Port Management And Operations Mba Essay Help

Increasing the rate of cargo processing in a port terminal should be a top priority for all port managers. As a government auditor intent on resolving cargo-handling concerns at a port, I would suggest to the terminal management the adoption of many measures to address the issue within 90 days. The stowage strategy, pre-shipment planning, and onboard stowage are the primary factors to consider (Alderton 123). Pre-shipment planning is essential because it facilitates ship stowage and cargo distribution at terminals. In order to prevent complications connected with last-minute modifications, stowage arrangements must be somewhat adaptable. Additionally, freight handling speed should be increased (123). This can be accomplished by embracing innovation in the logistics and transportation industries to eliminate costly and inefficient container movements within port terminals. To avoid congestion at the port terminal, cargo must arrive at the port on time. To discourage early arrival, a pricing policy and a well-organized calling forward channel with shippers may be necessary.

Once cargo arrives at the port, procedures should be implemented that require the consignee to collect the goods as soon as possible, and failing to do so should result in hefty fines. To reduce cargo delays at the terminal, the port administration should have an efficient system for expediting currency payments and paperwork. The latest technology, which employs a computerized system with efficient software, can contribute significantly to the effective handling of containers at crowded terminals. Alderton argues that ships should not be overloaded because doing so will raise draft, which is essential for the passage of ships into and out of the port (124). Port employees should be equipped with the required devices, calculators, and information to prevent such events, and those who violate relevant rules or policies should be penalised to serve as a deterrent against future occurrences (124).

The development of cargo handling automation is a further method that can readily facilitate container handling at the port terminal. To achieve this, there should be an increase in mechanization and dock-building employing the most advanced equipment available on the market, as this will save both money and time in the port's cargo handling (128). Continuous unloading equipment, such as conveyor spirals or bucket conveyors, can be utilized to release bulk freight in a continuous process (131). According to Alderton, warehousing technology used to manage warehouse operations is highly effective in terms of speed and freight handling (141). Retrieval devices, automatic retrieval and stacking devices, aisle automated movers, cargo locating systems, and deep shelf conveyors are essential warehouse technologies that a terminal manager could deploy to improve warehouse productivity (141).

I would also suggest that the port management investigate the pay and wages of the port's staff. The container terminals should not leave the employment of their employees to impromptu circumstances; rather, they should hire and compensate their personnel directly. If this responsibility is delegated to the agencies, they will hire the necessary personnel on a contractual basis and deny them money and job security, which has a devastating effect on employee morale (Alderton 149). This will have a significant impact on logistics operations, which is one of the factors contributing to the sluggish cargo handling at port terminals. It should be the responsibility of the port management team to hire the port personnel, pay them appropriately, and provide them with job and income security, as this is likely to change the workers' attitudes and contribute to the achievement of the set goals, which in this case is accelerating cargo handling (Evans & Maloney 18). In addition, employees should receive sufficient training so that they may perform optimally, efficiently, and effectively in their area of responsibility, since employee training in the present era is a wise investment and a good idea (Alderton 154).

The port administration must also give careful thought to the issue of working hours. To prevent cargo delays at the ports, it is necessary to reevaluate operating hours. Terminals for containers and bulk cargo should be operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week (Alderton 150). Alderton observes that strikes can have a devastating impact on cargo processing at a terminal, thus it is crucial for port management to adopt the necessary decision-making skills and be proactive to prevent them (160). Cargo handling can be delayed by ship catastrophes such as fire, mechanical failure, collision, and mechanical failure. Therefore, it is vital for the port management to implement laws that ensure all ships landing at the port are in good shape and equipped to withstand specific ship disasters. The weather may interfere in some way with cargo handling. For example, fog and gales can either halt or restrict port activity. Tanker terminals may be halted if gales prohibit the handling of cargo at berths, as gales can prevent the handling of cargo (Alderton 163). Therefore, it is the responsibility of the port manager to guarantee that the weather forecast team is competent enough to provide reliable weather information that will prevent unneeded delays or shutdowns at the port terminals.

Planning of operations at the port is essential for guaranteeing the efficient handling of goods (Evans & Maloney 5). To avoid interfering with the port's traffic flow, planning authorities and the management team of the port should create suitable plans for the expansion of the port in advance. The administration should also be responsible for port administration (Evans & Maloney 18). The port administration should be authorized by law and policy to carry out their duties without external or political influence. Evens and Maloney assert that there is also a requirement for applicable skills and that management should hire qualified workers who should be properly taught before being assigned to their work (6). The port manager should promote harmonious labor relations at the port. Without effective labor relations, little can be accomplished because teamwork is essential for cargo handling (Alderton 165). In addition, the port manager should serve as a link between the port and the outside world by ensuring efficient coordination and cooperation among the port's many government and corporate institutions (165). Alderton acknowledges that a port manager must also consider a number of other factors in order to resolve cargo handling challenges at the port. They include port traffic, operations, maintenance, clearance documents and procedures, location, dynamic effects, and function (166).

Sources Cited

Alderton, Patrick. Port Administration and Operations. Informa publishers, London, in 2008.

Evans, Amada & Maloney, Jade. Transportation and supply chain management. 2008 Australia: Career FAQs

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An Effective Workforce Hiring Process Of Resolute Energy Corporation Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Project Administration and Methodology Various Project Phases Project scope Project Operations Sequence Project Timetable Completion References

Introduction

An efficient hiring procedure is essential for any business. This is due to a company's ability to recruit and retain the best staff with the requisite skills, knowledge, and talent to execute projects. Consequently, Resolute Energy Corporation should establish and implement a new hiring procedure that would allow it to attract an exceptional team. The creation and implementation of the company's new worker recruitment plan will occur in phases. This research proposal describes the steps required in creating a new hiring procedure for the oil company.

Project Administration and Methodology

The Resolute Energy Corporation will develop a team to oversee the project's implementation. The team will be responsible for establishing a new hiring strategy. The plan should meet the company's and its human resource requirements. The team will analyze the present hiring methods in order to find holes that the new plan will fill.

The team will evaluate the existing recruitment and retention practices of Resolute Energy Corporation. The team will concentrate on determining recruitment needs, hiring strategies, and screening techniques. In addition, the team will examine the selection procedures, reference and background checks, and personnel resource acquisition. The team will use the "Change Agents' Guide to Radical Improvement" technique developed by Ken Miller (Miller & Lawton, 2002).

The team will utilize available resources to assess the scope of the proposed project. Human resource personnel are also a vital source of information regarding the current hiring plan. The team will rely on documentation that guide the process of establishing jobs requiring personnel. In addition, the team will do extensive study on hiring practices with the current staff, experts, and management. The team will conduct Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) and interviews to gather more information on how to enhance a hiring plan. Human resource management specialists should be consulted in order to comprehend the hiring procedures (Lewis, 2011).

Various Project Phases

The phases of the workforce hiring project will range from when Resolute Energy Corporation aims to hire a new staff to when the individual is seated at a workstation. The first step of the new hiring procedure will consist of designing the modalities for preparing to hire a new workforce (Lewis, 2011). This entails establishing the need for additional personnel and engaging in conversations with department heads regarding important role requirements. The second phase comprises determining the strategy for developing a position's job description.

The third phase involves defining a criterion for selecting the interview panel. The fourth phase involves determining when Resolute Energy Corporation will hire from inside or externally. The fifth step is determining the screening strategy that qualifies candidates for an interview (Kerzner, 2010). The sixth step will encompass the interviewing procedures. The final phase will concentrate on the documentation techniques that will be utilized by the panel when picking a new workforce.

Project scope

Resolute Energy Corporation must comprehend the extent of a new employment effort due to its repercussions for the organization. The scope of the project is to overhaul the company's recruitment strategy. Future employee recruitment will be outlined in the new employment plan. The ultimate objective is to guarantee that Resolute Energy Corporation develops the most effective and efficient approach for acquiring a workforce with exceptional credentials, skills, expertise, and talent to drive its operations and projects (Kerzner, 2010). Additionally, the team needs various paperwork for implementing the new hiring plan. Additionally, the organization requires financial resources to support the employment process and pay new employees.

Project Activities Sequence

The management of Resolute Energy Corporation will pick individuals to design the new hiring strategy. Identified individuals may comprise both employees and non-employees. The company will also establish the team's terms of reference. Thirdly, the team will begin its work by conducting the preliminary activity of gathering accessible resources in order to gain the information necessary to appreciate the project's scope (Kerzner, 2010). The team will then review the present hiring strategy in order to uncover and document supporting data.

Fifthly, the team will undertake research via FGDs and interviews with members of the workforce, firm management, human resource department workers, and subject matter experts. The sixth step is to record the findings of the research (Lewis, 2011). The next step is to examine the hiring procedures of other organizations and document their best practices. The eighth action requires the team to create a new hiring strategy. The ninth task is to show the document to the company's management in order to receive their feedback. The team will next apply the final hiring plan's recommendations, publish the paper, and discuss it with Resolute Energy Corporation management.

Project Timetable

The new hiring strategy will take ninety days to develop. The labor requirements for the project implementation need the formation of a team to carry out the required tasks. The project demands different resources for its implementation. The initiative seeks funding to cover its expenses (Lewis, 2011). Human resources are also required to manage the project's implementation. Also necessary are stationery, office space, and participation. Human resource specialists will be required to provide guidance on the extent of hiring efforts.

Conclusion

An efficient hiring procedure is essential for any business. Additionally, Resolute Energy Corporation need a new hiring strategy to enable it to obtain the most qualified employees to advance its operations. This research proposal has described the significant steps required in creating a new employment strategy for the oil company.

References

Kerzner, H. (2010). Best practices in project management: achieving global excellence (2nd ed.) Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons

Lewis, J. P. (2011). A practical guide to project planning, scheduling, and control for completing projects on schedule and under budget. (5th ed.). New York, New York: McGraw-Hill

Miller, K., and R. Lawton (2002). The Change Agent's Guide to Substantial Enhancement. ASQ Quality Press, Wisconsin, WI.

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Advanced Marketing Systems Trends Mba Essay Help

Introduction

This is a research paper examining the evolution of marketing management system assistance across a variety of trends. The purpose of this research is to establish a connection between the various phases of this technology evolution and the market systems. Since the introduction of marketing management support systems, marketing operations have undergone numerous structural shifts. Managers are increasingly more worried about the significance of standard technology systems that will assist them in achieving their objectives in the most effective manner.

Purpose

This paper is an analytical research study aiming at examining the impact of technology advancement. It will conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the technological process faced in a changing market context. This research focuses on the evolving marketing systems. The hypothesis that must be investigated is if a technological shift has any effect on these marketing methods.

In the past century, marketing has transformed from a straightforward corporate function into a science-like profession. While identifying a need and meeting it is still the central challenge of marketing, the process has become significantly more sophisticated, with organizations attempting to optimize its worth to the fullest extent. Marketing is the process of planning and executing the development, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods, services, organizations, and events in order to build and maintain relationships that satisfy individual and corporate objectives, according to a standard textbook definition. ” (Boone, 1998).

In this paper, I will divide marketing into two primary segments: 1) Market Research, which is the process by which research and information about customers are gathered, and 2) Marketing Management, which is how marketers use that information to make strategic decisions regarding the four Ps: product, place, promotion, and price. While a number of Marketing Information Systems (MIS) concerned with the collection, storage, and analysis of information and data for marketing decision making purposes have been developed and implemented for market research, the focus of this paper will be on Marketing Decision Support Systems (MDSS) that managers have access to and which enable them to make better use of market research information. I will analyze their evolution and discuss the potential future of MDSS.

Market Management Support Systems

In spite of the fact that the majority of this research work is devoted to Marketing Management Support Systems and its utility in market research, marketing information systems cannot be ignored. To ensure that the collected data is of good quality and relevant to the business or its management, it must be thoroughly evaluated. As with the majority of systems that analyze data, the output information is only as accurate as the input information. Philip Kotler, an eminent professor of international marketing at Northwestern University, provides ten simple questions that can be used to identify marketing managers' information requirements. These questions serve as a framework for managers to evaluate the usefulness of the information they receive.

What decisions do you make frequently? What information is necessary to make these choices? What information do you receive frequently? What special studies do you require periodically? What information would you like that you are not already receiving? What daily information would you require? Weekly? Monthly? Yearly? What periodicals and industry reports would you like to see frequently? Which topics would you like to receive updates on? Which data analysis programs do you require? What are the top four enhancements that could be made to the existing marketing information system?

Based on these questions, Wierenga and Van Bruggen have synthesized eight distinct management systems for use in marketing management decision-making. They resemble:

Marketing Models, which are mathematical models of marketing problems used to determine the most effective marketing tools. The core principle of these systems is that the objectively optimal proposal may be identified. Marketing Information Systems – systems for storing, retrieving, and analyzing data statistically. Marketing information systems aid in the analysis of market events and their possible causes through the manipulation of quantitative data. Marketing Decision Support Systems – enable managers to respond to hypothetical inquiries through simulations. In contrast to marketing information systems, which are primarily passive and solely offer marketing managers with information, marketing decision support systems are interactive and aid managers in making marketing decisions. Managers will generate possible courses of action using logic, and the system will anticipate the effects of these activities. The selection of the most appropriate course of action is determined by the manager's logic and judgment. Marketing Information Systems – a system used to collect the knowledge of a marketing specialist in a particular field and make it accessible in a computer program for addressing problems in that field. The purpose of expert systems is to achieve human-like performance levels. It focuses on the best possible option. Marketing Knowledge-based Systems – acquire knowledge from all accessible sources, including human experts, textbooks, and cases. This system represents knowledge in multiple ways, including rules, semantic networks, and frame-based hierarchies. Knowledge-based systems emphasize the logical technique of decision-makers rather than the optimal answer. Marketing Case-based Reasoning systems – emphasis on problem-solving based on analogical reasoning, a method of problem-solving in which past solutions to similar situations serve as a starting point for the current challenge. These systems store and retrieve data

There are a variety of Marketing Decision Support Systems commercially offered to managers. This constitutes two primary MDSS designs. First, the demographic influence of the store placement model, and second, the impact of store site attributes on the expected financial success of the business. These models are used for the initial setup of the business and are decisions that fall outside the normal decision-making process of marketing managers; therefore, they will not be discussed in this paper.

History of Market Support Management Systems

Utilizing maximizing and minimization functions and linear equations were effective commercial techniques at the beginning of the twentieth century. However, only the most elementary mathematical formulae could be applied by managers in practice. Advanced quantitative statistical tools, such as multiple regression, discriminant analysis, and factor analysis, were above the capabilities of common managers and could not be modified readily for "what-if" scenarios. In the mid-1960s, researchers began examining how combining computers and analytical models may aid managers in making periodic crucial business planning decisions.

The pioneering efforts of individuals such as George Dantzig, Douglas Engelbart, and Jay Forrester likely had an impact on the possibility of developing computerized decision support systems (Power, 2007). In 1952, as a research mathematician at the Rand Corporation, George Dantzig began implementing linear programming on experimental computers. In the middle of the 1960s, Douglas Engelbart and his coworkers created the first hypermedia—groupware system named NLS (oNLine System). NLS assisted in the development of digital libraries for the storage and retrieval of hypertext-based electronic documents. NLS enabled visual teleconferencing on-screen and served as a predecessor to group decision support systems. In 1962, Jay Forrester contributed to the completion of the SAGE (Semi-Automatic Ground Environment) air defense system for North America. SAGE is most likely the first computerized DSS that is driven by data. Professor Forrester also founded the System Dynamics Group at the Sloan School of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Power, 2007).

J.C.R. Licklider, who in 1960 wrote a paper titled “Man-Computer Symbiosis” on the role of multi-access interactive computing in the future, was another influential player in the development of management support systems. He projected that human-computer interaction will improve the quality and efficiency of human problem-solving, and his study laid the foundation for decades of computer research.

In the 1960s, researchers began examining management support systems that use computerized quantitative models to aid in decision making and planning (Raymond, 1966; Turban, 1967; Urban, 1967, Holt and Huber, 1969). With the emergence of stronger microcomputers such as the IBM System 360 and other more powerful mainframe systems, it became more possible and affordable to construct Management Information Systems (MIS) for major businesses (Davis, 1974). However, at this time, MIS focused on providing managers with structured, periodic reports and information derived primarily from accounting and transaction processing systems, but did not offer interactive decision-making support.

Ferguson and Jones conducted the first trial using a computer-aided decision system in 1969 when they examined a production scheduling program running on an IBM 7094. (Power, 2007). However, Michael S. Scott Morton's 1967 Harvard University dissertation covered the construction, implementation, and testing of an interactive, model-driven management decision system. 1966, as part of his research, Scott Morton ran an experiment in which managers utilized a Management Decision System (MDS). Marketing and production managers using an MDS to coordinate laundry equipment production planning. The MDS ran on an IDI 21 inch CRT with a light pen connected to a pair of Univac 494 systems through a 2400 bps modem (Power, 2007).

Business journals began publishing articles on management decision systems, strategic planning systems, and decision support systems in the 1970s (Sprague and Watson 1979). In 1968, for instance, Scott Morton and his colleagues McCosh and Stephens published studies on decision assistance. The phrase decision support system was originally used in a 1971 Sloan Management Review article by Gorry and Scott-Morton. They contended that Management Information Systems were largely concerned with structured decisions and proposed that the supporting information systems for semi-structured and unstructured decisions should be referred to as "Decision Support Systems." Beginning in the 1980s, MMSS achieved a more advanced level of development in which such systems were realized. In the 1980s, the creation of the group decision support system (GDSS) was possibly the most significant contribution to MMSS. This program was developed by researchers at the University of Arizona with the intention of assisting groups with decision-making. When other scientists continued to improve this system's software, the system's development was given authorization.

Kersten created Collaborative Decision Support Systems (CDSSs) in 1985, which could facilitate group negotiation. This facilitated the decision-making process in marketing organizations. This system was further enhanced in 1989 when Lotus launched a program that served to enhance the system's capabilities (CDSS).

In the 1970s and 1980s, the DSS utilized document –Driven storage systems and processing methods, which included the provision of a document retrieval system and the easy use of databases to analyze large document databases. As a result of this advancement, the representation and processing of text could now be accomplished via document outputs.

This technical era's advancement facilitated the development of marketing systems in which data processing could now be performed as text. In 1978, Swanson published the first article on this DSS system. However, this piece was an assessment of the then-existing document-driven approach, which would aid market management more. 1993 was the midpoint of the 1990s, when considerable development work on the system was conducted. This could now enable managers to have complete documentation for every decision they make. As a result of the present advancements in the web system, the document-driven DSS has reached its full potential, in which papers on the managers' job are frequently accessible.

The knowledge-driven DSS was a computer system that was extremely useful for problem-solving expertise. It typically employed knowledge-based principles within a specific field or talent to solve challenges (power 2002). It was created using Artificial Intelligence (AI). In the late 1980s and early 1990s, this proved to be useful. When researchers developed the connecting systems of expert technologies based on the knowledge-driven DSS, knowledge continued to grow.

The system consists of a collection of expert systems created through technological research. They are really handy for producing various action suggestions or even remarks for marketing managers. The system consists mostly of person-computers that can aid in problem-solving. The development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) that aids in detecting potential instances of fraud and irregularities in financial transactions has resulted from the use of DSS with a high level of expertise. In 1983, Huntington's contributions greatly aided in the development of this technology. This information has also helped management schedule their various manufacturing alternatives.

The introduction of web-based DSS in 1995 was possibly the most significant change to the MMSS. It comprised of an internet-based decision support system that may facilitate internet-based marketing message transmission. Its most significant advancement was the advent of HTML 2.0 on the Internet, which included tags and other marketing tables. The emergence of the World Wide Web in 1995, which included a variety of applications, contributed to the growth of decision support systems. Supporting Management Decisions was greatly facilitated by the Internet system's development. In 2000, with the advent of Application Service Providers, the application of software and decision assistance through technical infrastructure was enhanced (ASPs). Currently, the web-based DSS has undergone various advancements, and other MMSS software has been developed based on the web-based DSS's technology.

With the establishment of the International Society for Decision Support (ISDSS) in 1995, decision-making received a significant boost. Between 1996 and 1997, numerous business intranets were built, which aided in information support and knowledge management. This decision support system is made of a variety of tools, including reporting tools, mathematical models employing optimization criteria and process simulations, online analytical processing, and numerous data mining techniques. Various experiments about the establishment of electronic markets in which technology could be utilized continued to be conducted. The most important feature of the creation of computerized DSS was the essence of web-based decision-making support. In companies, the TCP protocol enables computer users to establish a network through a computer server.

Utilization of Market Support Management Systems

Since the beginning of MMSS development, they have had several applications in the marketing system. Perhaps the best marketing relationships can be enhanced between parties significantly more quickly and efficiently. Through the use of a web-based DSS, international marketing has become more efficient, with parties able to disseminate marketing relations in a short time. Through MMSS, other marketing-related software has been improved.

Every area of marketing requires a succession of decisions to be made by groups or parties working together. Due to the evolving nature of company in recent years, marketing decisions have demanded more sophisticated, effective, efficient, and cost-effective means of marketing in consideration of severe regulation, whose documentation system can only be accomplished by a more evolved system. Nonetheless, MMSS has now provided a solution to the problem of rapid marketing decision-making. Marketing decision-making has been simplified by the introduction of Group Decision support systems (GDSSs) and Collaborative Decision support systems (CDSSs). Using these applications, marketing organizations and parties can simply participate in their decisions. Typically, such decisions improved by MMSS give more viable outcomes. Marketing models such

Compensation System Design And Job Analysis Mba Essay Help

Introduction

Compensation schemes are based on a combination of analyses of the internal relationships between roles within an organization. Market-based evaluations of a job's monetary worth are frequently considered by compensation programs. These characteristics are commonly utilized in the internal job appraisal process. In other words, these considerations provide a method for evaluating the position. Professionals in the Human Resource Department are expected to develop theory for three fundamental categories: organization, procedure, and individual performance. Historically, the job of human resource management was the preservation and maintenance of records and data, but it is now also responsible for accounting, marketing, employment, and finances inside a business. Judgment and evaluation of a job are of tremendous importance since they provide the employee and employer with a clear understanding of the task and workload.

Main body

Compensation system components include work description, job analysis, job evaluation, pay structures, compensation survey, rules, and regulations.

