase in salary to be significant reasons for his ongoing work-related stress.

The Self-Leadership of Larry

Self-leadership focuses on regulating and observing oneself, whereas leadership in general focuses on influencing others. Self-leadership requires particular attributes, like self-discipline, knowledge, honesty, and consciousness (Jeffrey, no date). After examining the presented case study, it is unlikely that anyone will realize that Larry has at least one of them. First, he is unaware of his capabilities, strengths, desires, and objectives (Guide to self-leadership, 2020). He does not make an effort to understand himself and simply follows the flow. Larry's lack of self-discipline, which is arguably the most essential attribute for achieving success, is difficult to dispute.

Nonetheless, it would be unjust not to highlight that he accomplished amazing things throughout his lifetime. Larry finished from high school with good grades, landed his first job, and chose to get married, something that not all middle-aged men are prepared to accomplish. Unfortunately, Larry lacks genuine motivation, preventing him from proceeding (Guide to self-leadership, 2020). He does not study, raise his qualifications, enroll in leadership classes, or do anything else to better himself and improve the situation.

As discussed previously, the purpose of leadership is to guide and assist others in achieving success. Self-leadership, on the other hand, is the capacity to eradicate one's deficiencies, bolster one's strengths, specify the major objective, and force oneself to go in that direction without giving up (Guide to self-leadership, 2020). Larry must develop this trait in order to affect situations, avoid stressors, and profit from his experiences by learning a lesson.

Type of Reward Used at Larry's Place of Employment

Larry was given a position as a number three guy on one of his boss's survey crews following his graduation. Then, his employer selected him as the only employee qualified to become the new crew chief. Larry obtained a job and his boss's trust as a result of his perseverance in pursuing first a higher wage and subsequently employment (Davoren, 2019). Consequently, the incentive in Larry's job is the promotion of the top employees.

Ensuring the Effectiveness of the Reward

There are a number of strategies to ensure that the reward system implemented in the workplace is effective and motivates the employees. The most effective technique, in my opinion, is to inform staff that they will only receive awards if everyone works hard to improve the company's overall performance (Davoren, 2019). The most effective method of motivating employees is to present those who have achieved the highest achievements with monetary incentives in the form of paid courses for enhancing their certifications (Davoren, 2019). This is a means for the boss to demonstrate his or her appreciation for the employee and provide him or her with an opportunity for progress.

In addition, there is a second strategy to push people to work harder, which is related to the first. It is difficult to deny that ascending the job ladder is difficult and time-consuming, yet higher positions offer greater perks (Davoren, 2019). Therefore, it would be rather effective to select one or two staff for occasional promotions. It is an ideal method for assisting workers to enhance their revenue and advance their careers (Davoren, 2019). Ultimately, this is a necessary incentive for the entire team to perform at its highest level.

Team Development Phase

There are various stages of team development, and all team members must progress through them in order to become a high-performing, unified unit. It is possible to assess the stage of development when considering Larry's work team and the fact that its members may object to their employer that he has no right to destroy their lungs by smoking. According to the information presented, Larry's team is in the second stage (Five stages of team development, no date). They begin to notice each other's weaknesses and become frustrated by their boss' or coworkers' habits. At this level, researchers remark that employees "may even question the authority or direction of group leaders" (Five stages of team development, no date, para. 13). By making such complaints, Larry's coworkers challenge his authority.

Bibliography

Davoren, J. (2019) What kinds of incentives would inspire employees within an organization? Web.

Five stages of group growth (no date). Web.

Manual for self-leadership (2020). Web.

S. Jeffrey (no date) How to develop self-leadership in order to control your behavior and realize your leadership potential. Web.

The meaning of money (no date). Web.

Workplace stress – general (2018). Web.

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