There are numerous sorts of compensation, including: base pay, commission, overtime pay, bonuses, profit sharing, and stock options. Transportation, meals, housing allowance, and full medical care.

The following factors are included in the design of compensation systems:

Complexity Education Background Financial impact Acting liberty Management remit Influence on policy Patient welfare Skills Managing responsibilities

One or more of the aforementioned criteria are present in all employment. The extent of their existence may vary based on the organization's surroundings and standing (Compensation system Design, 2008). There are a variety of strategies involved in designing a pay structure for job evaluation. Utilizing statistical approaches to integrate job assessment data with market data yields a structure that must handle both the internal and external competitiveness issues of the business, which is always advantageous in the long term. Every job has a market position, which is determined by comparison to a standard. The level of compensation is one of the most important aspects in determining the employment position's and its market value. Positioning analysis is utilized to assess the status and position of a work based on market values. Management uses compensation for a number of goals to improve the position of the firm. A system's remuneration should be structured to be convenient for employees.

This study is based on the Compensation system design of Small Business Administration human resource specialists (SBA). The Small Business Administration (SBA) was established in 1983 to aid small businesses in order to protect free enterprise and boost the nation's economy as a whole. This position requires highly qualified candidates, and Debbie carter meets those requirements admirably. In a broadband wage structure, jobs are consistently assigned to ranges and bands based on their levels or career stage. The United States Small Business Administration is a government agency, thus it prioritizes external fairness through examining its compensation policy. However, it does not prefer to use compensation programs to determine employee salaries; instead, it follows federal laws and regulations. There are various methods available for work evaluation systems, including the point system, categorization system, ranking system, and factor comparison. The SBA complies with federal requirements regarding employee remuneration. The position of human resource executive is exempt, and salary is based only on performance and credibility. In employment analysis, it has been found that performance measurement determines an employee's aptitude and interest, which aids in remuneration planning. Utilizing the ranking approach, employees are ranked according to their performance. The income or remuneration of an individual depends greatly on job classification. The design of a compensation system is highly dependent on the nature and variety of performance indicators of the employee. There are both sorts of compensation models available with and without performance indicators (Teresa, 2003).

Compensation system Design

Plan of compensation for a human resource officer. Target Implementation Date: 16-Dec-2008 Permanent Salary Position The average income of an SBA human resource manager is $197 per month. However, it differs from business to business.

Philosophy

At the SBA, a strategy for human resource officials combines entitlements with pay for performance principles. A human resource officer will receive monthly compensation, as well as a bonus for meeting standards and demonstrating superior performance. She is also eligible for bonuses, but she will not be compensated for overtime, etc., if she works overtime. The strategy adheres to the WIGI (within-grade raise) policy, so the SBA human resource officer can receive an incentive and her career advancement will be horizontal. As this pay plan follows WIGI, her development would not be vertical.

Establishing internal and external equity Because the SBA is a federal agency, the compensation design will be based on external equity by considering other aspects. The compensation plan will not be based on salary surveys, nor will it permit others to change their pay. According to the pay plan, an employee must complete 52 weeks of employment to be eligible for bonuses and other benefits. The compensation plan will contain incentives for improved performance, health insurance, paid vacations, housing, retirement plausibility, pension, indirect compensation, overtime pay, profit sharing, and medical and travel allowances. This act will be incorporated into this plan to stipulate that, due to poor performance, an employee will receive only base salary, with no allowances or overtime pay. The incentive compensation plan will not comply with municipal regulations. Every year, incentive payments will be made on January 1 and June 30. The strategy would not promote excessive risk-taking. The exempt employee will receive annual compensation and will not be paid overtime. The effect of exempt classified employment would be to cut expenses and increase employee motivation.

The classification approach will be utilized for job and employee analysis, which will aid in the evaluation of employees based on their abilities and performance. Executive professional staff and sales employees will be compensated differently, but using the same performance- and skill-based classification system (Sarah, 2004). The salary range would be determined with market values and business needs in mind. All executive-level positions will be exempt, meaning that all high-level employees, including human resource managers, will receive annual compensation. The appraisal of jobs will be conducted using a matrix organizational review. The salary range will vary from job to position and will be heavily determined by performance, as Herbie Carter's income depends on her degree of performance. The strategy will adhere to external equity by examining compensation practices. This compensation plan will emphasize employee motivation, rewards for the human resource manager, building employee loyalty, job evaluation, employee evaluation, health insurance, paid vacation, housing, child care, indirect and direct compensation, and the maintenance of both external and internal equity.

The strategy will be based on external equity, employee perception, and employment compensation relative to that of another company's employees. This strategy will also be affected by the ranking mechanism used to compare the parallel designations of different personnel. Salary is one of the most essential things that inspires an employee to work hard and remain with an organization for an extended period of time. The pay plan will almost certainly emphasize a base wage in addition to supplementary allowances. To ensure that the compensation plan is equitable and equivalent for all employees, it is essential to maintain compensation plan uniformity. Before executing a pay plan for human resource managers, we will design an optimal compensation policy and stabilize associated expenses, as well as determine internal and external equity. The SBA is a federal entity that adheres to federal regulation. A new compensation scheme will adhere to federal regulations as well. This strategy will also improve employee communication by utilizing a means to inform employees about the company's long-term growth and maintenance of its position. Prior to the implementation of the compensation plan, a meeting will be held to review the entire system and evaluate employee reactions. One expert consultant will also be present prior to the implementation of the compensation plan to make any necessary modifications. Modifications will be made in accordance with employee needs and organizational principles. To establish equitable and comparable wage plans for human resource managers as well as other employees, a variety of approaches will be utilized to rate employees, and various salary software will also be utilized. Different ranking methods, including ordering, weighting, and paid comparison, will be used to evaluate employees and their performance.

References

Teresa Trapani, 2003, Compensation system for improving environmental performance. 2008. Web.

Sarah L., Creative Compensation, Web, 2004.

Compensation system Design, 2008, Compensation Outline, Web.

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Under Armour Inc.’s Porter’s Five Forces Analysis Mba Essay Help

Under Armour, Inc. is a sportswear company founded in 1996 by Kevin Plank. The company's headquarters are located in Baltimore, Maryland, in the United States of America, and it maintains corporate offices in many other states. The company's operations have grown throughout South America, Asia-Pacific, and Europe. In the past, this company's primary objective was to provide T-shirts for American football players. However, this company's business operations have altered. Currently, the company offers an extensive selection of sportswear and apparel for athletes in several professions.

Purpose Statement

This company's management has produced the following mission statement to drive its market strategy: "To make all athletes better through passion, design, and the relentless pursuit of innovation" (Rumelt, 2011, p. 17).

As indicated by the preceding mission statement, the company has implemented innovative ways to develop products to fulfill the requirements of various markets. Its sportswear aims to serve sportsmen from a variety of fields with exclusive goods. The company's tremendous market success can be attributed to the management's grand strategy of producing sportswear for varying weather conditions. This has helped expand the breadth of this company's operations, which has contributed to its market success. This company is currently establishing itself as one of the leading sportswear firms in the United States and Europe. In this case study, the researcher will examine the strategic concerns and external environmental influences affecting Under Armour, Inc.'s operations.

Strategic Concern

Profile and Future Prospects

Under Armour, Inc. has expanded its market activities beyond the limits of the United States and begun selling footwear and accessories in addition to other sportswear. This was a deliberate move intended to boost the company's market revenue. However, the company faces greater market rivalry than it did when it primarily sold T-shirts on the American market. The company is currently confronted with intense rivalry from Nike, Puma, Adidas, and Umbro, among others. The company is extremely competitive in its industry. Competition is not unique to this company, but it poses a significant danger to its success on the worldwide market. This company's strategic success prospects are favorable due to its innovative nature. However, more than inventive techniques will be required to manage the reality of the global market's intense competition.

Strategic Concern

This company's upper management has been committed to using innovation to address the majority of the market difficulties it faces. The moment has come for the company to grasp that its ability to resist both short-term obstacles and broader strategic issues is crucial to its success. The senior management must discover a strategy to deliver shareholder value, increase sales and profitability, and maintain a competitive advantage in the market. The following question identifies a clear strategic issue upon which the report's recommendations will be based.

What short-term and long-term strategic factors should Under Amor, Inc.'s management examine in order to maximize shareholder value, boost sales and profitability, and build a sustainable competitive advantage?

External Evaluation

According to Hall and Yip (2016), the external environment frequently influences the success of a company in a specific market. To acquire a competitive advantage in the market, Under Armour, Inc. must comprehend these external environmental influences and learn how to approach each of them in order to get the desired results.

The Five Forces Analysis of Porter

Using Porter's Five Forces model, it is feasible to comprehend the market environment in which the company will operate. Under Armour, Inc. operates in a market where the threat of new entrants is moderate. Time and money required to enter the market are quite cheap, but the level of specialized knowledge required to compete with this company's current offerings is relatively high. The market has minor entry barriers, but the required production technologies may be costly for new enterprises. These new companies may enter the market, but the procedure may present a number of obstacles. In this sector, competitive rivalry is another crucial issue that must be considered. There are currently a large number of rivals in the business, and the quality distinctions between some of the items are minimal. Customer loyalty is quite high, particularly towards prominent companies such as Adidas, Nike, and Puma. These characteristics make Under Armour, Inc.'s market competition extremely severe. Thus, the company faces the challenging task of gaining the trust of new clients.

The management must also comprehend the influence of customers within the market. The market has a large number of clients, but the most lucrative group consists of organizational buyers. These purchasers are price-sensitive and have considerable bargaining power in a market with several choices. However, the majority of these buyers cannot compromise on quality. Therefore, it is correct to argue that buyer power is strong. Another area of concern is the influence of suppliers. Terpstra, Sarathy, and Foley (2012) state that customers value product delivery consistency. However, this consistency can only be maintained if supplies are consistently available.

This corporation uses a rather large number of suppliers for its raw materials. According to a study by Thompson, the price of obtaining some of these basic minerals has decreased (2016). Nonetheless, a few of the suppliers are relatively substantial organizations with considerable negotiating leverage. On the basis of these variables, it is clear that the supplier power in this business is moderate. The final aspect of this model that Under Armour, Inc. management must comprehend is the threat of substitutes. According to Wallusch (2016), the danger posed by a substitute is mostly decided by the ease with which substitute products can be utilized in place of a certain product, as well as the price of the substitutes. Sporting apparel is nearly irreplaceable. From athletic shoes to sports jerseys, athletes must select the proper apparel and accessories to perform their activities to the best of their abilities. Consequently, the threat posed by replacements in this business is minimal.

Success-Related Factors

Successful businesses have figured out how to manage market pressures and obtain a competitive edge over market rivals. According to Williams (2016), recognizing key success characteristics is crucial because it enables a company to comprehend what it must accomplish in the market to reach the desired level of success. It is beneficial for a company to understand how it can endure despite adverse environmental market factors. In the industry in which Under Armour, Inc. operates, the ability to drive efficiency through e-commerce is one of the most crucial success criteria, since technology is redefining market operations for modern businesses. Under Armour will be able to reach a larger clientele through e-commerce without necessarily having physical storefronts. The strategic impact of this element is that the company will suffer lower operational expenses by emphasizing online client engagement.

Strategic personnel utilization is another crucial success component that management must embrace. According to Wallusch (2016), one of the ways a company can achieve success in a highly competitive business is by adopting creative methods. Innovation should be used to create new and improved products and to devise better ways for delivering such items to market customers. When management engages employees in a manner that fosters creativity, the organization will not only be able to embrace change, but it will become a change agent. The strategic relevance of this feature is that this company's production and marketing tactics will be adaptable and capable of incorporating emerging technologies.

Strategic market segmentation is the third component that Under Armour, Inc.'s management should focus on in the marketplace. Each component of the market segment for sports apparel varies in attractiveness mostly based on the size of the segment. According to Thompson (2016), rather than offering a wide selection of sportswear, a company may need to find the most desirable market segments and devise the most creative means of satisfying the needs of the selected segments. Under Armour, Inc. may choose segments with a view on satisfying its needs optimally. The segment must also be sizable enough to support the activities of this business. This aspect has the strategic connotation that this company would manufacture products to fulfill the specific requirements of the targeted market segments.

Industry Characteristics and Attractiveness

The preceding examination of the features of the sportswear business demonstrates that this company must be prepared for both opportunities and risks, especially given its decision to expand its activities outside the United States. Even among non-athletes, the growing popularity of sportswear is creating an enormous market for Under Armour, Inc. and other companies in this area. In regions such as China, India, Brazil, and Japan, where the middle class is expanding, the purchasing power of customers is rising. However, the company must be prepared to face fierce rivalry, the strength of its suppliers and customers, and the threat of new entrants into its existing markets. The nature of the industry, especially in terms of profitability, is very tempting to incumbents. The industry's outlook is favorable due to the increasing popularity of numerous sports in various regions of the world. However, the aforementioned obstacles may impede Under Armour's ability to capitalize on these new prospects.

Company Circumstances

Under Armour has become a prominent player in the global sportswear business; it is essential to analyze the company's current standing and market activities. Conducting a thorough financial and SWOT analysis will aid in assessing the market position of the organization.

Financial Analysis

Conducting a complete financial analysis of Under Armour, Inc. and a few of its significant market competitors may help to determine the current market condition. One of the most significant elements to study is the company's sales growth rate; therefore, Under Armour, Inc's sales growth rate will help to determine its market growth. Under Armour's sales revenue for the fiscal year that concluded on December 31, 2014, was $3,084,370 USD. This value climbed by 28.5% to reach $3,963,313 USD.

On the international market, this company's top three competitors are Adidas, Puma, and Nike. As indicated in the appendix, the average sales revenue of these three main competitors has decreased over the past three years. Adidas's sales revenue for the years ending in 2015, 2014, and 2013 were USD 695,00, USD 600,000, and USD 1,089,000, respectively. These data indicate a constant reduction in sales, which suggests that the market's lifecycle is in a declining phase. It appears that the only option for enterprises in this market to achieve success is to reinvent themselves and develop products that fit the specific needs of their customers.

Profitability index

Under Armour, Inc.'s profitability ratios indicate that the company's operations are profitable. As a minor player on the worldwide market compared to Nike and Adidas, it is evident that the company is generating outstanding earnings. This is evidence that the company has been making sound strategic growth decisions on the market.

Liquidity ratio

The liquidity ratios help determine a company's ability to meet its financial obligations in light of its liquidity. Analysis of Under Armour, Inc.'s liquidity measures, in particular the cash ratio, indicates that the company can pay its financial obligations.

Capital ratio

According to Williams (2016), a company should not substantially rely on debt to finance its operations. Under Armour, Inc.'s leverage ratios indicate that the corporation relies more on debt than shareholders' equity to finance its operations.

Activity quotient

According to the activity ratios mentioned in the appendix, this business has a moderate capacity to transform its assets and liabilities into cash via sales.

SWOT Analysis

Conducting a SWOT analysis aids in comprehending this company's internal environment and how it may impact operations. Under Armour, Inc.'s inventive abilities are its greatest strength. The firm developed Cold-Gear, a line of specialized winter apparel for athletes that is designed to keep them warm when playing or practicing in extremely cold temperatures. The company also created Hot-Gear, which is designed to keep the body cool during hot weather conditions and is intended for players. This company's other creative items include Tuff-Gear, Street-Gear, and All-Season-Gear. These products give this company an advantage over its market competitors.

As a sportswear manufacturer, Under Armour, Inc. has a number of limitations that may hinder its usual operations. The company's main flaw is its lack of experience in some overseas markets. The company has not yet mastered emerging markets in Asia and parts of Africa. Its financial capacity is likewise inferior to those of its market competitors. According to Thompson (2016), there are opportunities in the sportswear industry. In practical terms, the expanding middle class in Asia and parts of Africa represents a tremendous potential. The company should also capitalize on the rising demand for athletic apparel in international markets. Competition is the firm's greatest threat.

Recommendations

Recommendations Concerning Strategy

Based on the preceding research, Under Armour, Inc. must examine a variety of criteria. The following are the recommended strategies for this company to consider.

By establishing innovation centers in diverse regions, the management of this organization should stimulate innovation among its personnel. The company should consider expanding its operations into new African and Asian areas. Under Armour should diversify its market offerings in order to increase its revenue stream.

Objectives

The purpose of the aforementioned recommendations is to provide Under Armour Inc. with a competitive advantage over its market competitors. If implemented, the business will continue its path of market innovation.

Strategic Argumentation

The supplied advice will enable Under Armour Inc. to achieve a distinct competitive position in the market. The innovation center will afford this company the ideal opportunity to foster innovation in its operations. Current markets in which this company competes are quite competitive. This company's expansion into new markets will create new markets. Diversification into new items will also aid in the creation of alternative revenue streams and make it simpler to combat the threat posed by potential substitute products.

References

Hall, D., and J. Yip (2016). Discerning workplace career cultures. 174–184 in Organizational Dynamics, 45(3). Web.

Rumelt, R. (2011). The distinction between good and poor strategy and why it matters London, United Kingdom:

Terpstra, V., R. Sarathy, and J. Foley (2012). International commerce. Naper Publishing Group, New York, New York

A. Thompson (2016). Concepts and examples of formulating and executing strategy in pursuit of competitive advantage. New York, New York: Cengage

Williams, Edward F. (2016). How green giants transform sustainability into billion-dollar enterprises. New York, New York: Cengage

Wallusch, J. (2016). (2016). Global television market selection. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons. Case study of Time Warner Inc.

Appendices

Porter's Five Forces Model is shown in Appendix 1.

Appendix 2: A SWOT Evaluation

Strengths

Highly original Dedicated administration

Weaknesses

a less popular brand comparatively little market share

Opportunities

The increasing demand for sportswear The expanding size of the Asian market's middle class

Threats

Aggressive market competition Obsolete technologies

Financial Analysis in Appendix 3

Ratios de rendement

Profit ratio Gross profit margin equals profit margin divided by net sales equals 48.1%

Return on property Return on assets equals net income divided by average total assets = 3.68

Return on investment 6.3% Return on equity equals net income divided by average shareholder's equity.

Liquidity Ratios

Present ratio Current ration = current assets/current liabilities = 3.13

Rapid ratio Quick ratio = (cash and equivalents plus short-term investments plus accounts receivable) / current liabilities = 1.40

Funds ratio Cash ratio = (cash plus cash equivalents plus invested funds)/current liabilities = 1.60

Leverage Rations

Debt/equity Total debt divided by total equity is 1.72.

Interest protection Interest coverage = Operating Income divided by Interest Expense = 5.10

Activity Cycles

Ratio of inventory turnover Inventory turnover ratio = Net sales divided by average inventory = 0.1 percent

ratio of total asset turnover Turnover ratio of total assets = Net sales/ assets = 39.5%

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Wal-Mart’s Recruitment And Retention Program Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Analysis problem Organizational architecture and structure Teams and teamwork Leadership and administration strategy Organization culture Conclusion Recommendations References

Introduction

Management is the practice of achieving objectives through other people in an effective and efficient manner (Agarwal 2008, p.302). These activities consist of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, and are generally referred to as the four functions of management.

Planning is the process by which an organization determines its future actions (Hill and Jones 2009, p.381). In conjunction with the planning function, the organizing function guarantees that the firm's available resources are maximized and distributed strategically. Lastly, controlling is viewed as monitoring the progress in accordance with the initial plan and enforcing adjustments when necessary if feedback indicates that things are not aligned with the plan (Mullins 2010, p.34).

Therefore, organization management is the act of building a relationship between people and resources in order to achieve particular objectives and business goals (Agarwal 2008, p.303). Management of an organization is founded on five principles: procedure, scope of control, unity of command, homogeneous assignment, delegation of authority, and adaptability.

Organization management is a five-step process, the first of which entails identifying the tasks involved, taking into account the nature of the job, the credentials required for the job, and the time required to complete the assignment (Mullins 2010, p.35). The second phase is to subdivide big jobs into individual activities; the numerous possible tasks will be portioned as stand-alone projects that may be carried out independently by different departments (Triplet 2007, p.3).

The third step involves allocating specific activities to individuals; at this stage, the organization must determine the capabilities of each employee before assigning available assignments. The tasks are matched to the individual and assigned to the person most capable of completing them efficiently. The fourth step is to give the available resources to help individuals in successfully completing their assigned jobs (Moyles 2006, p.176). The organization allocates resources based on the nature and complexity of the allocated work. The final step involves building an organizational structure to decide the strategy that will merge the numerous allocated tasks into one once they are accomplished and how the various organizational structures can collaborate (Picot et al., 2008, p.12).

Managers in an organization should recognize the significance of organization and management, the process through which people, diverse jobs, and technology are blended and coordinated to achieve organizational goals (Triplet 2007, p.4). Bob and Lloyd must see the importance of linking the people, tasks, and resources in the fast-food company process. Bob and Lloyd must make optimal use of the organization's resources to complete all tasks and implement their fast food company concepts (Triplet 2007, p.5). Organization and management should be based on determining the policies, missions, and structures of the fast food firm (McNichol et al 2007, p.13).

Analysis problem

Bob and Lloyd's choice to launch a fast food restaurant in Cambridge will be a wise investment if they properly evaluate the organization and administration of the business. In Cambridge's fast food market, their success rate will be determined by how they establish structure, assemble their team, exercise leadership, and address organizational culture. Bob and Lloyd must carefully analyze the following four factors before making strategic judgments regarding their new venture (Chen 2004, p.5).

Organizational architecture and structure

An organizational structure is a network of interconnected jobs, job groups, and ultimately authority (Burstein 1991, p.327). A structure of an organization specifies how individuals are placed into departments and departments are grouped to form the organization. It comprises the creation of mechanisms to ensure effective departmental communication, integration, and coordination of efforts. Typically, an organizational chart depicts the formal relationships within an organization, including the number of levels in the hierarchy and the scope of control of managers and supervisors (Schriber and Gutek 2010, p.642). Bob and Lloyd must choose an organizational structure that corresponds to the span of control (Alder and Jelinek 2006, p.74). Each individual's function and responsibilities must be specified within the organizational structure of the fast food establishment.

The objective of an organization structure is to give a common reference that demonstrates the general relationship between upper management, middle management, and lower level management (Murphy and Willmot 2010, p.268). Traditional organization models always placed the CEO on top, with everyone else grouped in layers according to department, however today there are numerous decentralized and flexible organization systems. Bob and Lloyd should establish a structure that improves horizontal coordination and communication, despite the absence of a traditional organizational structure, in order to promote change adoption (Burstein 1991, p.327). In a fast food industry, a horizontal organizational structure will decentralize decision-making. The first diagram below depicts a contemporary organizational structure with three management levels. (Burstein 1991, p.327).

Three managerial levels.

One of the four factors that help a corporation develop its organizational structure is job specification, which entails outlining the departments' responsibilities (Barry 2000, p.33). The second is departmentalization, in which positions are grouped and responsibilities are assigned in accordance with the company's objectives. The third aspect is span of control, in which the management examines the tasks at hand and the number of units and, as a result, merges the two factors in an advantageous manner (Chen 2004, p.6). The final aspect is delegation of authority, which introduces managers in charge of units and gives the head of each unit the capacity to make decisions on behalf of the organization. Bob and Lloyd ought to distribute control to the managers of the fast food company so that they may make decisions with ease. Each unit department's managers should make choices on behalf of the organization.

Teams and group effort

In order to turn around an organization, management must support a team-based approach. Consistently, management gurus have asserted that a team exceeds an individual in terms of passion, focus, and overcoming formidable obstacles. (Mullins 2010, p.46)

A team is a small group of individuals with complementary skills and a shared purpose for which they all feel accountable (Katzenbach and Smith 1993, p.68). Bob and Lloyd must adhere to the five team standards in order to establish a formidable team for the fast-food hamburger enterprise.

The team for one must be modest, ideally between two to twenty-five members, because it is easier to collaborate with a small group (Hill and Jones 2009, p.385). The second concept is that team members must possess complementary abilities (Leitner 2004, p.35). The third principle states that members should share a common purpose and objective, which means that the team's objective and mission must coincide (Hill and Jones 2009, p.384). The fourth principle is that the team must build a shared working style in which the team pays attention to administrative and work-related aspects and each team member identifies their position in the team's work (Picot et al 2008, p.84). The final principle emphasizes that all members must be accountable to themselves and to others in order to ensure the commitment and trust of other members (Katzenbach and Smith 1993, p.68). The diagram below depicts a paradigm change in a team system, often known as a team structure (Picot et al 2008, p.84).

Team structure.

For the sake of strategic team building, Bob and Lloyd should carefully pick and staff their employees so that they have a motivated, vital workforce. The fast food sector necessitates qualified, quick, and efficient employees; else, the business could fail (McNichol et al 2007, p.2007). Staffing corresponds to human resource planning; here, the organization should evaluate the number of personnel required, their backgrounds, their credentials, and the cost of recruiting each one in order to achieve its objectives. Consideration must also be given to how to get the necessary personnel, with recruitment considerations including education, experience, human relations, communication skills, and motivation (Northouse 2009, p.165).

When undertaking employee selection, management should devise an elimination-based method for selecting the most qualified individuals. Having a set of criteria and a score sheet for each candidate guarantees that the organization will have a high rate of successful hires (Baligh 2006, p.126). The organization must define each interview, develop a strategy, communicate with the interviewee during the interview, and establish a conclusion for the interview. Bob and Lloyd should perform an in-person interview to determine whether or not each employee have strong interpersonal skills (Chen 2004, p.7).

Motivation is a crucial part of every firm; if the employees are not motivated, they will inevitably produce less (Sekhar 2010, p.16). Increases in working conditions, interpersonal relationships, income, job security, company regulations, supervision, and administration are examples of motivating factors (Sekhar 2010, p.17). Bob and Lloyd should motivate their fast food staff by providing them with favorable working conditions and bonuses.

Leadership and administration strategy

A leader is a person who directs a group of people, an organization, or a nation (Leitner 2004, p.87). To the followers, a leadership model according to Mitchell, Margaret and Casey, John, professors of leadership management at the University of Illinois (2007) emphasizes a collective strategy that involves all members and includes elements such as improving the overall performance, focusing specifically on strategy, and creating an environment of change (p.53).

Second, employing a collaborative approach begins to foster excellent community connections because everyone is represented, so laying the groundwork for collaborations within the institution, which benefits the entire community (p.58). A skilled leader will most effectively unite all members in a strategic manner to work together; he or she must also be intelligent and inspiring (McNichol et al 2007, p.104). In addition, a leader should propose innovative tactics that are effective and will provide positive performance outcomes; this will serve as motivation for all members.

Manpower planning would be the optimal strategy for implementing "imposed-incremental change" in an organization (Cooper 2005, p.231).

Cooper Crown (2005), a professional management guru and consultant in management issues, defines manpower planning as the process of forecasting and planning the human resource organization in every institution in order to plan for the future in accordance with the institution's goals and organizational structure (p.232).

The competency is intended to be useful when an organization has limited funds to spend yet must carry out its activities (Northouse 2009, p.168).

Well, the best approach to strengthen one's leadership characteristics is to develop skills in manpower planning, which will allow for the regulation of projects and the establishment of a structured workforce to complete the duties.

In order to achieve strong leadership, a leadership mission entails deciding on long-term and short-term objectives and allocating priority to methods (Moyles 2006, p.178; Bass and Avolio 1993, p1). A competent leader should have a strategy formula that focuses on effective resource allocation, making judgments on diversifications, and entering overseas marketplaces to combine and participate in an organization's initiative. A leader's strategy commits the organization to a defined vision, mission, and objective over a prolonged period of time in order to achieve it (Northouse 2009, p.169; Moyles 2006, p.179).

The success of policy implementation depends on the capacity of the leadership function to motivate others to assist in strategy redesign (Moyles 2006, p.179) Redesigning an organization's process enhances it and helps it adapt to external environmental restrictions over which the leader has no control (Murphy and William 2010, p. 268). Bob and Lloyd should construct a strategy-support culture at the fast food industry and establish an effective and functional structure in order to ensure policy implementation (Moyles 2006, p.522). Bob and Lloyd must encourage the managers of each unit and the staff to discover methods to contribute to the implementation process (Normore 2010). Implementation involves personal discipline, commitment and sacrifice. This is due to the fact that at this time is seen as unstable and requires everyone to embrace new systems (Picot et al 2008, p.86).

Organization culture

The word organization culture refers to a set of characteristics that are unique to a given organization and can be derived from the manner in which an organization develops and identifies the characteristics of cultures that promote learning and those that impede the learning organization process (Adler and Jelinek 2006, p.74).

Organizational culture encourages the learning process. Today's organizations are under a great deal of pressure to perform, which requires them to learn, adapt, and take ethically sound actions in order to meet the demands of the industry and the shareholders (Schriber and Gutek 2010, p.645).

According to McNichol et al. (2007), there are a variety of corporate learning culture approaches. The three most prevalent categories are (p.104):

A supportive organization learning culture is one in which team members or the management of an organization provide assistance for learning. Concretizing organizational learning culture: when the learning culture is founded on concrete procedures and practices, such as billing, logistics, and product development (Mullins 2010, p.35). Leadership organizational learning culture: a technique that employs leadership to reinforce learning inside an organization. This indicates that the leader in the organization must study the organization's constraints, acknowledge them, and explore alternatives to improve the organization's performance in order to steer the learning process (Sekhar 2010, p.17).

Organizational learning is under pressure to keep up with the shifting patterns of the times. In the past, people were not required to make quick decisions, but today they must do so in uncertain circumstances. A learning organization is an entity in which employees successfully transfer knowledge (Leitner 2004, p.89).

By attempting to develop an effective learning organization, the fast food corporation will demonstrate its efforts to rethink the organization culture process. There are two strategies to improve an organization's learning strategy. The first is a single-loop learning process that involves modifying the environment without altering the organization's structures (Chen 2004, p.8). The second consists of a double loop in which new systems are implemented and the learning process is redefined and tested (Murphy and Willmot 2010, p.270). Bob and Lloyd should come up with innovative ideas for the development of the fast food company and the establishment of a competitive edge in Cambridge. Chen (2004) specifies, if it is a single-loop, the condition.

Whole Foods Market Corporation In China Mba Essay Help

Executive Synopsis

Whole Foods Market is a multinational American company that focuses in selling organic foods. In China, the corporation has discovered a dissatisfied market niche. Therefore, it plans to capitalize on the market by opening stores in major cities such as Beijing, Shanghai, and Hangzhou. China experienced a food scandal a few years ago. Since then, the majority of Chinese are apprehensive of the country's food safety. They are frightened of purchasing locally supplied food products. Indeed, the majority of Chinese prefer to purchase imported foods. The country has witnessed the expansion of a health-conscious market sector since the scandal. The vast majority of city dwellers favor organic foods. These individuals have a substantial amount of disposable income. In addition, they lead a healthy lifestyle. Customers are only concerned with the quality of the food they consume and are willing to pay high costs if quality is assured. The bulk of Chinese continue to migrate to urban areas. Thus, the nation's desire for organic foods continues to rise. Few businesses now deal with organic foods. They carry limited supplies of organic items, making it difficult for them to meet market demand.

Whole Foods Market plans to enter the Chinese market in order to meet the growing demand for organic foods. The company will prioritize high-end clients. They consist of employed adults with substantial discretionary income. The organization will open retail locations in Beijing, Shanghai, and Hangzhou. Whole Foods Market will strive to develop superior products due to the awareness of food quality among affluent customers. It will charge a premium for its products to cover production costs. To promote its brand, the corporation will adopt an integrated communication approach. In addition, it will collaborate with local farmers and supermarkets to promote the distribution of organic foods.

Introduction

The latest food scandal in China has caused many citizens to question the quality of local food goods. Today, the majority of Chinese prefer to purchase imported food items because they perceive them to be more secure. The majority of Chinese are willing to spend a great deal of money on foreign food items. The desire for imported healthy foods in China has presented numerous international enterprises with a potential business opportunity. The nation has set rigorous food production regulations. Manufacturers are responsible for the additives they employ in their products. Despite the passage of the food safety regulation, the demand for foreign-origin products continues to rise.

In the past decade, food imports have more than doubled, according to Paul and Rana (414). Research indicates that by 2018, China would be the major importer of foreign food items (Paul and Rana 416). Cereals, edible vegetable oils, and milk products make up the majority of China's imports of food. The majority of food importers focus on organic items. Originally, natural products were considered a premium item. Nonetheless, as Chinese disposable income continues to rise, the demand for organic food products has expanded substantially. According to a study done in Shanghai and Beijing, the majority of Chinese consumers are willing to pay a premium for organic items. It emphasizes the rationale behind Whole Foods Market's intention to open outlets in China. This study contains Whole Foods Market's China marketing plan.

Market Analysis

Whole Foods Market Inc.'s past

Whole Goods Market Inc. is an American supermarket business that offers foods without artificial preservatives, colors, flavors, sweeteners, and hydrogenated fats, according to Harbin and Humphrey (5). It was the first company in the United States to receive approval to sell organic products. In 1980, Whole Foods Market was founded. Its main office is located in Austin, Texas. The company currently operates over 431 locations in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada. Additionally, nearly 91,000 employees have been hired. According to Harbin and Humphrey, Whole Foods Market has increased its market share through targeting women (8). In addition, it has bought a number of businesses around the United States. For example, the corporation acquired seven Dominick's Finer Foods locations in Chicago in 2014. Despite its acquisition strategy, the corporation has sold a large number of stores that did not contribute to its achievement of its goals.

Whole Foods Market has developed its own quality criteria. The corporation ensures that all of its products adhere to these criteria. It ensures the absence of hydrogenated fats, preservatives, artificial flavors, and sweeteners in the products. In addition, the organization does not deal with milk or meat from genetically modified animals. Whole Foods Market leads the struggle against environmental deterioration. The organization manufactures eco-friendly items. It sells "many organic foods and products certified by the United States Department of Agriculture that aim to be environmentally friendly and ecologically responsible" (Yin et al. 1364). The company's website describes the guidelines it adheres to while selling dietary supplements, meals, and personal care products.

By marketing health-conscious items, Whole Foods Market seeks to provide clients with a new lifestyle. The organization ensures that individuals have a high quality of life by controlling what they eat. Currently, many individuals are both environmentally and health-conscious. The majority of consumers prefer to purchase products that adhere to established environmental and health standards. Whole Foods Market has a huge number of dedicated clients in the United States. The company's experience in the development of organic products has earned them the nickname "Google" in this industry.

A summary of Whole Foods Market

According to Paul and Rana, the worldwide organic food and beverage market will reach $211.44 billion by 2020. (417). As consumers become more health-conscious, global demand for non-organic foods continues to fall. Numerous health benefits are related with the use of organic foods. It highlights the reason why their global demand continues to rise. A 2014 survey conducted in China revealed that the demand for organic foods has increased dramatically. The nation-wide food scandal has caused many customers to be skeptical about the things they purchase. At least 80% of Chinese citizens are dissatisfied with the food security situation in the country (Paul and Rana 420). Therefore, they have resorted to importing organic foods that they believe are manufactured in accordance with recognized safety standards. China's economy is powered by coal. As a result, the country is plagued by severe environmental pollution. The majority of Chinese are concerned that heavy metals from mining and industry may contaminate the soil and rivers, hence polluting food (Pei et al. 414). Consequently, many individuals prefer to purchase organic food products.

The rate of urbanization in China has led to the expansion of the organic food sector. Many individuals continue to relocate to the rapidly expanding cities. In exchange, they no longer have access to food sources. Therefore, they seek alternative sources. China has a high demand for imported goods and organic foods at present. The number of stores selling organic foods has increased in major cities such as Beijing and Shanghai (Paul and Rana 421). The stores cater to expatriate communities and middle-class families with a high discretionary income. Despite the high demand for organic foods in China, the country's output remains modest. China is dependent on natural product imports from abroad. Therefore, international businesses have the potential to leverage the country's vast market. China is anticipated to be the global leader in organic food imports by 2018.

Analysis of SWOT Strengths

Whole Foods Market has a long history in the organic food market. Consequently, the organization can produce products of the greatest quality. In fact, quality is what sets Whole Foods Market apart from other companies. The company obtains and retains a substantial proportion of loyal customers. It does not employ typical ingredients found in other grocery stores. They contain synthetic flavors and hydrogenated oils. Maintaining high standards enables the business to charge premium rates for its items without losing clients. The organization offers an educated clientele with a substantial amount of disposable income. In addition to quality, Whole Foods Market benefits from favorable industry trends. Many people currently prefer to purchase organic foods because they do not pose a health risk.

As customers continue to recognize the significance of healthy eating, the organic food market is likely to increase. Therefore, Whole Foods Market will continue to profit from market share increase (Zapeda and Deal 701). The bulk of Chinese citizens are concerned with food manufacturing techniques. Whole Foods Market is famous for adhering to food safety regulations. Therefore, the majority of Chinese will not hesitate to purchase the company's items. Creativity and innovation are further Whole Foods Market assets. Due to its extensive experience in the business, the company has mastered the production of organic meals. In addition, it has developed novel, low-cost methods of generating organic products. Therefore, the corporation generates a substantial profit from its products. The organizational culture of Whole Foods Market allows it to retain a motivated workforce. It helps to increase the company's productivity and reduce its operating expenses. The business rarely requires recruiting and training new staff.

Weaknesses

Consumer attitude is one of Whole Foods Market's vulnerabilities. Despite having a large consumer base, some individuals consider that the company's pricing are too high. Some customers have given Whole Foods Market the moniker “Whole Paycheck” because they feel it is possible to spend a whole paycheck on the company's items. However, it ensures that customers receive value for their money by providing high-quality products. The corporation is primarily dependent on the American market. Consequently, it is likely to sustain a substantial loss in the case of a recession in the United States. Whole Foods Market does not yet operate in China. Thus, the company's brand recognition on the Chinese market is weak. The business relies on a limited number of suppliers. As a result, it would be difficult for Whole Foods Market to grow its operations at a fast rate.

Opportunities

Whole Foods Market has a potential to increase its market share in nations without its outlets, such as China. The corporation can extend its pool of suppliers by communicating with organic growers in China. It would allow the company to expand its operations in China. Additionally, the company can form partnerships with local supermarkets. It would aid in reaching a large customer base. In contrast, Whole Foods Market may increase its market share by offering competitive prices. Currently, only wealthy individuals are the company's target market, as its items are priced at a premium. A little price cut would enable the business to attract a large consumer base. By investing in technology, the business might increase its sales volume. It would be challenging for Whole Foods Market to have locations in every major and minor city. However, by offering online buying options, the business can reach a vast number of people. Most Chinese own smartphones. The organization can invest in a mobile application to reach customers who may not have the time to shop in-person.

As more and more millennials enter the workforce in China, the market share of organic products continues to increase. In addition, an increasing number of women are entering the workforce, which increases their disposable income (Yan 709). The majority of organic product purchasers are female. Therefore, Whole Foods Market is expected to profit from an increase in women's discretionary income. Alterations in Chinese lifestyle and consumption patterns are further potential Whole Foods Market could explore. The Chinese today prefer to live a healthy lifestyle. They are cognizant of what they consume. It emphasizes why many individuals purchase organic items.

Threats

Whole Foods Market faces a variety of threats. Global warming is one of the threats. Changes in the climate are expected to impact the company's organic product output. Additionally, the company confronts competition from competitor businesses. Carrefour, Wal-Mart, and Century Mart are poised to pose a substantial threat to Whole Foods Market on the Chinese market. The primary product of Wal-Mart is the provision of retail services. The business carries a limited selection of organic products. It eliminates Wal-ability Mart's to exploit the Chinese market. According to Harbin and Humphrey, Wal-Mart offers low-cost merchandise (12). The company consistently promotes cost reductions. Consequently, it attracts numerous customers. Indeed, Wal-Mart dominates the Chinese market with its cost leadership strategy. Despite offering low-priced products, the company offers a limited number of organic foods. Thus, Whole Foods Market can profit from the enormous amount of organic food manufacturing.

Walmart employs an effective promotional strategy. The corporation markets its products through sales promotions, public relations, advertising, and personal selling. Utilizing an effective promotional mix allows the business to reach a large client base and attract a large number of customers. Additionally, it has the opportunity to convince customers to acquire its items. Walmart's distribution approach is "intensive" (Harbin and Humphrey 16). The organization has multiple locations in China's major cities. In addition, it continues to open stores to reach a large number of people. The corporation markets itself as socially conscious to convince customers that it cares about their requirements. The method allows Wal-Mart to attract numerous customers because it allows them to shop based on their preferences.

Since 1995, Carrefour has been present on the Chinese market. The company markets itself as culturally compatible with China. Despite at least two decades in China, the company offers a limited selection of organic food goods. It prevents Carrefour from gaining access to the vast Chinese market. In addition, the company's items are sold at standard prices. It enables Carrefour to generate considerable sales and compete effectively with major corporations such as Wal-Mart. Numerous tactics are employed by Carrefour to promote its products. The company markets organic products through personal selling, public relations, advertising, and sales promotion (Ortega et al. 319). Occasionally, Carrefour offers discounts to customers to encourage them to purchase additional items. Initially, the company only had locations in major metropolitan areas. The organization has locations in both residential and business regions in Shanghai. It targets those with a high income.

Century Mart has been present in China for over 25 years. The company markets itself as a one-stop shop where customers may obtain all of their needs. Century Mart carries organic products. However, the items are sold in modest numbers. Therefore, it is unable to fulfill the Chinese market. Compared to other retailers, such as Carrefour, Century Mart offers organic products at lower costs. The reduced pricing of organic products are intended to encourage consumers to purchase the items. The business use numerous channels

Farmers Trading Company’s Brand Management Mba Essay Help

Introduction

Farmers Trading Company has a long history of business and has become a recognized brand. Since its founding in 1909 in New Zealand, the department store network has expanded to 59 locations throughout the country. However, market conditions have altered as more competitors have opened department shops, reducing Farmers Trading Company's profit margins. Brand marketing is one of the tactics that can help the firm grow earnings, enhance the customer experience, and enhance Farmers Trading Company's reputation.

This report is created for Farmers Trading Company's managing directors. This research on brand marketing intends to investigate the specifics of brand marketing, explain its significance to individual consumers, discuss the potential and problems posed by New Zealand's diverse population, and make recommendations for Farmers Trading Company. The organization of this study is as follows: after the introduction, the discussion section provides a synthesis of the literature on brand marketing, describing essential principles and discussing the importance of brand marketing.

The section on recommendations that follows has various suggestions that Farmers Trading Company might integrate into its long-term and short-term marketing strategy to boost profitability. The conclusion summarizes the important themes of this paper on brand marketing. This paper focuses on brand marketing as it pertains directly to department store chains. The focus will be on the definition, important details of applying brand marketing in New Zealand, and potential obstacles. Different brand marketing methods will not be covered in this study.

Discussion

Brand Marketing – Definition

Initially, it is essential to identify brand marketing and describe its fundamental qualities. According to Gil (2020), enhancing brand equity requires a specialized approach to managing product and customer communication. In essence, this means that a business can design a plan for communicating its value to customers. According to Natarelli and Plapler (2017), brand marketing is the establishment of a relationship with the customer based on shared values, beliefs, and performance expectations. This strategy places a greater emphasis on the relationships between an organization and its clients, with a particular focus on their mutual effects.

Others, such as Arbouw, Ballantine, and Ozanne (2019), Barnes and Higgins (2020), and Sexton (2015), assert that brands are parts of a company's image, including a logo, reputation, marketing efforts, and consumer communication. While these definitions are accurate, they confine the scope of brand marketing to particular brand traits, which cannot be considered a marketing strategy. This paper concludes that band marketing is the building of a relationship between a firm and its target audience using various communication channels. In general, different authors present varying definitions of brand marketing, although there are a number of defining traits.

The objective of brand marketing

A firm's brand is one of its most valuable assets, meaning that it contributes to the value of the company. Brand marketing's major objective is to raise the perceived value of a company's offering from the customer's perspective (Shin, Casidy, Yoon & Yoon, 2016). This is the reason why brand-focused marketing initiatives do not imply direct sales. Instead, they create awareness of an organization in order to explain its activities, such as a strategy to sell only sustainable items. This enables consumers to choose firms that align with their values and views. Possibly, this link can exist without a direct use of brand marketing, but in this instance, a firm is missing out on a potential to garner greater interest in its offering. In addition, higher demand, the justification of premium prices, and client loyalty are the primary outcomes of brand marketing (Bailey, 2016; Hanssens & Pauwels, 2016; Natarelli & Plapler, 2017). Therefore, brand marketing affords organizations numerous opportunities.

A well-established brand can assist businesses in overcoming brand crises and other organizational problems. Media articles that attract negative attention to a brand are typical in today's society (Hewett, & Lemon, 2019; Hollenbeck, 2018; Hsu, & Lawrence, 2016). Occasional issues, such as product recalls, misunderstandings, or controversial situations, can have a negative impact on a company's income; but, by creating a relationship with customers and retaining their loyalty, firms can respond effectively to these disruptive events. This implies that Farmers Trading Company will be able to use its existing brand to address problems, such as potential conflicts, and develop stronger communication with consumers. Since brand management enables organizations to obtain instantaneous client feedback, responsiveness as an intrinsic component of a brand becomes very important (Capelli & Tavis, 2016; Luxton, Reid, & Mavondo, 2017). In the case of Farmer Trading Corporation, this crisis has a negative effect on earnings.

Why do individual consumers value brands?

Individual customers are reliant on brands because they subconsciously demonstrate a preference for a specific brand that reflects their values or socioeconomic standing. For instance, Natarelli and Plapler (2017) contend that when a person is asked about his or her favorite automobile, the reply will mention a specific brand. Similar examples can be observed in people's daily lives when they make purchasing selections and select reputable businesses. This interaction between a consumer and a brand permits both parties to influence one another (Natarelli & Plapler, 2017; Hanssens, 2020; Orazi, Spry, Theilacker & Vredenburg, 2017). Therefore, brands can influence the behavior of their consumers to some extent, whereas customers can urge businesses to develop new goods to meet the requirements of their target market.

Challenges

The population of New Zealand has become more diverse throughout time. This leads in a change in consumer tastes and needs, presenting Farmers Trading Company with a unique challenge: to evaluate new consumer segments, their values, and build a product and marketing plan that corresponds to these qualities. Specifically, Natarelli and Plapler (2017) assert that enterprises must address the preferences of the next generation of consumers, the Millennials, in order to meet the problems of the contemporary business climate. The demographic shifts indicate a shift in purchasing and decision-making habits and necessitate revised marketing methods, including a brand-centric approach. This presents unique challenges in the context of brand marketing, as it is essential to tailor efforts aimed at communicating brand identity to the unique and diverse population of New Zealand, which requires the use of multiple channels, including social media (Chen, Nguyen, and Melewar, 2016; Pace, Balboni, and Gistri, 2017; Porcu, Del Barrio-Garca, and Kitchen, 2017). Millennials develop a unique relationship with brands, with social media and influencers playing a significant role in their purchasing decisions.

Opportunities

In addition, the advent of online shopping in New Zealand can represent a further obstacle for Farmers trading, reflecting population shifts. According to the National Australia Bank's (2019) research, department retailers continue to expand their market presence, including their online sales. The sales estimates for several industries, including department stores, are shown in chart 1. This gives a methodology for evaluating the issues faced by department shops in New Zealand based on a better understanding of the severe competition and need for online brand presence in Australia. However, this also presents an opportunity for Farmers Trading Company, as it has not yet implemented internet sales and communication channels. Using brand marketing and social media, the department store company may entice Millenials to its brick-and-mortar locations, as this generation values creative communication platforms.

Consumer trends for department shops and other businesses in 2019 (National Australia Bank, 2019).

Consequently, one difficulty is the rising number of new entrants, a problem that Farmers Trading Company also faces. In light of this, brand marketing enables the communication of this department store chain's primary value to consumers and the establishment of an identity that differentiates this brand from its competitors (Shetty, Belavadi & Belavadi, 2019). Despite the possibility of internet buying, a strong brand can help Farmers Trading draw customers to its physical stores.

Conclusion

Farmers Trading Company has a long history of operations, but the current brand image does not serve as a commercial asset because the company is experiencing revenue loss. The establishment of a relationship with the customer constitutes brand marketing. This includes aspects like as communication, logo, marketing efforts, and other instruments that allow the value of the firm to be explained. The primary purpose of brand marketing is to communicate value to consumers via various communication and marketing channels. In this sense, a company's brand becomes an asset. Due to their association with a company's image, people attach great importance to the brand.

Recommendations

The basic function of department stores has not altered throughout the years; they continue to offer a variety of products in a single location. Farmers Trading Company's branding effort should emphasize the benefits of convenience and diversity. Farmers Trading Company can adopt some parts of brand marketing into its marketing plan, notably social media communication and crisis management, based on the results of this report.

Farmers Trading Company should regard brand marketing as a technique that will assist in familiarizing consumers with the organization's products. This can be a useful and effective strategy for increasing consumer demand (Natarelli & Plapler, 2017; Edeling & Fischer, 2016; Fornell, Morgeson & Hult, 2016). To ensure the efficient operation of this instrument, the organization must identify the distinguishing characteristics that set it apart from the competition. This is crucial, as Farmers Trading Company faces rising competition from both online and offline newcomers. Since the company's founding in 1909, Farmers Trading Company has a well-established brand. Despite the fact that the organization does not explicitly handle brand marketing, its operations, services, and reputation have helped consumers build a distinct impression of the department store chain (Ballantine & Ozanne, 2019). Farmers Trading Company can exploit the brand's lengthy history, which can be connected with quality and superior service, in its advertising campaign.

Farmers Trading Company can instantly begin evaluating its existing brand image from the consumer's perspective. As noted in the second section of this study, the organization has built a distinct brand despite the fact that it did not devote resources to addressing this marketing tool. Currently, it is crucial to assess the product and highlight the aspects that buyers value most. Short-term objectives include addressing the important positive components of the brand's image that consumers already connect with Farmer's Trading Company. This should be accomplished by emphasizing the qualities that buyers already acknowledge.

Long-term, Farmers Trading Company should concentrate on implementing its brand management plan across all of its 59 outlets and consider reconsidering its distribution strategy in light of Millennials' demand. This population values internet accessibility and ease, and an online business may accommodate these desires. Furthermore, Farmer's Trading Company must have a social media presence in order to draw this demographic to its physical locations. As a response to crises such as bad media representation or product defects, the company should develop a strategy for interacting with its customers. This will aid in preparing for unfavorable situations and preserving the company's reputation, since the staff responsible for branding will engage with consumers and handle any problems. Such a strategy will aid in establishing Farmers Trading Company as a responsible organization.

The aforementioned proposals take into account Farmers Trading Company's particulars, such as the time, resources, and budget required to accomplish each of the initiatives. The majority of the proposals, with the exception of the online store, may be implemented by existing marketing department staff. The proposals contain immediate, short-term, and long-term solutions, which facilitates forward planning.

References

P. Arbouw, P. W. Ballantine, and L. K. Ozanne (2019). An analysis of ad–brand inconsistency as it pertains to the maintenance of a positive brand image. Marketing Intelligence & Planning, 1, 1-10. Web.

Bailey, M. (2016). Marketing to the Large Middle: developing inexpensive department stores in Australia. Journal of Historical Marketing Research, 8(3), pp. 416–433. Web.

F. Barnes and D. M. Higgins (2020). Brand image, cultural association, and marketing: "New Zealand" butter and lamb exports to the United Kingdom, about 1920–1938. Business History, 62(1), pages 70 to 97 Web.

Capelli, P. & Tavis, A. (2016). The breakthrough in performance management. Harvard Business Review, 94(10), 58-67.

Chen, C. M., Nguyen, B. & Melewar, T.C. (2016). A management inquiry of the uses of company reputation in the Taiwanese pharmaceutical business. Qualitative Market Research, 19, 357-376, in 19(3).

Edeling, A., & Fischer, M. (2016). Generalizations based on a meta-analysis of the impact of marketing on business value 53 (4) Journal of Marketing Research: 515–534.

Fornell, C., Morgeson, F. & Hult, G. (2016). Customer satisfaction returns outperform the market. Journal of Marketing, eighty-five (5), 92–107.

P. Foroudi, S. Gupta, P. Kitchen, M.M. Foroudi, and B. Nguyen (2016). A structure encompassing place branding, place image, and place reputation. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, Volume 9, Number 2, Pages 241 to 264.

Gil, C. (2020). Humanizing your brand in the age of social media and AI marks the end of marketing. Kogan Page Limited in New York, New York

Hanssens, D. M. & Pauwels, K. H. (2016). Providing evidence of the value of marketing. Marketing Journal, 80(6), 173-190.

Hanssens D.M. (2020). AI, marketing science, and long-term profit expansion. The future of management in an AI environment, edited by J. Canals and F. Heukamp (pp. 40-68). Palgrave Macmillan, of London, United Kingdom, is the publisher.

Hewett, K., & Lemon, L. L. (2019). A process-oriented perspective on the function of integrated marketing communications during brand crises. International Journal of Qualitative Market Research, 2000-2000. Web.

Hollenbeck, B. (2018). Online reputation algorithms and the decline of chain affiliation's worth. 636–654 Journal of Marketing Research, 55(5)

Hsu, L., & Lawrence, B. (2016). The role of social media and brand equity during a product recall situation, from the perspective of shareholder value International Journal of Marketing Research, 3(1), pp. 59-77.

Luxton, S., Reid, M., & Mavondo, F. (2017). IMC capability: Brand performance antecedents and implications. European Marketing Journal, 51(3), 421-444.

Natarelli, M. & Plapler, R. (2017). Brand intimacy: a new marketing paradigm New York: Hatherleigh Press, Hobart

Australia's National Bank (2019). January 2019 NAB online retail sales index. Web.

Orazi, D.C., Spry, A., Theilacker, M.N., & Vredenburg, J. (2017). A framework for multi-stakeholder IMC for networked brand identity. European Marketing Journal, 51(3), 551-571.

Pace, S., Balboni, B., & Gistri, G. (2017). Evidence from the Barilla case on the effects of social media on brand attitude and WOM during a brand crisis. 23(2), 135-148, Journal of Marketing Communications.

Porcu, L., Del Barrio-García, L. & Kitchen, P.J. (2017). Measurement of integrated marketing communication using a comprehensive organizational approach: The IMC firm-wide scale. 692-718 European Journal of Marketing, 51(3)

The author D.E. (2015). Managing brands in a hostile digital environment. 55(3) Journal of Advertising Research: 237-241 Web.

Shetty, A. S., Venkataramaiah, N. B. & Kerena, C. (2019). Brand activism and millennials: An empirical examination of millennials' perceptions of brand activism. 17(4), 161-175 in Problems and Perspectives in Management. Web.

Shin, H., R. Casidy, A. Yoon, and S.H. Yoon (2016). A quasi-experiment on the effect of franchisor comments on brand trust and avoidance following a brand crisis. 1-24. Journal of Brand Management, 23(5).

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The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company: Process Of Change In An Organization Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Change Identification Using Theories and Theoretical Concepts Conclusion of Discussion References

Introduction

Managing change is essential for ensuring that an organization's structures and systems are continuously enhanced. The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, also known as ADNOC, is among the largest companies in the United Arab Emirates (Mallakh, 2015). The company's headquarters are located in Abu Dhabi, and it has approximately 55,000 workers working in several areas. HH Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed is the chairman of the board of directors, while Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber is the director-general and chief executive officer of the organization (Axon & Hewitt, 2019). Since its founding in 1971, the business has become the dominating player in the oil and gas industry of the United Arab Emirates.

ADNOC is the country's largest exporter of petroleum products. The management of this organization has been keen on hiring both locals and expats to ensure that it has a pool of exceptionally brilliant people that will enable it to compete competitively on the international market. Throughout the past several years, the organization has dealt with a variety of difficulties connected to the well-being of its personnel. Mallakh (2015) explains that one of the problems that have arisen at this organization is the limited emergency leave and the number of hours that an employee can be absent from work.

These concerns affect staff morale and productivity, thus they must be resolved. The goal of this article is to study a change process in which this organization is anticipated to implement additional emergency leave for its employees.

Identification of the Modification

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company is one of the top employers in the United Arab Emirates in terms of the compensation packages it offers its employees. According to Gibbons (2015), the company's competitive compensation has attracted some of the most skilled professionals in the worldwide oil and gas business. The plan is intended to ensure that this organization can maintain a pool of innovative and skilled employees who can reimagine the company's operations. Although the global market for the company's products has been rising, competition is also intensifying, and it is essential for a business to adopt the industry's best practices.

Voehl and Harrington (2016) argue that a company's operational strategies are contingent upon the capacity and capability of its employees. As a result, employing highly competent employees is only one stage in enhancing a company's efficiency. Equally crucial is ensuring that they are kept and remain motivated when employed by the company. Attractive compensation alone is insufficient to retain employees and maintain their motivation. According to Have, Have, Huijsmans, and Otto (2017), employees should feel respected.

Current ADNOC employees have stated that authorization hours and emergency leave are severely restricted. They find it difficult to solve personal emergencies due to the company's need that they be there at all times. Obtaining authorisation from the department of human resources during an emergency requires long procedures. In some instances, one would be expected to surrender their holidays if they are absent from work for multiple days due to a personal emergency.

The issue has caused alarm among the majority of the company's employees. They believe that management is indifferent to their well-being. Holloway (2014) cautions that it is crucial for management to avoid situations in which staff feel like robots. When management creates an environment in which the personal concerns of employees are not a priority, productivity will decrease. An individual with a troubled mind is incapable of achieving peak performance. In fact, their bad performance may have a direct impact on the department's overall performance.

This organization's management must accept change. The majority of employees believe a new system should be implemented that would allow them to take a 5-day emergency leave per year, according to the investigation. When there is a valid basis for their absence from work, the permissible hours should also be extended. This technique aims to ensure that employees are in their optimal mental state whenever they are at work. They must be at ease and prepared to deliver their finest performance.

According to Gibbons (2015), one of the most prevalent errors made by managers is believing that the mere presence of an employee at the workstation is sufficient. In a company with delicate operations, such as ADNOC, an absent employee might pose a significant threat to themselves, other employees, and the company's infrastructure. The suggested adjustment is intended not only to foster an environment conducive to employee success, but also to improve their performance by boosting their morale. This company's management should understand that the primary goal of implementing this change is to make employees feel comfortable, appreciated, and valued. It will lessen the risk of the company's top performers leaving for regional competitors.

Implementing Theories and Theoretical Ideas

When introducing change into a new organization, Holloway (2014) emphasizes that it is essential to recognize that certain individuals may feel uneasy. People frequently fear that their skills and competences may become obsolete under the new system. Others may believe that, under the new system, they will be expected to produce more, and as a result, they will need to spend more time at work and enhance their talents.

Management is frequently averse to a new system that requires the expenditure of additional resources because this would lower the company's profitability. Change is unavoidable, and it is essential for a company to discover the most effective means of coping with it, despite the varied worries of various stakeholders. According to Gibbons (2015), utilizing various theories and theoretical models can aid in explaining the significance of change and introducing smooth methods for implementing change inside an organization.

When bringing change inside an organization, the organizational development model of change outlined below outlines key considerations. The facilitated method is a means of introducing change. In this situation, management would identify areas that require redefinition and then implement what Voehl and Harrington (2016) refer to as top-down planned change. It requires minimal consultation. Junior employees would be notified of the senior management's decision and of what is expected of them. When dealing with emergencies where there is limited time to consult various stakeholders, the technique is beneficial.

The alternative technique is shared change ownership. In this instance, management will prioritize the human element of transformation. The new system should directly benefit all employees, managers, shareholders, and other concerned parties. Humanitarian is the suggested change of introducing more emergency leave days. It focuses on ensuring that people may attend work when they are mentally and physically well. The move will increase their overall performance, which will benefit the company's managers and stockholders. Customers will also be pleased if they are served by staff that are enthusiastic and dedicated to meeting their demands.

When initiating change, management should also not overlook the importance of continuous learning. Currently, the company's priority would be to implement more workdays. However, this does not imply that the company will be rigid as new best practices arise. Some organizations even permit their staff to work from home if they can provide the highest quality of services (Have et al., 2017). The administration should stay adaptable and willing to adopt new procedures. As outlined in the approach, humanistic principles must not be disregarded. After change is implemented, the entire system should work according to the firm's humanistic ideals and principles. The organization should avoid short-term gratification that could have severe long-term repercussions.

Figure 1: Organisational development change model (Myers, Hulks, & Wiggins, 2012, p. 54).

Lean six sigma is a common tool used by businesses to implement change efficiently and with minimal pushback from various stakeholders. The Six Sigma model highlights five steps that must be taken to ensure the successful introduction of a new system. The initial phase is defining the procedure and the issue. It is crucial that all stakeholders comprehend why it is important to abandon one practice and adopt another at this time.

The problem at ADNOC has been recognized as the limited leave time and emergency hours available to staff throughout the year. As some are frequently required to report to work despite being ill, the majority of them believe that the lack of emergency leave negatively impacts their morale. The second stage is to assess the existing performance (Have et al., 2017). The management would need to conduct an evaluation to ascertain the degree of employee morale and how it influences their performance inside the organization. The primary objective of assessing performance at this stage is to assist management in comparing the efficacy of the workforce before to and after the implementation of change.

The third phase consists of analyzing the process for problems and root causes (Gibbons, 2015). Management will investigate the nature of current practices, corporate rules, and guiding concepts that determine their existence, as well as the reasons why employees believe they should be altered. The managers should evaluate why the company does not offer emergency leave to its employees and how this impacts the company's overall performance. Determine and implement improvement initiatives constitute the fourth stage (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). At this point, the organization will bring change.

The management must comprehend the limitations of the current system and the necessity of implementing the new system to address recognized concerns. The final step is to sustain the enhanced process (Have et al., 2017). Once a new system is implemented, the management will need to implement new policies to safeguard their existence. The new policy should describe the benefits of emergency leave days and how it helps various stakeholders. The management may also be interested in conducting a second poll to assess employee performance after implementing the new system and determining its benefits. Figure 1 illustrates the procedures that should be done when implementing this model within an organization.

Figure 2. Lean six sigma (Myers et al., 2012, p. 76).

Kurt Lewin's change model, depicted in Figure 3, is one of the most widely used theoretical models for implementing change in organizations. Gibbons (2015) argues that the approach has been demonstrated to be effective, particularly when implementing a new system that may not be well-liked by a substantial portion of the workforce. In this methodical approach to introducing change, the initial stage is defrosting. It is intended to ensure employees and other stakeholders are prepared for change (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). Those responsible for initiating change are expected to begin by discussing the ineffectiveness of the current system and the advantages of the new one.

At this stage, addressing the anxieties and concerns of the employees is one of the most crucial duties that must be performed. Some of them may be concerned about losing their jobs. Others may be apprehensive about the new responsibilities they must assume, while other managers may be anxious about the expense. When adopting emergency leave days, the added expense would be the primary concern. The management may believe that it would necessitate the hiring of additional personnel in order to implement five annual emergency leave days for employees. The team responsible for implementing this new procedure should explain to management how the change would increase employee productivity.

The second step of this paradigm is the change process itself. According to Holloway (2014), one would be required to implement the anticipated adjustment depending on the preparations made. On the basis of the preparations they have undergone during the initial phase, it is assumed that all stakeholders will be prepared to adopt the new system at this point. It is essential to ensure that the new system lives up to its former promises.

In this instance, the corporation will implement a new policy that includes authorization hours and five days of emergency leave per year. This model's final phase, refreeze, requires management to ensure that the change is made permanent (Have et al., 2017). The new procedure should be included into the organization's policies and procedures. Everyone should be made aware of why the practice was implemented by management.

The board of directors of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company may be concerned about the cost implications of the new system. The management should stay transparent and explain that, despite the possibility of a rise in costs, the overall effect of the new practice offers benefits that surpass the costs. The improved morale of the workforce would result in enhanced performance, which would have a beneficial effect on the company's profitability.

Figure 3. Kurt Lewin's change model (Myers et al., 2012, p. 41).

Discussion

When implementing change within a business, productivity enhancement is frequently the primary objective. The management of ADNOC has done an excellent job of implementing attractive compensations for its employees. However, a new problem has developed in which a substantial proportion of these employees believe that the corporation has failed to account for the requirement for emergency leave days. According to Holloway (2014), the mental and physical strength of an employee determines their effectiveness within a company. When an employee is ill or psychologically preoccupied due to a personal emergency, they are unable to function adequately as expected.

In reality, they are likely to make errors that could have disastrous effects for the organization. As a result, numerous organizations have recently implemented new rules designed to improve employee well-being. According to Voehl and Harrington (2016), a number of large multinational firms have implemented counseling departments within the human resources department where psychologists and other mental health specialists can assist employees in overcoming emotional obstacles. Others have instituted additional holidays to guarantee that their employees remain engaged and committed.

The choice to implement additional authorization hours and five emergency leave days will have a substantial effect on this organization. It will eliminate errors made by employees who report to work when ill or emotionally disturbed. It will serve as a reminder to all ADNOC employees that management is committed to serving their best interests. According to Holloway (2014), such non-financial incentives frequently provide substantial benefits to employees. It gives them a sense of respect. Their performance will be directly affected by their morale. The production of an organization is contingent on the individual performance of its employees.

When these employees' minds are at ease, they will be able to produce the finest results in their particular roles. The loss of its well-trained and experienced staff to its regional competitors in the oil and gas business is a serious issue for ADNOC's management. When a person is subjected to tremendous work pressure, they may feel mistreated by the organization. As a result, they may readily consider leaving the company for another where they believe their interests will be protected. Training a worker over a set period requires both time and money. The loss of a talented employee may have a significant impact on the company. Adopting this new strategy will aid in preventing such high staff turnover rates.

Conclusion

Change is inevitable in any business, but how it is implemented matters greatly. As demonstrated in the preceding section, although change is inevitable, many individuals tend to fear it for many reasons. As a result, it would be typical for different stakeholders to oppose it out of personal concerns. Even though ADNOC has one of the greatest compensation packages for its employees, the absence of emergency leave days is a major problem, according to the report. Employees are sometimes compelled to report to work while they are ill or experiencing severe emotional distress.

The suggested modification is for the HR department to institute five days of emergency leave each year. The plan would ensure that employees only report to work when they are physically and psychologically fit to do their assigned tasks. The new approach will boost employee morale and the company's overall success. It will also lessen the likelihood that talented employees of this company will leave for other companies out of frustration.

References

Axon, A., and S. Hewitt (Eds). (2019). 1975/76 until 2018 for the United Arab Emirates. Boston, Massachusetts: Brill.

Gibbons, Philip (2015). The science of effective organizational change: how leaders develop strategy, alter behavior, and foster an adaptable culture. Pearson Education, Melbourne, Australia

Have, S., Have, W., Huijsmans, A., & Otto, M. (2017). Applying evidence-based insights to change management practice while reevaluating change management. Routledge, New York, NY

G. Holloway (2014). Change management: new terminology for old concepts. Xlibris Corporation, Bloomington, IN

Mallakh, R. (2015). The economic growth of the United Arab Emirates: RLE Middle Eastern economy (2nd ed.). Routledge, New York, NY

Myers, P., S. Hulks, and L. Wiggins (2012). Changes in Organizational Structures Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press

Voehl, F., & Harrington, J. H. (2016). Change management: If you don't manage change, it will manage you. CRC Press is based in New York.

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The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company: Process Of Change In An Organization Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Change Identification Using Theories and Theoretical Concepts Conclusion of Discussion References

Introduction

Managing change is essential for ensuring that an organization's structures and systems are continuously enhanced. The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, also known as ADNOC, is among the largest companies in the United Arab Emirates (Mallakh, 2015). The company's headquarters are located in Abu Dhabi, and it has approximately 55,000 workers working in several areas. HH Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed is the chairman of the board of directors, while Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber is the director-general and chief executive officer of the organization (Axon & Hewitt, 2019). Since its founding in 1971, the business has become the dominating player in the oil and gas industry of the United Arab Emirates.

ADNOC is the country's largest exporter of petroleum products. The management of this organization has been keen on hiring both locals and expats to ensure that it has a pool of exceptionally brilliant people that will enable it to compete competitively on the international market. Throughout the past several years, the organization has dealt with a variety of difficulties connected to the well-being of its personnel. Mallakh (2015) explains that one of the problems that have arisen at this organization is the limited emergency leave and the number of hours that an employee can be absent from work.

These concerns affect staff morale and productivity, thus they must be resolved. The goal of this article is to study a change process in which this organization is anticipated to implement additional emergency leave for its employees.

Identification of the Modification

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company is one of the top employers in the United Arab Emirates in terms of the compensation packages it offers its employees. According to Gibbons (2015), the company's competitive compensation has attracted some of the most skilled professionals in the worldwide oil and gas business. The plan is intended to ensure that this organization can maintain a pool of innovative and skilled employees who can reimagine the company's operations. Although the global market for the company's products has been rising, competition is also intensifying, and it is essential for a business to adopt the industry's best practices.

Voehl and Harrington (2016) argue that a company's operational strategies are contingent upon the capacity and capability of its employees. As a result, employing highly competent employees is only one stage in enhancing a company's efficiency. Equally crucial is ensuring that they are kept and remain motivated when employed by the company. Attractive compensation alone is insufficient to retain employees and maintain their motivation. According to Have, Have, Huijsmans, and Otto (2017), employees should feel respected.

Current ADNOC employees have stated that authorization hours and emergency leave are severely restricted. They find it difficult to solve personal emergencies due to the company's need that they be there at all times. Obtaining authorisation from the department of human resources during an emergency requires long procedures. In some instances, one would be expected to surrender their holidays if they are absent from work for multiple days due to a personal emergency.

The issue has caused alarm among the majority of the company's employees. They believe that management is indifferent to their well-being. Holloway (2014) cautions that it is crucial for management to avoid situations in which staff feel like robots. When management creates an environment in which the personal concerns of employees are not a priority, productivity will decrease. An individual with a troubled mind is incapable of achieving peak performance. In fact, their bad performance may have a direct impact on the department's overall performance.

This organization's management must accept change. The majority of employees believe a new system should be implemented that would allow them to take a 5-day emergency leave per year, according to the investigation. When there is a valid basis for their absence from work, the permissible hours should also be extended. This technique aims to ensure that employees are in their optimal mental state whenever they are at work. They must be at ease and prepared to deliver their finest performance.

According to Gibbons (2015), one of the most prevalent errors made by managers is believing that the mere presence of an employee at the workstation is sufficient. In a company with delicate operations, such as ADNOC, an absent employee might pose a significant threat to themselves, other employees, and the company's infrastructure. The suggested adjustment is intended not only to foster an environment conducive to employee success, but also to improve their performance by boosting their morale. This company's management should understand that the primary goal of implementing this change is to make employees feel comfortable, appreciated, and valued. It will lessen the risk of the company's top performers leaving for regional competitors.

Implementing Theories and Theoretical Ideas

When introducing change into a new organization, Holloway (2014) emphasizes that it is essential to recognize that certain individuals may feel uneasy. People frequently fear that their skills and competences may become obsolete under the new system. Others may believe that, under the new system, they will be expected to produce more, and as a result, they will need to spend more time at work and enhance their talents.

Management is frequently averse to a new system that requires the expenditure of additional resources because this would lower the company's profitability. Change is unavoidable, and it is essential for a company to discover the most effective means of coping with it, despite the varied worries of various stakeholders. According to Gibbons (2015), utilizing various theories and theoretical models can aid in explaining the significance of change and introducing smooth methods for implementing change inside an organization.

When bringing change inside an organization, the organizational development model of change outlined below outlines key considerations. The facilitated method is a means of introducing change. In this situation, management would identify areas that require redefinition and then implement what Voehl and Harrington (2016) refer to as top-down planned change. It requires minimal consultation. Junior employees would be notified of the senior management's decision and of what is expected of them. When dealing with emergencies where there is limited time to consult various stakeholders, the technique is beneficial.

The alternative technique is shared change ownership. In this instance, management will prioritize the human element of transformation. The new system should directly benefit all employees, managers, shareholders, and other concerned parties. Humanitarian is the suggested change of introducing more emergency leave days. It focuses on ensuring that people may attend work when they are mentally and physically well. The move will increase their overall performance, which will benefit the company's managers and stockholders. Customers will also be pleased if they are served by staff that are enthusiastic and dedicated to meeting their demands.

When initiating change, management should also not overlook the importance of continuous learning. Currently, the company's priority would be to implement more workdays. However, this does not imply that the company will be rigid as new best practices arise. Some organizations even permit their staff to work from home if they can provide the highest quality of services (Have et al., 2017). The administration should stay adaptable and willing to adopt new procedures. As outlined in the approach, humanistic principles must not be disregarded. After change is implemented, the entire system should work according to the firm's humanistic ideals and principles. The organization should avoid short-term gratification that could have severe long-term repercussions.

Figure 1: Organisational development change model (Myers, Hulks, & Wiggins, 2012, p. 54).

Lean six sigma is a common tool used by businesses to implement change efficiently and with minimal pushback from various stakeholders. The Six Sigma model highlights five steps that must be taken to ensure the successful introduction of a new system. The initial phase is defining the procedure and the issue. It is crucial that all stakeholders comprehend why it is important to abandon one practice and adopt another at this time.

The problem at ADNOC has been recognized as the limited leave time and emergency hours available to staff throughout the year. As some are frequently required to report to work despite being ill, the majority of them believe that the lack of emergency leave negatively impacts their morale. The second stage is to assess the existing performance (Have et al., 2017). The management would need to conduct an evaluation to ascertain the degree of employee morale and how it influences their performance inside the organization. The primary objective of assessing performance at this stage is to assist management in comparing the efficacy of the workforce before to and after the implementation of change.

The third phase consists of analyzing the process for problems and root causes (Gibbons, 2015). Management will investigate the nature of current practices, corporate rules, and guiding concepts that determine their existence, as well as the reasons why employees believe they should be altered. The managers should evaluate why the company does not offer emergency leave to its employees and how this impacts the company's overall performance. Determine and implement improvement initiatives constitute the fourth stage (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). At this point, the organization will bring change.

The management must comprehend the limitations of the current system and the necessity of implementing the new system to address recognized concerns. The final step is to sustain the enhanced process (Have et al., 2017). Once a new system is implemented, the management will need to implement new policies to safeguard their existence. The new policy should describe the benefits of emergency leave days and how it helps various stakeholders. The management may also be interested in conducting a second poll to assess employee performance after implementing the new system and determining its benefits. Figure 1 illustrates the procedures that should be done when implementing this model within an organization.

Figure 2. Lean six sigma (Myers et al., 2012, p. 76).

Kurt Lewin's change model, depicted in Figure 3, is one of the most widely used theoretical models for implementing change in organizations. Gibbons (2015) argues that the approach has been demonstrated to be effective, particularly when implementing a new system that may not be well-liked by a substantial portion of the workforce. In this methodical approach to introducing change, the initial stage is defrosting. It is intended to ensure employees and other stakeholders are prepared for change (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). Those responsible for initiating change are expected to begin by discussing the ineffectiveness of the current system and the advantages of the new one.

At this stage, addressing the anxieties and concerns of the employees is one of the most crucial duties that must be performed. Some of them may be concerned about losing their jobs. Others may be apprehensive about the new responsibilities they must assume, while other managers may be anxious about the expense. When adopting emergency leave days, the added expense would be the primary concern. The management may believe that it would necessitate the hiring of additional personnel in order to implement five annual emergency leave days for employees. The team responsible for implementing this new procedure should explain to management how the change would increase employee productivity.

The second step of this paradigm is the change process itself. According to Holloway (2014), one would be required to implement the anticipated adjustment depending on the preparations made. On the basis of the preparations they have undergone during the initial phase, it is assumed that all stakeholders will be prepared to adopt the new system at this point. It is essential to ensure that the new system lives up to its former promises.

In this instance, the corporation will implement a new policy that includes authorization hours and five days of emergency leave per year. This model's final phase, refreeze, requires management to ensure that the change is made permanent (Have et al., 2017). The new procedure should be included into the organization's policies and procedures. Everyone should be made aware of why the practice was implemented by management.

The board of directors of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company may be concerned about the cost implications of the new system. The management should stay transparent and explain that, despite the possibility of a rise in costs, the overall effect of the new practice offers benefits that surpass the costs. The improved morale of the workforce would result in enhanced performance, which would have a beneficial effect on the company's profitability.

Figure 3. Kurt Lewin's change model (Myers et al., 2012, p. 41).

Discussion

When implementing change within a business, productivity enhancement is frequently the primary objective. The management of ADNOC has done an excellent job of implementing attractive compensations for its employees. However, a new problem has developed in which a substantial proportion of these employees believe that the corporation has failed to account for the requirement for emergency leave days. According to Holloway (2014), the mental and physical strength of an employee determines their effectiveness within a company. When an employee is ill or psychologically preoccupied due to a personal emergency, they are unable to function adequately as expected.

In reality, they are likely to make errors that could have disastrous effects for the organization. As a result, numerous organizations have recently implemented new rules designed to improve employee well-being. According to Voehl and Harrington (2016), a number of large multinational firms have implemented counseling departments within the human resources department where psychologists and other mental health specialists can assist employees in overcoming emotional obstacles. Others have instituted additional holidays to guarantee that their employees remain engaged and committed.

The choice to implement additional authorization hours and five emergency leave days will have a substantial effect on this organization. It will eliminate errors made by employees who report to work when ill or emotionally disturbed. It will serve as a reminder to all ADNOC employees that management is committed to serving their best interests. According to Holloway (2014), such non-financial incentives frequently provide substantial benefits to employees. It gives them a sense of respect. Their performance will be directly affected by their morale. The production of an organization is contingent on the individual performance of its employees.

When these employees' minds are at ease, they will be able to produce the finest results in their particular roles. The loss of its well-trained and experienced staff to its regional competitors in the oil and gas business is a serious issue for ADNOC's management. When a person is subjected to tremendous work pressure, they may feel mistreated by the organization. As a result, they may readily consider leaving the company for another where they believe their interests will be protected. Training a worker over a set period requires both time and money. The loss of a talented employee may have a significant impact on the company. Adopting this new strategy will aid in preventing such high staff turnover rates.

Conclusion

Change is inevitable in any business, but how it is implemented matters greatly. As demonstrated in the preceding section, although change is inevitable, many individuals tend to fear it for many reasons. As a result, it would be typical for different stakeholders to oppose it out of personal concerns. Even though ADNOC has one of the greatest compensation packages for its employees, the absence of emergency leave days is a major problem, according to the report. Employees are sometimes compelled to report to work while they are ill or experiencing severe emotional distress.

The suggested modification is for the HR department to institute five days of emergency leave each year. The plan would ensure that employees only report to work when they are physically and psychologically fit to do their assigned tasks. The new approach will boost employee morale and the company's overall success. It will also lessen the likelihood that talented employees of this company will leave for other companies out of frustration.

References

Axon, A., and S. Hewitt (Eds). (2019). 1975/76 until 2018 for the United Arab Emirates. Boston, Massachusetts: Brill.

Gibbons, Philip (2015). The science of effective organizational change: how leaders develop strategy, alter behavior, and foster an adaptable culture. Pearson Education, Melbourne, Australia

Have, S., Have, W., Huijsmans, A., & Otto, M. (2017). Applying evidence-based insights to change management practice while reevaluating change management. Routledge, New York, NY

G. Holloway (2014). Change management: new terminology for old concepts. Xlibris Corporation, Bloomington, IN

Mallakh, R. (2015). The economic growth of the United Arab Emirates: RLE Middle Eastern economy (2nd ed.). Routledge, New York, NY

Myers, P., S. Hulks, and L. Wiggins (2012). Changes in Organizational Structures Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press

Voehl, F., & Harrington, J. H. (2016). Change management: If you don't manage change, it will manage you. CRC Press is based in New York.

[supanova question]

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company: Process Of Change In An Organization Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Change Identification Using Theories and Theoretical Concepts Conclusion of Discussion References

Introduction

Managing change is essential for ensuring that an organization's structures and systems are continuously enhanced. The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, also known as ADNOC, is among the largest companies in the United Arab Emirates (Mallakh, 2015). The company's headquarters are located in Abu Dhabi, and it has approximately 55,000 workers working in several areas. HH Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed is the chairman of the board of directors, while Sultan Ahmed Al Jaber is the director-general and chief executive officer of the organization (Axon & Hewitt, 2019). Since its founding in 1971, the business has become the dominating player in the oil and gas industry of the United Arab Emirates.

ADNOC is the country's largest exporter of petroleum products. The management of this organization has been keen on hiring both locals and expats to ensure that it has a pool of exceptionally brilliant people that will enable it to compete competitively on the international market. Throughout the past several years, the organization has dealt with a variety of difficulties connected to the well-being of its personnel. Mallakh (2015) explains that one of the problems that have arisen at this organization is the limited emergency leave and the number of hours that an employee can be absent from work.

These concerns affect staff morale and productivity, thus they must be resolved. The goal of this article is to study a change process in which this organization is anticipated to implement additional emergency leave for its employees.

Identification of the Modification

The Abu Dhabi National Oil Company is one of the top employers in the United Arab Emirates in terms of the compensation packages it offers its employees. According to Gibbons (2015), the company's competitive compensation has attracted some of the most skilled professionals in the worldwide oil and gas business. The plan is intended to ensure that this organization can maintain a pool of innovative and skilled employees who can reimagine the company's operations. Although the global market for the company's products has been rising, competition is also intensifying, and it is essential for a business to adopt the industry's best practices.

Voehl and Harrington (2016) argue that a company's operational strategies are contingent upon the capacity and capability of its employees. As a result, employing highly competent employees is only one stage in enhancing a company's efficiency. Equally crucial is ensuring that they are kept and remain motivated when employed by the company. Attractive compensation alone is insufficient to retain employees and maintain their motivation. According to Have, Have, Huijsmans, and Otto (2017), employees should feel respected.

Current ADNOC employees have stated that authorization hours and emergency leave are severely restricted. They find it difficult to solve personal emergencies due to the company's need that they be there at all times. Obtaining authorisation from the department of human resources during an emergency requires long procedures. In some instances, one would be expected to surrender their holidays if they are absent from work for multiple days due to a personal emergency.

The issue has caused alarm among the majority of the company's employees. They believe that management is indifferent to their well-being. Holloway (2014) cautions that it is crucial for management to avoid situations in which staff feel like robots. When management creates an environment in which the personal concerns of employees are not a priority, productivity will decrease. An individual with a troubled mind is incapable of achieving peak performance. In fact, their bad performance may have a direct impact on the department's overall performance.

This organization's management must accept change. The majority of employees believe a new system should be implemented that would allow them to take a 5-day emergency leave per year, according to the investigation. When there is a valid basis for their absence from work, the permissible hours should also be extended. This technique aims to ensure that employees are in their optimal mental state whenever they are at work. They must be at ease and prepared to deliver their finest performance.

According to Gibbons (2015), one of the most prevalent errors made by managers is believing that the mere presence of an employee at the workstation is sufficient. In a company with delicate operations, such as ADNOC, an absent employee might pose a significant threat to themselves, other employees, and the company's infrastructure. The suggested adjustment is intended not only to foster an environment conducive to employee success, but also to improve their performance by boosting their morale. This company's management should understand that the primary goal of implementing this change is to make employees feel comfortable, appreciated, and valued. It will lessen the risk of the company's top performers leaving for regional competitors.

Implementing Theories and Theoretical Ideas

When introducing change into a new organization, Holloway (2014) emphasizes that it is essential to recognize that certain individuals may feel uneasy. People frequently fear that their skills and competences may become obsolete under the new system. Others may believe that, under the new system, they will be expected to produce more, and as a result, they will need to spend more time at work and enhance their talents.

Management is frequently averse to a new system that requires the expenditure of additional resources because this would lower the company's profitability. Change is unavoidable, and it is essential for a company to discover the most effective means of coping with it, despite the varied worries of various stakeholders. According to Gibbons (2015), utilizing various theories and theoretical models can aid in explaining the significance of change and introducing smooth methods for implementing change inside an organization.

When bringing change inside an organization, the organizational development model of change outlined below outlines key considerations. The facilitated method is a means of introducing change. In this situation, management would identify areas that require redefinition and then implement what Voehl and Harrington (2016) refer to as top-down planned change. It requires minimal consultation. Junior employees would be notified of the senior management's decision and of what is expected of them. When dealing with emergencies where there is limited time to consult various stakeholders, the technique is beneficial.

The alternative technique is shared change ownership. In this instance, management will prioritize the human element of transformation. The new system should directly benefit all employees, managers, shareholders, and other concerned parties. Humanitarian is the suggested change of introducing more emergency leave days. It focuses on ensuring that people may attend work when they are mentally and physically well. The move will increase their overall performance, which will benefit the company's managers and stockholders. Customers will also be pleased if they are served by staff that are enthusiastic and dedicated to meeting their demands.

When initiating change, management should also not overlook the importance of continuous learning. Currently, the company's priority would be to implement more workdays. However, this does not imply that the company will be rigid as new best practices arise. Some organizations even permit their staff to work from home if they can provide the highest quality of services (Have et al., 2017). The administration should stay adaptable and willing to adopt new procedures. As outlined in the approach, humanistic principles must not be disregarded. After change is implemented, the entire system should work according to the firm's humanistic ideals and principles. The organization should avoid short-term gratification that could have severe long-term repercussions.

Figure 1: Organisational development change model (Myers, Hulks, & Wiggins, 2012, p. 54).

Lean six sigma is a common tool used by businesses to implement change efficiently and with minimal pushback from various stakeholders. The Six Sigma model highlights five steps that must be taken to ensure the successful introduction of a new system. The initial phase is defining the procedure and the issue. It is crucial that all stakeholders comprehend why it is important to abandon one practice and adopt another at this time.

The problem at ADNOC has been recognized as the limited leave time and emergency hours available to staff throughout the year. As some are frequently required to report to work despite being ill, the majority of them believe that the lack of emergency leave negatively impacts their morale. The second stage is to assess the existing performance (Have et al., 2017). The management would need to conduct an evaluation to ascertain the degree of employee morale and how it influences their performance inside the organization. The primary objective of assessing performance at this stage is to assist management in comparing the efficacy of the workforce before to and after the implementation of change.

The third phase consists of analyzing the process for problems and root causes (Gibbons, 2015). Management will investigate the nature of current practices, corporate rules, and guiding concepts that determine their existence, as well as the reasons why employees believe they should be altered. The managers should evaluate why the company does not offer emergency leave to its employees and how this impacts the company's overall performance. Determine and implement improvement initiatives constitute the fourth stage (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). At this point, the organization will bring change.

The management must comprehend the limitations of the current system and the necessity of implementing the new system to address recognized concerns. The final step is to sustain the enhanced process (Have et al., 2017). Once a new system is implemented, the management will need to implement new policies to safeguard their existence. The new policy should describe the benefits of emergency leave days and how it helps various stakeholders. The management may also be interested in conducting a second poll to assess employee performance after implementing the new system and determining its benefits. Figure 1 illustrates the procedures that should be done when implementing this model within an organization.

Figure 2. Lean six sigma (Myers et al., 2012, p. 76).

Kurt Lewin's change model, depicted in Figure 3, is one of the most widely used theoretical models for implementing change in organizations. Gibbons (2015) argues that the approach has been demonstrated to be effective, particularly when implementing a new system that may not be well-liked by a substantial portion of the workforce. In this methodical approach to introducing change, the initial stage is defrosting. It is intended to ensure employees and other stakeholders are prepared for change (Voehl & Harrington, 2016). Those responsible for initiating change are expected to begin by discussing the ineffectiveness of the current system and the advantages of the new one.

At this stage, addressing the anxieties and concerns of the employees is one of the most crucial duties that must be performed. Some of them may be concerned about losing their jobs. Others may be apprehensive about the new responsibilities they must assume, while other managers may be anxious about the expense. When adopting emergency leave days, the added expense would be the primary concern. The management may believe that it would necessitate the hiring of additional personnel in order to implement five annual emergency leave days for employees. The team responsible for implementing this new procedure should explain to management how the change would increase employee productivity.

The second step of this paradigm is the change process itself. According to Holloway (2014), one would be required to implement the anticipated adjustment depending on the preparations made. On the basis of the preparations they have undergone during the initial phase, it is assumed that all stakeholders will be prepared to adopt the new system at this point. It is essential to ensure that the new system lives up to its former promises.

In this instance, the corporation will implement a new policy that includes authorization hours and five days of emergency leave per year. This model's final phase, refreeze, requires management to ensure that the change is made permanent (Have et al., 2017). The new procedure should be included into the organization's policies and procedures. Everyone should be made aware of why the practice was implemented by management.

The board of directors of Abu Dhabi National Oil Company may be concerned about the cost implications of the new system. The management should stay transparent and explain that, despite the possibility of a rise in costs, the overall effect of the new practice offers benefits that surpass the costs. The improved morale of the workforce would result in enhanced performance, which would have a beneficial effect on the company's profitability.

Figure 3. Kurt Lewin's change model (Myers et al., 2012, p. 41).

Discussion

When implementing change within a business, productivity enhancement is frequently the primary objective. The management of ADNOC has done an excellent job of implementing attractive compensations for its employees. However, a new problem has developed in which a substantial proportion of these employees believe that the corporation has failed to account for the requirement for emergency leave days. According to Holloway (2014), the mental and physical strength of an employee determines their effectiveness within a company. When an employee is ill or psychologically preoccupied due to a personal emergency, they are unable to function adequately as expected.

In reality, they are likely to make errors that could have disastrous effects for the organization. As a result, numerous organizations have recently implemented new rules designed to improve employee well-being. According to Voehl and Harrington (2016), a number of large multinational firms have implemented counseling departments within the human resources department where psychologists and other mental health specialists can assist employees in overcoming emotional obstacles. Others have instituted additional holidays to guarantee that their employees remain engaged and committed.

The choice to implement additional authorization hours and five emergency leave days will have a substantial effect on this organization. It will eliminate errors made by employees who report to work when ill or emotionally disturbed. It will serve as a reminder to all ADNOC employees that management is committed to serving their best interests. According to Holloway (2014), such non-financial incentives frequently provide substantial benefits to employees. It gives them a sense of respect. Their performance will be directly affected by their morale. The production of an organization is contingent on the individual performance of its employees.

When these employees' minds are at ease, they will be able to produce the finest results in their particular roles. The loss of its well-trained and experienced staff to its regional competitors in the oil and gas business is a serious issue for ADNOC's management. When a person is subjected to tremendous work pressure, they may feel mistreated by the organization. As a result, they may readily consider leaving the company for another where they believe their interests will be protected. Training a worker over a set period requires both time and money. The loss of a talented employee may have a significant impact on the company. Adopting this new strategy will aid in preventing such high staff turnover rates.

Conclusion

Change is inevitable in any business, but how it is implemented matters greatly. As demonstrated in the preceding section, although change is inevitable, many individuals tend to fear it for many reasons. As a result, it would be typical for different stakeholders to oppose it out of personal concerns. Even though ADNOC has one of the greatest compensation packages for its employees, the absence of emergency leave days is a major problem, according to the report. Employees are sometimes compelled to report to work while they are ill or experiencing severe emotional distress.

The suggested modification is for the HR department to institute five days of emergency leave each year. The plan would ensure that employees only report to work when they are physically and psychologically fit to do their assigned tasks. The new approach will boost employee morale and the company's overall success. It will also lessen the likelihood that talented employees of this company will leave for other companies out of frustration.

References

Axon, A., and S. Hewitt (Eds). (2019). 1975/76 until 2018 for the United Arab Emirates. Boston, Massachusetts: Brill.

Gibbons, Philip (2015). The science of effective organizational change: how leaders develop strategy, alter behavior, and foster an adaptable culture. Pearson Education, Melbourne, Australia

Have, S., Have, W., Huijsmans, A., & Otto, M. (2017). Applying evidence-based insights to change management practice while reevaluating change management. Routledge, New York, NY

G. Holloway (2014). Change management: new terminology for old concepts. Xlibris Corporation, Bloomington, IN

Mallakh, R. (2015). The economic growth of the United Arab Emirates: RLE Middle Eastern economy (2nd ed.). Routledge, New York, NY

Myers, P., S. Hulks, and L. Wiggins (2012). Changes in Organizational Structures Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press

Voehl, F., & Harrington, J. H. (2016). Change management: If you don't manage change, it will manage you. CRC Press is based in New York.

[supanova question]

Managing Organizational Changes In ADEK Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Applying Theories and Theoretical Concepts to Problem Definition and Change Identification Conclusion of Discussion References

Introduction

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge, or ADEK, is the educational body of Abu Dhabi. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan, president of the United Arab Emirates, founded ADEK in 2005 for the primary purpose of administering and managing public schools throughout the emirate (Goksoy, 2016). It also regulates and oversees private schools in the country to ensure that they adhere to the appropriate regional educational requirements.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, who is also the crown prince of the UAE, presently serves as the institution's chairman. ADEK has been focused on ensuring that the country's educational standards align with global best practices established by Europe, North America, East Asia, and other nations (Jabri, 2017). As a result, the management has been eager to provide frequent training to its personnel in order to equip them with new abilities. Prior to being entrusted with additional responsibilities, ADEK's human resources (HR) division requires new hires to complete regular training programs. The purpose of such trainings is to ensure that participants acquire the necessary practical skills for their respective fields.

The HR department of ADEK has been utilizing unstructured On-the-Job-Training (OJT) to increase the competence of new hires. However, the HR department's management observed that the trend is shifting and organized OJT is becoming more popular due to its efficacy. As a result, the institution decided to go from unstructured to structured OJT in order to increase productivity, save expenses, and ensure that the desired training objectives are met in the quickest time feasible. According to Kotter (2014), introducing change within an organization necessitates addressing multiple obstacles, such as opposition to new practices.

The goal of this article is to illustrate the transition from one training model to another inside this company. The study examined difficulties associated with such procedures, methods for overcoming such difficulties, models that this organization should consider using, and the advantages of the approach.

Definition of the Issue and Identification of Change

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge has been intent on strengthening its employees' ability to do a variety of tasks. Historically, the HR Department utilized unstructured on-the-job training. Unstructured OJT is defined by Pamel (2013) as "a training program in which a new employee works with an experienced employee or supervisor who serves as a mentor in an observe-and-imitate training process" (para. 3).

In this situation, the new employee is expected to gain practical skills by observing an experienced coworker. In the majority of instances, there is no question-and-answer session. It relies heavily on observation (Jabri, 2017). It was deemed effective in providing practical skills to the company's new hires. However, recent research clearly suggests that unstructured OJT is ineffective at enhancing the skills of new hires. It is unclear how such recruits should acquire knowledge in a methodical manner.

Due to the rarity of question-and-answer sessions, training recruits may take longer and be more expensive. Campbell (2014) contends that sabotage may be prevalent while utilizing unstructured OJT. Employees with expertise may intentionally mislead rookies in order to avoid passing on their knowledge. They may believe that expressing their experience will make them less valued to the company and, therefore, more susceptible.

The management discovered that it was taking its new workers a considerable amount of time to acquire the practical skills necessary to assume a variety of duties. Some of the errors that some of these employees were doing were costly to the company, making it difficult for the management to entrust them with crucial responsibilities without the oversight of seasoned staff. The HR department of ADEK recognized that the system required modification.

Structured OJT was regarded as the most effective approach of teaching new employees practical skills. Pamel (2013) describes structured OJT as "a program designed to teach new employees the skills necessary to complete a task successfully" (para. 4). The primary distinction between organized and unstructured OJT is the delivery method. While unstructured OJT expects individuals to learn through workplace observation, structured OJT is a learning program led by a trained individual. The trainer works with the new recruits, describing what should be done at a particular time and why. In On-the-Job-Training, the trainer employs a curriculum to describe the abilities that must be acquired within a given time frame (Goksoy, 2016).

Trainees are encouraged to ask questions if they have confusion about a topic. This systematic training, according to Kotter (2014), requires less time, is less expensive, and minimizes the number of errors made by employees while doing their regular activities. It is more efficient than the unstructured model for training newly hired personnel. Due to the benefits of the structured model, a number of large multinational organizations are replacing unstructured OJT with it. As a result, the administration of this institution saw that introducing the new model was the most effective means of overcoming obstacles encountered when using the traditional model.

The unstructured OJT had become a typical practice in the HR division of ADEK. The management did not need to recruit experts to assist with employee training. Instead, skilled employees were expected to work alongside those with less training. The introduction of the new model posed a challenge that management had to handle. According to Campbell (2014), the process of transformation in an organization is frequently marked by numerous obstacles.

Many stakeholders may attempt to resist change for various reasons. The management may reject change if it necessitates incurring new expenses that were not anticipated for in the current fiscal year. Changes of this magnitude frequently necessitate the reorganization of multiple systems inside the business. Some employees may resist change out of concern that new organizational procedures and structures will render their services obsolete. A company's shareholders may be concerned about the profitability of the new system and its impact on the company's overall value. To ensure the success of the shift from unstructured to structured OJT, ADEK's top management unit has to devise strategies to address these problems.

Implementing Theories and Theoretical Ideas

Frequently, the process of change is marked by various obstacles. Jabri (2017) notes that if a company is unprepared to face such problems, it is likely to fall short of its goals, especially if key stakeholders are unwilling to support it. The HR Department of ADEK has decided to replace the unstructured OJT model with the structured model due to the various issues with the previous system. In this section, the researcher concentrated on addressing several theories and theoretical notions that the Human Resources department of this firm can employ to address the identified challenges and improve performance.

Creating consultative forums prior to bringing change, according to Pasmore (2015), is one of the greatest strategies to overcome the barrier of change resistance. The plan ensures that everyone comprehends why a new system is necessary and prepares sufficiently for its implementation without fear of being negatively affected. The organizational development consulting cycle is one of the theoretical concepts that this company should employ to engage various stakeholders and prepare them for the implementation of the new system. The steps involved are depicted in the diagram below:

Figure 1. Cycle of organizational development consulting (Myers, Hulks, & Wiggins, 2012, p. 45).

The diagnosis is the initial step. The management of ADEK should perform an evaluation to determine the efficacy of the current system, identify its significant deficiencies, and determine how to solve them. The diagnostic has already revealed that unstructured OJT is inefficient, time-consuming, and prone to costly errors. The next step is feedback and action determination. The report provided by those who did the diagnosis should include the correct management decision. The team had argued that implementing organized OJT is the best course of action for the firm. The third step is establishing an intention strategy.

The model necessitates that the management consult with all stakeholders and explain to them the result of the analysis and the choice to act. They must comprehend why a particular option should be made to address an identified issue. When consensus has been reached, the next step is plan implementation. In order to implement the new training model, the company must engage trainers who will be responsible for providing newly hired staff with practical skills. The company's employees, management, and shareholders should support the new practice. The third stage is entrance and contracting, which involves integrating the new practice into the culture of the business.

Kotter's model for addressing the problems of change would also be essential for assuring the success of this company's introduction of the new concept. The model lists eight stages that should be taken by management when adopting a new system. The initial stage is to create an atmosphere of urgency. Management should make employees and other important stakeholders aware of the urgent need to fix the organization's current problems.

The group should then establish a formidable guiding coalition. Individuals from various HR departments within ADEK should come together and devise a method for replacing the old model with the new one. They should construct a vision that will lead the organization's process of introducing change. When bringing change, Jabri (2017) thinks that a common vision inside an organization is essential. It aids in elucidating the company's goals in replacing unstructured OJT with the new model. The fourth step is vision communication. The team must guarantee that everyone comprehends its significance and how it will be implemented.

The model demands management to grant everyone the authority to act on the vision. Instead of coercing employees to adopt the new system, management should prepare them with the skills necessary to function effectively under the new system. It is essential to plan for and create short-term gains when employing this technique. Instead of assessing long-term objectives at the conclusion of a fiscal year, management should implement a new approach in which gains can be evaluated monthly or every two weeks. Consolidating and initiating more adjustments is the next step.

The improvements acquired should serve as a foundation for achieving even greater success. The organization is able to prevent disruptive abrupt changes due to the organization's gradual development. The final step is to institutionalize new methods. The new procedures should become standard across the organization and be supported by both management and staff. Figure 2 outlines the eight stages that ADEK management should consider doing when implementing the new procedures.

Figure 2: Kotter's Eight Change Challenges (Myers et al., 2012, p. 45).

It is not certain that all members of an organization will support a change that is introduced. Sometimes the adoption of a new system is contingent on the strength of the person enforcing it. The management of ADEK should recognize that occasionally people accept change based primarily on the amount of authority of the person who proposes it. The Individual Power Grounds Model, seen in Figure 3 below, identifies six power bases upon which managers might implement the new practice.

Positional power is generated from a person's formal position within an organization (Jabri, 2017). Therefore, before establishing such an essential practice, ADEK should verify that it has the support of the top management unit. Due to his position within the company, the head of human resources is in the ideal position to spearhead this shift. Personal or referent power refers to an individual's influence on the public due to their popularity (Campbell, 2014). Union leaders and influential employees should be persuaded to endorse the new training model due to their ability to persuade large numbers of individuals to enroll in a given course.

When adopting a new, unpopular system, coercion may not be the optimal strategy, but it is occasionally required. According to Kotter (2014), it is the use of authoritarian power to compel individuals to act in a particular way. When a portion of the HR Department's employees are making unreasonable requests, it may be necessary to use coercive force. Expertise is an additional force that may aid the team in introducing the new system.

Respect is earned by having sufficient understanding of a topic, which can be used to influence others to behave in a particular manner. When establishing the new training model, the management of ADEK should involve a team of specialists to demonstrate to other stakeholders that the business is committed to enhancing operational efficiency and effectiveness. Information power is an additional significant factor to consider. Making relevant facts accessible to all would persuade them that the new initiative is pertinent. The third issue that management should evaluate is the reward power. Employees that excel within the system should be rewarded for their hard work.

Figure 3. separate power bases (Myers et al., 2012, p. 65).

Discussion

Through ADEK, the Abu Dhabi government has been committed to bringing the quality of education in the emirate up to worldwide standards. To guarantee that the necessary level of quality is attained, the department has enacted a number of measures aimed at empowering teachers and other relevant parties. The department has programs designed to increase the employees' practical skills. The management's choice to go from unstructured OJT to structured OJT demonstrates the company's dedication to enhancing the quality of its products.

Various models for the change process have been identified from the analyses presented previously. The theoretical principles describe how this company can implement the new practice without encountering opposition from the necessary stakeholders. Resistance to change may have severe negative effects on the organization. Campbell (2014) demonstrates that applying proper change management models does not guarantee the absence of opposition during the change process.

The change wave model, depicted in Figure 4, helps to specify how to address difficulties that may develop while transitioning from an unstructured to a structured on-the-job training model based on the morale of the employees over time. When employees learn that system changes may occur, their initial response is frequently shock. The shock causes a precipitous decline in their morale. They will then experience denial in the hope that old systems will be reinstated. The brief period of denial results in an improvement in morale. When people learn that the new systems are permanent, they become enraged and then negotiate with authorities to reinstate the original system. At the bottom of the curve comes depression, which occurs when individuals understand that their efforts to fight change were fruitless.

Employee morale is frequently at its lowest point during this time (Jabri, 2017). They will next go through the acceptance and testing phase of the new system to see how well they can carry out their particular responsibilities. The morale will improve at these stages. The final step is progression or departure. Those that are open to change will accept the new system and study ways to increase their productivity under it. Those unable to accept change will be required to consider leaving the organization. If the new method will have the desired effect on the business, the HR department should not worry losing a few people who are unable to accept change.

Figure 4: Variation wave (Myers et al., 2012, p. 78).

Conclusion

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge has remained dedicated to ensuring that the emirate's educational standards remain at the greatest possible level. As a result, the company has taken steps to guarantee that its personnel are qualified to assume a variety of educational tasks. Recently, it was stated that its new staff training program would transition from unstructured OJT to organized OJT. Studies have shown a number of advantages of organized OJT, including a reduction in the cost and duration of training, an improvement in productivity, and the capacity to transfer certain skills to new employees in a predetermined manner. However, management must be prepared to face numerous obstacles, including resistance to change. The paper identifies a variety of models that can be utilized to solve potential implementation-related obstacles.

References

Campbell, H. (2014). Managing organizational change. Philadelphia, PA: Kogan Page.

Goksoy, A. (Ed). (2016). Strategies for managing organizational change in modern company. Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global.

Jabri, M. (2017). Managing Organizational Change: Process, Social Construction, and Communication London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kotter, J.P. (2014). Accelerate: Developing strategic agility for a world that moves quicker. Harvard Business Review Press, Boston, MA.

Myers, P., Hulks, S., & Wiggins, L. (2012). Changes in Organizational Structures Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press

Pamel, M.V. (2013). Best practices for on-the-job training: structured versus unstructured on-the-job training. Web.

Pasmore, W.A. (2015). Leading continuous change: Navigating churn in the real world. Oakland, CA : Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

[supanova question]

Managing Organizational Changes In ADEK Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Applying Theories and Theoretical Concepts to Problem Definition and Change Identification Conclusion of Discussion References

Introduction

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge, or ADEK, is the educational body of Abu Dhabi. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed al Nahyan, president of the United Arab Emirates, founded ADEK in 2005 for the primary purpose of administering and managing public schools throughout the emirate (Goksoy, 2016). It also regulates and oversees private schools in the country to ensure that they adhere to the appropriate regional educational requirements.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, who is also the crown prince of the UAE, presently serves as the institution's chairman. ADEK has been focused on ensuring that the country's educational standards align with global best practices established by Europe, North America, East Asia, and other nations (Jabri, 2017). As a result, the management has been eager to provide frequent training to its personnel in order to equip them with new abilities. Prior to being entrusted with additional responsibilities, ADEK's human resources (HR) division requires new hires to complete regular training programs. The purpose of such trainings is to ensure that participants acquire the necessary practical skills for their respective fields.

The HR department of ADEK has been utilizing unstructured On-the-Job-Training (OJT) to increase the competence of new hires. However, the HR department's management observed that the trend is shifting and organized OJT is becoming more popular due to its efficacy. As a result, the institution decided to go from unstructured to structured OJT in order to increase productivity, save expenses, and ensure that the desired training objectives are met in the quickest time feasible. According to Kotter (2014), introducing change within an organization necessitates addressing multiple obstacles, such as opposition to new practices.

The goal of this article is to illustrate the transition from one training model to another inside this company. The study examined difficulties associated with such procedures, methods for overcoming such difficulties, models that this organization should consider using, and the advantages of the approach.

Definition of the Issue and Identification of Change

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge has been intent on strengthening its employees' ability to do a variety of tasks. Historically, the HR Department utilized unstructured on-the-job training. Unstructured OJT is defined by Pamel (2013) as "a training program in which a new employee works with an experienced employee or supervisor who serves as a mentor in an observe-and-imitate training process" (para. 3).

In this situation, the new employee is expected to gain practical skills by observing an experienced coworker. In the majority of instances, there is no question-and-answer session. It relies heavily on observation (Jabri, 2017). It was deemed effective in providing practical skills to the company's new hires. However, recent research clearly suggests that unstructured OJT is ineffective at enhancing the skills of new hires. It is unclear how such recruits should acquire knowledge in a methodical manner.

Due to the rarity of question-and-answer sessions, training recruits may take longer and be more expensive. Campbell (2014) contends that sabotage may be prevalent while utilizing unstructured OJT. Employees with expertise may intentionally mislead rookies in order to avoid passing on their knowledge. They may believe that expressing their experience will make them less valued to the company and, therefore, more susceptible.

The management discovered that it was taking its new workers a considerable amount of time to acquire the practical skills necessary to assume a variety of duties. Some of the errors that some of these employees were doing were costly to the company, making it difficult for the management to entrust them with crucial responsibilities without the oversight of seasoned staff. The HR department of ADEK recognized that the system required modification.

Structured OJT was regarded as the most effective approach of teaching new employees practical skills. Pamel (2013) describes structured OJT as "a program designed to teach new employees the skills necessary to complete a task successfully" (para. 4). The primary distinction between organized and unstructured OJT is the delivery method. While unstructured OJT expects individuals to learn through workplace observation, structured OJT is a learning program led by a trained individual. The trainer works with the new recruits, describing what should be done at a particular time and why. In On-the-Job-Training, the trainer employs a curriculum to describe the abilities that must be acquired within a given time frame (Goksoy, 2016).

Trainees are encouraged to ask questions if they have confusion about a topic. This systematic training, according to Kotter (2014), requires less time, is less expensive, and minimizes the number of errors made by employees while doing their regular activities. It is more efficient than the unstructured model for training newly hired personnel. Due to the benefits of the structured model, a number of large multinational organizations are replacing unstructured OJT with it. As a result, the administration of this institution saw that introducing the new model was the most effective means of overcoming obstacles encountered when using the traditional model.

The unstructured OJT had become a typical practice in the HR division of ADEK. The management did not need to recruit experts to assist with employee training. Instead, skilled employees were expected to work alongside those with less training. The introduction of the new model posed a challenge that management had to handle. According to Campbell (2014), the process of transformation in an organization is frequently marked by numerous obstacles.

Many stakeholders may attempt to resist change for various reasons. The management may reject change if it necessitates incurring new expenses that were not anticipated for in the current fiscal year. Changes of this magnitude frequently necessitate the reorganization of multiple systems inside the business. Some employees may resist change out of concern that new organizational procedures and structures will render their services obsolete. A company's shareholders may be concerned about the profitability of the new system and its impact on the company's overall value. To ensure the success of the shift from unstructured to structured OJT, ADEK's top management unit has to devise strategies to address these problems.

Implementing Theories and Theoretical Ideas

Frequently, the process of change is marked by various obstacles. Jabri (2017) notes that if a company is unprepared to face such problems, it is likely to fall short of its goals, especially if key stakeholders are unwilling to support it. The HR Department of ADEK has decided to replace the unstructured OJT model with the structured model due to the various issues with the previous system. In this section, the researcher concentrated on addressing several theories and theoretical notions that the Human Resources department of this firm can employ to address the identified challenges and improve performance.

Creating consultative forums prior to bringing change, according to Pasmore (2015), is one of the greatest strategies to overcome the barrier of change resistance. The plan ensures that everyone comprehends why a new system is necessary and prepares sufficiently for its implementation without fear of being negatively affected. The organizational development consulting cycle is one of the theoretical concepts that this company should employ to engage various stakeholders and prepare them for the implementation of the new system. The steps involved are depicted in the diagram below:

Figure 1. Cycle of organizational development consulting (Myers, Hulks, & Wiggins, 2012, p. 45).

The diagnosis is the initial step. The management of ADEK should perform an evaluation to determine the efficacy of the current system, identify its significant deficiencies, and determine how to solve them. The diagnostic has already revealed that unstructured OJT is inefficient, time-consuming, and prone to costly errors. The next step is feedback and action determination. The report provided by those who did the diagnosis should include the correct management decision. The team had argued that implementing organized OJT is the best course of action for the firm. The third step is establishing an intention strategy.

The model necessitates that the management consult with all stakeholders and explain to them the result of the analysis and the choice to act. They must comprehend why a particular option should be made to address an identified issue. When consensus has been reached, the next step is plan implementation. In order to implement the new training model, the company must engage trainers who will be responsible for providing newly hired staff with practical skills. The company's employees, management, and shareholders should support the new practice. The third stage is entrance and contracting, which involves integrating the new practice into the culture of the business.

Kotter's model for addressing the problems of change would also be essential for assuring the success of this company's introduction of the new concept. The model lists eight stages that should be taken by management when adopting a new system. The initial stage is to create an atmosphere of urgency. Management should make employees and other important stakeholders aware of the urgent need to fix the organization's current problems.

The group should then establish a formidable guiding coalition. Individuals from various HR departments within ADEK should come together and devise a method for replacing the old model with the new one. They should construct a vision that will lead the organization's process of introducing change. When bringing change, Jabri (2017) thinks that a common vision inside an organization is essential. It aids in elucidating the company's goals in replacing unstructured OJT with the new model. The fourth step is vision communication. The team must guarantee that everyone comprehends its significance and how it will be implemented.

The model demands management to grant everyone the authority to act on the vision. Instead of coercing employees to adopt the new system, management should prepare them with the skills necessary to function effectively under the new system. It is essential to plan for and create short-term gains when employing this technique. Instead of assessing long-term objectives at the conclusion of a fiscal year, management should implement a new approach in which gains can be evaluated monthly or every two weeks. Consolidating and initiating more adjustments is the next step.

The improvements acquired should serve as a foundation for achieving even greater success. The organization is able to prevent disruptive abrupt changes due to the organization's gradual development. The final step is to institutionalize new methods. The new procedures should become standard across the organization and be supported by both management and staff. Figure 2 outlines the eight stages that ADEK management should consider doing when implementing the new procedures.

Figure 2: Kotter's Eight Change Challenges (Myers et al., 2012, p. 45).

It is not certain that all members of an organization will support a change that is introduced. Sometimes the adoption of a new system is contingent on the strength of the person enforcing it. The management of ADEK should recognize that occasionally people accept change based primarily on the amount of authority of the person who proposes it. The Individual Power Grounds Model, seen in Figure 3 below, identifies six power bases upon which managers might implement the new practice.

Positional power is generated from a person's formal position within an organization (Jabri, 2017). Therefore, before establishing such an essential practice, ADEK should verify that it has the support of the top management unit. Due to his position within the company, the head of human resources is in the ideal position to spearhead this shift. Personal or referent power refers to an individual's influence on the public due to their popularity (Campbell, 2014). Union leaders and influential employees should be persuaded to endorse the new training model due to their ability to persuade large numbers of individuals to enroll in a given course.

When adopting a new, unpopular system, coercion may not be the optimal strategy, but it is occasionally required. According to Kotter (2014), it is the use of authoritarian power to compel individuals to act in a particular way. When a portion of the HR Department's employees are making unreasonable requests, it may be necessary to use coercive force. Expertise is an additional force that may aid the team in introducing the new system.

Respect is earned by having sufficient understanding of a topic, which can be used to influence others to behave in a particular manner. When establishing the new training model, the management of ADEK should involve a team of specialists to demonstrate to other stakeholders that the business is committed to enhancing operational efficiency and effectiveness. Information power is an additional significant factor to consider. Making relevant facts accessible to all would persuade them that the new initiative is pertinent. The third issue that management should evaluate is the reward power. Employees that excel within the system should be rewarded for their hard work.

Figure 3. separate power bases (Myers et al., 2012, p. 65).

Discussion

Through ADEK, the Abu Dhabi government has been committed to bringing the quality of education in the emirate up to worldwide standards. To guarantee that the necessary level of quality is attained, the department has enacted a number of measures aimed at empowering teachers and other relevant parties. The department has programs designed to increase the employees' practical skills. The management's choice to go from unstructured OJT to structured OJT demonstrates the company's dedication to enhancing the quality of its products.

Various models for the change process have been identified from the analyses presented previously. The theoretical principles describe how this company can implement the new practice without encountering opposition from the necessary stakeholders. Resistance to change may have severe negative effects on the organization. Campbell (2014) demonstrates that applying proper change management models does not guarantee the absence of opposition during the change process.

The change wave model, depicted in Figure 4, helps to specify how to address difficulties that may develop while transitioning from an unstructured to a structured on-the-job training model based on the morale of the employees over time. When employees learn that system changes may occur, their initial response is frequently shock. The shock causes a precipitous decline in their morale. They will then experience denial in the hope that old systems will be reinstated. The brief period of denial results in an improvement in morale. When people learn that the new systems are permanent, they become enraged and then negotiate with authorities to reinstate the original system. At the bottom of the curve comes depression, which occurs when individuals understand that their efforts to fight change were fruitless.

Employee morale is frequently at its lowest point during this time (Jabri, 2017). They will next go through the acceptance and testing phase of the new system to see how well they can carry out their particular responsibilities. The morale will improve at these stages. The final step is progression or departure. Those that are open to change will accept the new system and study ways to increase their productivity under it. Those unable to accept change will be required to consider leaving the organization. If the new method will have the desired effect on the business, the HR department should not worry losing a few people who are unable to accept change.

Figure 4: Variation wave (Myers et al., 2012, p. 78).

Conclusion

The Abu Dhabi Department of Education and Knowledge has remained dedicated to ensuring that the emirate's educational standards remain at the greatest possible level. As a result, the company has taken steps to guarantee that its personnel are qualified to assume a variety of educational tasks. Recently, it was stated that its new staff training program would transition from unstructured OJT to organized OJT. Studies have shown a number of advantages of organized OJT, including a reduction in the cost and duration of training, an improvement in productivity, and the capacity to transfer certain skills to new employees in a predetermined manner. However, management must be prepared to face numerous obstacles, including resistance to change. The paper identifies a variety of models that can be utilized to solve potential implementation-related obstacles.

References

Campbell, H. (2014). Managing organizational change. Philadelphia, PA: Kogan Page.

Goksoy, A. (Ed). (2016). Strategies for managing organizational change in modern company. Hershey, Pennsylvania: IGI Global.

Jabri, M. (2017). Managing Organizational Change: Process, Social Construction, and Communication London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.

Kotter, J.P. (2014). Accelerate: Developing strategic agility for a world that moves quicker. Harvard Business Review Press, Boston, MA.

Myers, P., Hulks, S., & Wiggins, L. (2012). Changes in Organizational Structures Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press

Pamel, M.V. (2013). Best practices for on-the-job training: structured versus unstructured on-the-job training. Web.

Pasmore, W.A. (2015). Leading continuous change: Navigating churn in the real world. Oakland, CA : Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

[supanova question]

Case Studies Of Negligence: Ella And David Mba Essay Help

Introduction

The essay addresses the notion of negligence and its practical implementation. Consequently, the paper applies the idea of carelessness to a case study in which Ella lost a $40 million contract because she missed her trip owing to airline maintenance concerns. The other case study describes how David was injured after he tripped over the laundry equipment Emily left on the sidewalk.

The purpose of this article is to determine if Ella and David can receive monetary compensation for their negligence-related injuries.

This article addresses the idea of negligence and the elements of negligence, including the duty of care, damages, and violation of duty, in order to demonstrate their cases.

Negligence

There are numerous definitions for the concept of negligence. Negligence is often defined as the failure to act with appropriate skill and care to avert damages. Under tort law, the idea of carelessness can be examined from multiple angles. Simons (2002) defines negligence as posing an unjustified risk to a third party, which could have been avoided by taking the required safeguards. Nevertheless, the author's definition reveals that a person might be charged of duty-related negligence if he or she knowingly produces an act of negligence when the harm caused to a subject could have been prevented.

There are, however, instances of gross negligence in which there is a reckless demonstration of a substantial lack of care towards the possibility of danger to the person. (Larson, 2003).

Mahoney's (1990) definition of negligence is sufficiently elaborate. According to the author, negligence occurs when a person's skills deviate from those anticipated of a competent or certified professional. In legal terms, carelessness does not exist unless a person is injured. Thus, a person cannot accuse another of negligence unless damage has occurred.

In the common law of the United States, negligence is defined as conduct that no reasonable person would have engaged in. A surgeon who leaves surgical equipment within a patient's body is a typical case of negligence per se. (2006) Harris, Richards, and Fincham.

Nevertheless, ignorance involves three components. The next portion of the text addresses the elements of negligence.

Element of negligence

The factors of negligence are separated into three categories. The elements of negligence, according to Owen (2007), include duty, breach, damage, and causation.

Nonetheless, this study distinguishes the aspects of carelessness as the duty of care, the breach of duty, and the damage.

Responsibility for care

The term "duty of care" refers to the standard of care that a professional is obligated to uphold when acting within the scope of his employment. Typically, a person's duty of care pertains to the policies, processes, and protocols applicable to his occupation. (2004). (Ashley, 2004). Essentially, the duty of care requires a person undertaking professional tasks to adhere to acceptable standards. It should be emphasized that any negligence in the performance of a duty that results in damages to a client and approaches strict liability may be considered negligence in the performance of a duty. California State University, Sacramento

A company is required by law to take reasonable precautions to protect its clients from unforeseen damages. Although the law recognizes that a person with a duty must exert reasonable care, certain precautions are taken before a person can be found negligent in his or her obligation. Leonard (2007) contended that a plaintiff must prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a defendant committed successful negligence and breached a duty in a way that caused the plaintiff unreasonable injury.

Therefore, establishing reasonable foreseeability is a crucial element of demonstrating negligence in a court of law.

Reasonable anticipation

Proving negligence in the duty of care should involve reasonable foreseeability, wherein a plaintiff can demonstrate to the court that a defendant can reasonably anticipate that negligence in the duty of care can actually result in injury. It should be mentioned that most courts readily reach judgements with the concept of reasonable foreseeability since it aids the court in making an objective determination whether reasonable foreseeability can be demonstrated. (2009) Oxford University Press.

To demonstrate reasonable foreseeability, a plaintiff must demonstrate that defendants might have reasonably anticipated or predicted that their actions could cause economic loss or harm to the plaintiff. For instance, the Hay (or Bourhill v. Young [1943 AC 92] case (Harvey, 2007).

In addition, the plaintiff must demonstrate that the defendants are vulnerable.

Vulnerability

Vulnerability refers to whether the defendants and the plaintiff are in a position of reliance. Thus, to establish vulnerability, it must be demonstrated that the plaintiff is in a position of weakness and powerlessness, whereas the defendant has acquired knowledge, resources, and rights.

Use of negligence in the case studies

pertaining to case study 2

Ella had already purchased an airline ticket, and she was scheduled to be in Sydney on Friday to speak with her client about the $40 million business proposal. Due to airplane maintenance concerns, however, she was unable to close her business transaction. (Leonard, 2007). Ella has already made up her mind that she will fly with this airline at the specified period in order to secure a business agreement. Ella can successfully sue the airline for breach of duty of care by missing her flight. The negligent misstatement has caused Ella economic loss, per the law. In the meantime, Ella can effectively demonstrate that the airline caused her economic loss since she relied on the defendant's statement and, by reasonably relying on the statement, suffered economic damage. (Harvey, 2007).

In the meanwhile, Ella can recover her economic loss if she can demonstrate that the airline's repair genuinely caused her economic loss. According to the argument, "a successful negligence action requires a plaintiff to demonstrate that the defendant owed a duty of care and breached that duty by creating an unreasonable risk of harm." (Mallor, 2001, p. 277). In fact, Ella had previously reserved a seat with the airline, and it is the carrier's responsibility to notify her that there may be maintenance issues on the aircraft and a flight delay, which may prevent her from traveling on time. Due to the airline's failure to notify Ella of the maintenance concerns, they are liable for economic damage. Therefore, the airline breached its duty of care by failing to warn Ella. Mallor, for example, noted that

"In Coombes v. Florio, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) considered whether a physician's duty of care extends to third parties injured by the physician's failure to advise a patient of the side effects of a prescribed prescription. The court ruled that a physician owed a duty of reasonable care to everyone put at danger by the physician's omission to notify patients. (200, p. 277).

In the first case study, however, David cannot effectively sue Emily or Wipe away Pty Ltd to collect his medical expenditures and lost wages. In essence, Emily or Wipeaway Pty Ltd owes no duty to David, and the accident that occurred to David was not foreseeable. Therefore, David cannot prove that the injury he has sustained could have been reasonably anticipated. In addition, the plaintiff will have difficulty enforcing the duty of care on the defendants in order to recover damages. For instance, "a plaintiff in a case alleging negligence must demonstrate not only that the defendant breached a duty owed to the plaintiff, but also that the plaintiff suffered actual harm." (Page 4 of California State University)

David may have sustained an injury, but based on this statement, he cannot demonstrate that Wipeaway Pty Ltd owed him a duty of care. Therefore, David will have difficulty proving his case in court in order to recoup medical expenses and lost wages for the harm he has sustained.

Damages

Damages are the money that a plaintiff is permitted to claim if he or she can prove to the court that the defendant's act of carelessness caused the subject bodily injury. Essentially, a plaintiff can recover monetary compensation for the harm he sustained owing to the breach of duty of care. (Fershtman, nd).

In relation to case study 1, David wishes to file a claim for damages since he was injured when he stepped on the cleaning equipment Emily left on the footpath. In this case, David is unable to file a claim for damages since the defendant cannot be judged negligent in her duties. Moreover, it was not reasonable to anticipate that David would walk on the vacuum cleaner. The instance of comes from the Oxford University Press guide.

3 Crossley v. Rawlinson (1981) All ER 674 determined that an injury to a would-be rescuer was not foreseeable because the harm occurred en route to the hazardous situation. According to the court, the claimant's harm occurred in an unforeseen manner. (2009, p 73).

Therefore, it should be understood that David must prove foreseeability of result in court before he may recover damages from the defendants. (2009) Oxford University Press.

Since the event is unforeseeable, David will have a difficult time convincing the jury that Emily or Wipeaway Pty Ltd's breach of the duty of care caused his harm.

In example 2, however, Ella can recover damages because the delay of the plane was predictable; therefore, Ella can sue the airline for economic loss. It should be emphasized that Ella may be able to prove that there was a reasonable opportunity to avoid her from missing her planned departure and that the airline broke their obligation by causing Ella economic loss. (2009) Oxford University Press.

Violation of Duty

A breach of duty is simply failing to adhere to a reasonable norm of behaviour, which can result in the harm or injury of another individual. Typically, a breach of duty can also be characterized as a violation of a person's moral or legal duty. Essentially, obligation must be established before a breach of duty may be considered. Thus, once the obligation is established, standard care can be created. (Larson, 2003).

Thus, negligence can be established by the breach of duty. To demonstrate, however, that the defendant broke his duty of care. Certain requirements must be met. The plaintiff must prove that the defendant owed him a duty of care. In addition, the plaintiff must prove the level of duty of care owed to him by the defendants. Thus, in order to show a breach of duty, the defendant must be able to demonstrate that the plaintiff is able to anticipate that the injury can be caused by a violation of duty.

With the application of a breach of duty to case study 1, in which David received a physical injury because he fell over the cleaning equipment left on the footpath, David incurred a physical injury as a result. In reality, David cannot collect medical bills or lost wages if he sues Wipeaway Pty Ltd or Emily because no responsibility exists between them. Thus, David cannot demonstrate that Wipeaway Pty Ltd violated an established responsibility. In addition, David will be unable to prove that Emily is reasonable enough to anticipate the physical injury that would result from slipping on the cleaning equipment. Therefore, David will be unable to prove his case or win this lawsuit in court.

Nonetheless, applying the breach of duty to case 2, Ella missed her trip due to the airline's negligence, causing her economic loss. Ella can prove with reasonable certainty that a responsibility exists between her and the airline. Therefore, by missing the flight, the airline has violated the duty norm. In addition, Ella can demonstrate that Airline was rational enough to anticipate the harm she suffered. Consequently, the airline took no efforts to prevent the damage. In the meantime, the airline has actually violated the duty norm. Ella can recoup her loss from the airline if she files a claim for damages.

Conclusion

This study examines two cases in which negligence has been proven. The paper demonstrates that in case study 1, David cannot collect medical expenses or lost wages owing to his injuries since it will be difficult to prove that Emily truly anticipated the accident. Additionally, no obligation exists between David and Wipeaway Pty Ltd. In Case study 2, however, Ella can seek damages because she has created an obligation to the airline and the airline was able to anticipate the injury. Therefore, the airline has carelessly breached the obligation norm, causing Ella to incur economic damage.

References

The third factor of negligence. Critical Care Nurse, 24, 3, pp. 65-66.

California State College (nd) Understanding the Differences Between 1) Intentional Tort Liability, 2) Negligence Liability, and 3) Strict Liability, is the second key concept. Northridge.USA.

Understanding Negligence, Allen Financial Insurance Group, Phoenix, Arizona, Fershtman, J.

Harris, C. E., W. Richards, and J. E. Fincham (2006), "Professional Negligence: When Practice Goes Wrong: Defined Negligence," MedScape Today, The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 40(7), pp. 377-1382.

Harvey, C. (2007). Foundation of Australian Law, Chapter 6: Tort of Negligence, second edition, Tilde University Press, Australia.

(2003). Negligence and Tort Law, ExpertLaw, Law Offices of Aaron Larson.UK. Larson, A.

2007) Lonard Comment Final, Tort Law—Extending Physician's Duty of Care to Third Parties for Breach of Duty Owed to Patient—Coombes v. Florio, 877 N.E.2d 567 (Mass.

"NEGLIGENCE AND INDEMNITY," Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 8, no. 1 (1990), pp. 38-52.

Mallor, J. P. (2001). Business Law and the Regulatory Environment, Concepts and Cases (10th edition), Richard d. Irwin, United States of America.

Owen, D. G. (2007). "THE FIVE ELEMENTS OF NEGLIGENCE," Hofstra Law Review, Volume 35, Number 4, Pages 1671-1686.

(2009), Oxford University Press, UK, Negligence II: cause and distance of damage.

Simons, K. W. (2002) ‘Dimensions of Negligence in Criminal and Tort Law’, Theoretical Inquiries in Law, 3,(2), pp: 2-57.

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Short-Term Wins & Momentum In Change Management Mba Essay Help

Introduction

There are several milestones inside the potential change that must be attained during the process. These are components of Kotter's (2012) eight stages of organizational change. Planning and celebrating short-term successes constitute the sixth and most critical part of the process. They supply the entire crew with incentive by helping them to complete the transition process (Gilley, 2001). Additionally, it reflects the progress made and establishes the pace for the subsequent milestone.

Wins and Progress

Milestone 1

It entails the introduction of new policies that enable transformations that lead to success. The application of rules and regulations to govern every action in the corporate sector. Consequently, the establishment of policies permits the changes to occur, as there were previously no policies in place to regulate their existence (Vogelsang, 2013). This milestone will be reached at the start of the entire transformation process. Before initiating any change initiative, the policies governing its existence must be in place. They will prepare the path for the changes to occur since management guidelines will be established (Vogelsang, 2013). It is important since it instructs planners on the process's activities. Therefore, implementations can be carried out by anyone so long as they adhere to the stipulations (Black & Gregersen, 2008). They provide a set of guidelines or instructions that should be implemented. In this instance, everyone is aware of the rules to follow in the event of any technicalities or occurrences. As a result, there is less time wasted on superfluous consultations, and the process is carried out in a methodical manner because all parties understand their roles (Willard, 2009). The achievement is commemorated by instituting a reward system for all participants in the prospective change endeavor. The awards might take numerous shapes and designs that are tailored to suit the needs of the participants. For instance, the individuals concerned can take a break and recuperate for a while before returning to business as usual (Erskine, 2013). It will give the requisite motivation for achieving subsequent change initiative milestones (Vogelsang, 2013). The established policies and regulations permit the achievement of following milestones. It establishes the direction for future milestones by identifying needs. Each opens the door to the next, therefore this milestone is open-ended and offers a framework for the subsequent one (Erskine, 2013).

Milestone 2

Installation of the requisite infrastructure to implement the possible change project. Depending on the type of change taking place, a set of necessary accessories is required to facilitate the shift (Kotter, 2012). The milestone can be attained through the process of change. As the change effort advances, the need for equipment and materials emerges, resulting in an increase in demand for such products (Gilley, 2001). The success of the transition depends on these factors, making their presence vital. The transformation is a methodical, multi-factored process initiated before its real necessity. It gives an excellent foundation for implementing the change initiative (Kotter, 2012). This accomplishment must be commemorated to serve as motivation for those involved in the process. An comprehensive celebration plan is developed to ensure that there is a reward system (Kinicki & Williams, 2008). The incentive system will include a break for the employees, a recognition event, and a test to ensure that everything is functioning properly. These items will give the momentum necessary to implement the possible change effort, as the infrastructure is already in place to enable the achievement of the next milestone. The milestones are interdependent, thus they will all require existing infrastructure to ensure that they are achieved (Willard, 2009).

Milestone 3

Assuring everything is functioning as intended. Existing equipment should be examined to confirm that it is functioning as intended. Once everything is in working order, a milestone has been reached and should be recognized (Black & Gregersen, 2008). The achievement of the milestone will occur near the conclusion of the change project, prior to the introduction of the resulting product. After this, the next step is to deploy and implement the developed adjustments. This achievement signifies the conclusion of the transformation process. After this has been realized, the program will be initiated and monitored to guarantee there are no system problems (Willard, 2009). The milestone is essential since it signifies the conclusion of the transformation process. After achievement, the product is launched and the change procedure is implemented. The achievement signifies that the effort was a total success and that the new measures are now prepared for implementation (Kotter, 2012). The milestone is commemorated by embracing the most recent accomplishment of finishing the entire transformation project because it is realized at the conclusion of the program. All parties involved in the process are compensated for their efforts, and the public is able to enjoy the newly provided, efficient services. The reward mechanism utilized here is vital, since it serves as encouragement for the people the next time a similar change endeavor is necessary. However, the feeling of having accomplished such an important duty is rewarding and can serve as a type of self-reward (Black & Gregersen, 2008). The momentum to carry out the initiative's shift step is based on the achievement of the current milestone's successful testing. If all conditions are met, the entire change project is implemented. After the testing phase is complete, the subsequent phase can begin. This phase's success provides the impetus necessary to go to the subsequent phase (Erskine, 2013).

Conclusion

Short-term successes are essential for the achievement of long-term goals and objectives. These short-term victories must possess a variety of criteria in order to be recognized as such. The wines must be visible to a large number of people to the point that they can identify them and acknowledge their existence. In addition, they should be able to generate as few arguments as feasible concerning them (Black & Gregersen, 2008). In addition to being clear and accurate, they should have a direct relationship to the change taking place. Moreover, the individuals should comprehend their role in the process.

References

Black, J. S., & Gregersen, H. B. (2008). It Begins With One; Individual Change Changes Organizations. Pearson Education Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey

Erskine, P. (2013). Organizational Change and ITIL IT Governance Publishing, Ely.

J. W. Gilley (2001). The Manager as Change Agent: A Guide for Developing High-Performance People and Organizations is a practical guide for managers who are tasked with developing high-performance individuals and organizations. The Cambridge, Massachusetts location of Perseus Publishers.

Kotter, J. (2012). Influencing Change Harvard Business Review Press, Boston.

Kinicki, A., & Williams, B. K. (2008). Management: An Introduction to Practice McGraw-Hill/Irwin is located at New York's McGraw-Hill/Irwin.

Willard, B. (2009). The Sustainability Champion's Guidebook: Transforming Your Organization. Gabriola Island, British Columbia: New Society Publishers

Vogelsang, J. (2013). The OD Network's Handbook for Strategic HR: Best Practices in Organizational Development. American Management Association, New York.

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NIO Company, Legal And Ethical Issues Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Potential Legal and Moral Concerns The Ethics and Business Conduct Management Structure of NIO Background of the CEO Conclusion References

Introduction

NIO is one of the largest automobile manufacturers in China. Since its founding in 2014, the company has grown through public and private financing. However, experts anticipate a slowdown in growth, which could result in significant concerns and possibly legal and ethical dilemmas. These obstacles will surely impact the health of the company's 6,000 employees, as well as its CEO and management. The purpose of this article is to discuss the legal and ethical issues NIO faces, outline its management structure, and provide a brief biography of its chief executive officer.

Potential Legal and Moral Concerns

NIO may soon encounter difficulties despite its consistent growth and continuous development in past years. Particularly, experts estimate that at the conclusion of the third quarter of 2019, the company's shares have dropped 77%. (Markoch, 2019). It is believed that this may result in the company's insolvency, given that its business relies heavily on investors (Markoch, 2019). NIO is a joint venture with E-Town Capital, a Beijing-based international investment and development firm, and may have hoped for government help. However, there is currently no evidence that these hopes will be realized.

China has been known to incentivize electric vehicle sales with incentives of up to $7,500 per vehicle. Nonetheless, the government's decision to reduce assistance resulted in the demise of other less competitive startups and posed grave dangers to NIO. These threats originate from the company's inability to get the necessary investments to sustain its business. In addition, decreased production and demand will increase operational expenses.

According to experts, the corporation has only $503.4 million in cash as of June 30, 2019, (Markoch, 2019). Tencent had wanted to give NIO $200 million in cash, but the transaction fell through. In addition, the authorities of Wuxing District refused to fund the promised $707 million, citing extreme dangers. The shrinkage of the domestic market owing to intense competition was similarly significant. The Chinese government plans to boost the percentage of electric vehicles from 4% to 20% by 2025. (Markoch, 2019). In order to maintain low operating costs, factories must produce tens of thousands of vehicles each year, which is insufficient to meet the demand for all existing manufacturers.

NIO may face ethical and legal issues if it fails to attract investors, considering that it has already entered the stock market. In September 2018, NIO issued 160 million shares for $6.26 a share, valuing the company at $ 6.4 billion at the moment (Zhang & Zhang, 2020). Since its start, the company has received approximately $ 1.5 billion in funding (Zhang & Zhang, 2020). Therefore, the company's insolvency can cause significant problems for investors and leave almost 6,000 employees unemployed.

The Ethics and Business Conduct of NIO

According to the NIO Inc. Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, the corporation follows the rules and regulations of its employees. In particular, the document indicates that the company’s operations comply with the laws of the country, regions, and towns in which it operates (NIO Inc. Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, 2018). These include laws regarding bribery and kickbacks, patents, copyrights, trademarks, and trade secrets, information confidentiality, insider trading, providing or accepting rewards, and workplace harassment.

Additionally, the corporation is subject to rules for environmental protection, health, safety, false or misleading financial information, misuse of corporate assets, and foreign exchange. NIO may be accused of giving false or misleading information if the company's IPO predictions do not come true. In addition to complying with rules, NIO ensures that neither employment nor the work process are subject to discrimination. The code also requires employees to treat customers, suppliers, rivals, and coworkers with fairness. Lastly, NIO pledges to provide a safe and healthy workplace for its employees.

Managerial Structure

Bin Li – Founder, Chairman, and Chief Executive Officer; Lihong Qin – Co-Founder, Director, and President; Hai Wu – Independent Director; Denny Ting Bang Li – Independent Director; and James Gordon Mitchell – Director serve on the board of directors (Board of directors, n.d.). Bing Li, Lihong Qin, Shen Feng, Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Quality Management Committee, Xin Zhou, Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Product Committee, Wei Feng, Chief Financial Officer, and Ganesh W. Yer, Managing Director of NIO USA and Global CIO, present the management. The corporation also underlines that NIO Inc.'s corporate governance strategy aims to protect shareholder interests and promote responsible business practices.

CEO's ancestry

William Li or Li Bin is a Chinese entrepreneur, founder, and chief executive officer of NIO, a producer of electric vehicles. It has offices in China, Hong Kong, the United States, Germany, and London. In February 2019, Forbes estimated Li's personal wealth to be $1.4 billion (#1717 William Li, 2020). Before creating NIO, Li co-founded a number of businesses and invested in the growth of over 40 Internet and automotive startups. William Li was born on a dairy farm in Anhui to a low-income family on August 9, 1974. The family began paying for William’s education as soon as he was accepted to school. He attended Peking University and earned a BA in Sociology and Law.

Bitauto Holdings Ltd. was the first major enterprise Li started. Li served as CEO and Chairman of the company from 2000 until 2013, when he sold it. Li acquired international renown after starting NIO in November 2014, as the company built premium vehicles for the enormous and lucrative Chinese market. Tencent, Temasek, Baidu, Lenovo, and TPG, among others, have invested in the company, and by 2016, NIO had more than $1 billion in investments. The company's first vehicle was the NIO EP9, which took 1.5 years to develop. In 2017, 10,000 automobiles were manufactured, followed by 14,000 in 2018; in 2019, the company planned to create 20,000 more automobiles. In addition, the business received an order for its first electric off-road vehicle in 2017 (#1717 William Li, 2020). Following its offering on the New York Stock Exchange, NIO has become an industry leader in the Chinese electric vehicle sector.

Forbes currently estimates Lee's net worth to be $ 3.4 billion. Also placed 1,717 on Forbes' 2019 list of billionaires, the entrepreneur fell off the list in 2020. Lee was ranked 249th on the 2018 China Rich List, but fell to 1717th in 2019 (William Li, 2020). William Li currently resides in Beijing and is a Chinese citizen. Since he created Bitauto Holdings Ltd, an online content supplier for the automobile sector, William Li has been referred to as "China's Elon Musk."

Conclusion

Thus, the legal and ethical difficulties NIO faces were explored, as well as the organization's management structure. In addition, the publication included a brief biography of NIO chief executive William Li. Despite the anticipated success, the company experienced funding challenges in 2019 as a result of a government policy that reduced subsidies for electric vehicles. Due to intense rivalry and a contracting market, the business will have difficult times. If it is declared bankrupt, NIO will face legal and ethical difficulties regarding its obligation to investors and workers.

References

#1717 William Li (2020). Web.

Committee of directors (n.d.). Web.

Markoch, C. (2019). NIO stock has a mathematical issue. Web-based Investor Place.

Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for NIO Inc. (2018). Web.

Zhang, G., & Zhang, M. (2020). As an example of innovations in new energy vehicles, NIO is a prime example. In 2020, the International Social and Human Sciences Conference (ICSHS2020) will be held (pp. 554-561). Shanghai, China: Shanghai University's School of Economics.

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Researching Of The Pechanga Casino Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Casino Overview History of the Pechanga Casino Inter Management Regulatory System Pechanga Casino and Resort Operations References

Introduction

Indeed, the American tradition is extremely rich. Not only is it a melting pot of cultures and traditions, but its socioeconomic development is the most diverse ever. The Pechanga Indian Reservation in Temecula, California is home to the state's largest casino ever constructed. It provides a highly intriguing ethnic history and evolution timeline. Now that it is a four-diamond resort that attracts millions of guests annually, the Pechanga Casino is a significant economic contribution to recruitment issue resolution. The Pechanga Casino has its own exceptional security and operational management, which enables the casino and resort to remain among the best in the United States. Therefore, this dissertation will demonstrate that the Pechanga Casino is a significant economic contribution to the state.

Casino Overview

Pechanga Resort and Casino is the largest resort in California, with 188,000 square feet and over 3000 slot machines. The casino has garnered widespread appeal and generates several million dollars annually; a portion of this revenue is invested in the growth of the surrounding communities. Up to 4,100 managers and professionals are employed at the Pechanga Casino and Resort. Not only do guests have the opportunity to relax and spend money at the slot machines on the gaming floor, but there is also a 522-room hotel that is exquisitely magnificent. There are over 130 table games, including the well-known Black Jack, Fortune Pai Gow Poker, and Pechanga Craps, among others (Valley, 2003).

The Pechanga Casino was established in 1995 as a 60,000-square-foot gambling area. However, with the passage of time, it has evolved into a massive 188,000-square-foot gaming floor with a total size of 200,000 square feet. In November of 2004, an extra 100,000 square feet of space was added to the initial 85,000 square feet. Later, a food court and a poker room with 54 tables were added. Not only have the proprietors given attention to the gaming space, but the entertainment and restaurants also have a significant impact on the number of tourists; so, a sports-themed restaurant was also opened in 2004. When the owners raised the minimum age to 21 from 18, heated disputes ensued, and many questioned if this would generate as much revenue as normal. Since then, though, the Pechanga Casino has prospered. In compared to Pala Casino's 100,000 square feet of gaming space, 507 hotel rooms, and 2,000 slot machines, the Pechanga Casino is visually and functionally superior.

The casino is filled with a variety of features designed to make guests feel completely at ease. The non-smoking zones have state-of-the-art filtering systems. There are restaurants, bars, a theater, golf courses, tours over Pechanga, a cabaret lounge, and a spa, among other amenities.

Pechanga Casino History

Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians initiated a $262 million complex that would become the Pechanga Casino and Resort. The hotel contained 522 rooms on 14 levels. There are 2,000 slot machines, and 63 blackjack card tables were purchased. Additionally, they possessed a bingo facility with 700 seats. In addition, they began as a business with 40,000 square feet of convention space, seven restaurants, and a ballroom. The Pechanga Resort and Casino encompasses over one million square feet and features the greatest gaming space and total size of any casino in the state of California.

Only in 2002 was the company able to employ 1,700 individuals. Currently, there are over 4000 employees.

The history of the casino's founding is fascinating and inspiring for many budding entrepreneurs. The initial difficulty in getting funds for the project is the cause. They required multiple attempts. In the end, it was the greatest financial transaction with an Indian country in California's history. They were lent $150 million, and they now spend approximately $33 million year and contribute to the local economy.

Inter Management

The Pechanga Band of Luiseno successfully owns and manages reservation casinos. The Indian tribe chairman had experience working for the community, so they chose to establish a resort and casino in southern California to improve the state's economic well-being. In the end, the Pechanga Resort and Casino became rich and prospering thanks to the Tribe's leadership in past companies.

They had expertise working with Riverside County and the local tribes to advocate for the communities' land ownership and economic development objectives. The Band Luiseno was a masterful mediator between the locals and the authorities in order to maintain mutually beneficial relationships and achieve the Tribe's economic prosperity.

Therefore, the tribe has been diligently implementing the views: they have boosted the share revenues for California tribes who have been receiving funds from the Revenue Sharing Trust Fund.

Since its opening ten years ago, Pechanga Casino has been a huge success. The casino has not only generated millions of dollars in profits for its owners, but it has also boosted the economies of the surrounding cities and the state of California. As long as it contributes to the state's budget and ensures the stability of Indian tribes, the Casino's positions will therefore remain relatively constant for many years to come.

Concerning the evolution of the casino, it must be stated that every casino, including Pechanga, has an inter-management staff structure whose chain connections will inevitably break in the future. Pit managers will become irreplaceable positions. With the advancement of technology and monitoring systems, pit managers will be gradually let go as their need diminishes.

Regulatory Structure

The Tribal-State Compact between the state of California and the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians stipulates that they may operate no more than two gambling establishments on their reservation. The Casino's authorized operations are conducted at 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula, California 92592, in addition to a single other location within the Indian territory specified by the Amended Compact. The Band Luiseno may utilize all legal forms of gambling, but only in accordance with IGRA, the Amended Compact, and the Tribe's Gaming Ordinance.

The casino may operate freely on the condition that it contributes $2,000,000 to the Revenue Sharing Trust Fund on a quarterly basis ($500,000) within one month of the end of each calendar quarter.

In an interesting twist, the regulatory issues are settled by the tribal council, whose organization is of particular importance. The Pechanga Tribe has a structure that closely resembles the power of the state. It is the minor government within the United States government, with 560 tribes around the nation and 100 tribes in California (Gover, 2011). They present nationally recognized authority that executes its control over reservation Indians and lands. The Pechanga Development Corporation's board of four directors serves as the tribal legislative (PDC). This entity assumed control of all tribal enterprises and the Pechanga Casino and Resort. The Gaming Commission gets its authority from the Tribal Gaming Ordinance of the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians (Act). This affords the tribe the ability to investigate misbehavior, monitor gaming operations, etc., while they maintain the peace on their territory.

Both Pechanga Casino and Pala Casino and Resort are operated by Native American tribes. However, the Pala Casino run by the Pala Band of Mission Indians is not as successful and did not receive as much initial investment.

Pechanga Casino, like Pala Casino, has spent heavily on the surveillance system. It must be technologically advanced to prevent incidents. In addition to purchasing the equipment, they spend thousands of dollars year to retain a skilled crew that operates this outlandish equipment. In addition, the Pechanga tribal government appears to have more people regulating casinos in general than does Pala Casino. As Class III-type gambling is presently evolving, they have modern, standardized equipment. In contrast to Pala Casino, Pechanga Casino has state-of-the-art electronic equipment.

Pechanga Resort and Casino Operations

There is a General Manager and ten Vice Presidents at the Pechanga Casino. The General Manager is accountable to and reports to the PDC. There are 10 operational functions whose chief executives must report to one of the vice presidents (Weiswasser, 2011). Pechanga has more than 4,000 employees, thus each department relies on a large number of individuals. For instance, the financial division has a Vice President of Finance and Chief Financial Officer, as well as a Director of Finance and a Controller. Therefore, the employee chain is sufficiently extended to allow workers to effectively carry out their obligations in accordance with knowledge management. The manager only values and appreciates the employee's duty, no matter what the employee does.

As the casino steadily evolved into a resort, the departments were undergoing fast change. When extra space and restaurants opened in 2004, the food and beverage operational functions department was established. Obviously, the oldest department is the financial department. Due to the expansive gaming floor and absence of a spa, theater, cabaret, etc., managing the casino's finances was the primary concern at the casino's inception. Security emerged simultaneously, although it is continuously redesigned and improved. The department of information technology is the youngest and newest department.

The evolving casino environment influences the development of new security trends. They take precautions deftly by employing cutting-edge techniques. The operational structure is efficient enough to preserve order and clarity in the casino's operations, allowing for the derivation of required conclusions regarding the casino's personnel. Moreover, as a result of this separation of labor tasks, every client requirement is explicitly addressed and swiftly responded to. Due to the expanded staff of employees/departments, there are different functions inside the resort's territory that any tourist can enjoy regardless of the diversity of his or her preferences.

Conclusion

Pechanga Casino and Resort's annual expenditures of $33 million can contribute significantly to the economies of the surrounding cities. The casino is the largest in Southern California and belongs to the hotel business. Having employed 4,000 people, the casino on the Indian reservation is vying for the title of lifesaver and economic contributor. Submitted to Pechanga Development Corporation, it has adequate tools to preserve peace and lawfulness on the casino gaming floor and throughout the reservation region.

References

Gover, K. (2011). Tribal Constitutionalism: States, Tribes, and Membership Governance. Oxford University Press, New York.

Valley, D. (2003). Indian Gaming in Southern California's Jackpot Trail San Diego: Sunbelt Publications.

Weiswasser, M. (2011). What Contains a Title? Finance Department. Human Capital, 15(1), 22-23.

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New Performance Management System For Multicultural Team Mba Essay Help

Introduction Context of the Research

Performance management is one of the concepts that are gaining popularity rapidly in contemporary businesses. According to Kirkman and Harris (2017), in the current competitive business environment, companies are doing everything possible to get a competitive advantage over their competitors. Increasing an individual employee's productivity is one of the most effective methods for demonstrating better performance.

It is essential to have a performance management system that focuses on each employee's ability to contribute value to the firm. The notion of performance management is now applicable to both for-profit and non-profit businesses. Government institutions, including schools, the court system, the health sector, and public works, play a crucial role in society.

The employees of these institutions have crucial responsibility to serve the general population. In the past, there was a big problem with government personnel purposefully underperforming since they knew there would be no severe consequences (Wang & Rafiq 2014). In these institutions, however, accountability and integrity are becoming increasingly important. There is always a desire to ensure that every assignment is finished within the allotted time and in the appropriate manner. The methodology has shifted from examining the overall performance of a department to focusing on single individuals.

When a business employs a workforce with diverse sociocultural backgrounds, performance management may become a serious challenge. Kirkman and Harris (2017) assert that technology has transformed the globe into a global village. Schools in Saudi Arabia are now able to hire teachers from the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, and other countries. When working with a multicultural team of employees, one must recognize that their values, attitudes, and societal beliefs differ. The work ethics of people from different places of the world vary considerably.

In other words, when introducing a new performance management system in such a diverse workplace, the first step would be to guarantee that all employees have a shared understanding of what optimal performance should be for their various departments (Wróblewski, 2017).

Despite their cultural uniqueness, they should have a shared objective for what must be accomplished within a given time frame.

It may also be required to ensure that they understand how to collaborate to achieve organizational goals.

Such an organization must begin by addressing the potential barriers that cultural differences may generate (Saunders & Lewis 2017)

.

The goal of this research is to investigate how a multicultural team reacts to a new performance management system. Possessing a diverse work environment may present a difficulty for management. Introducing a new approach to evaluate the performance of employees may be challenging, particularly if the team perceives that they are being subjected to excessive pressure.

Receiving a response from this team makes it feasible to comprehend their major problems and how the relevant authorities may handle them effectively (Salas, Rico & Passmore 2017). Oftentimes, their anxieties are based on inaccurate information that leads to erroneous conceptions of what they must accomplish. Using the new performance management system, it would be simple to lead the multicultural team to improved performance after these assumptions are corrected. The paper will present advice on how managers in today's competitive business world might approach a new performance management system in a multicultural firm.

Rationale for the Study

Diversity is a concern that businesses must address in the present business environment. Companies in Saudi Arabia are required to hire people from diverse backgrounds. When nationals of the host country and nationals of a third country coexist in the workplace, culture clashes are common. One group's religious beliefs and social behaviors may differ greatly from those of the other.

These sociocultural variables have a substantial impact on the work ethic of individuals (Mor-Barak 2014). It is also true that people have a tendency to evaluate work performance based on their background. It depends on how one was raised to perceive perfection and how it should be achieved. Some people assume that spending a great deal of time at work will boost their individual and organizational performance. Others feel that innovation and originality are necessary to achieve the desired performance.

According to Kirkman and Harris (2017), cultural diversity also influences a company's management strategies. Numerous people from Western Europe and North America support an open-door policy in which employees have the right and chance to express their opinions freely and even communicate with the company's top executives when necessary. The majority of people from the Far East, on the other hand, believe in rigid leadership in which the directives of the top management must be obeyed without exception.

When individuals with such disparate ideas on leadership are brought together in a specific organization, it becomes vital to harmonize their perspectives based on what the local dynamics demand. The issue occurs when managing such diversity in an organizational setting becomes difficult. Issues such as cultural intolerance can quickly deteriorate into severe problems inside an organization.

Local managers in such diverse firms will find it essential to investigate the response of a multicultural workforce to a new performance management system. As these companies continue to employ foreigners alongside nationals of the host country, they must determine whether and how to implement new systems (Yates, Lee & Wanna 2015). Change is inevitable, and the most crucial factor is understanding when and how to bring it in a manner that may generate resistance.

This paper's findings will assist in identifying some of the obstacles organizations experience when implementing transformation. Given that the study focuses on multicultural organizations, it is possible to identify the primary causes of fear of change among these workers. Fear of the unknown may cause people to create a negative attitude toward a new performance management system in most circumstances, even before they comprehend its goals (Colombo 2014). The document will assist managers in comprehending how to deal with such issues in an efficient and timely manner whenever it is important to implement change. It will help to reduce employee resistance by outlining the systematic procedures that must be performed to attain the intended results.

Objectives and Aims of the Study

It is essential to establish the purpose of a study to determine what must be accomplished (Bryman & Bell 2015). This paper aims to determine how a multinational team reacts to a new performance management system. The inquiry focuses on the elements that characterize such a team's perspective of performance management systems, the problems that may be encountered while introducing such new systems, and the manner in which a new performance management system should be implemented in a diverse organization. The study should accomplish the following precise objectives.

Determine the factors that influence employees' perceptions of a new performance management system; To identify obstacles that may arise when adopting a new system into a diverse workplace setting; To comprehend the special concerns that a multiracial team of employees may have when a new system must be implemented. Determine how the management unit may implement a new performance management system without encountering major employee pushback.

Research Problem

The research will utilize both primary and secondary data sources to meet the stated purpose and objectives. Kirkman and Harris (2017) show that developing research questions assists in the process of data collection. The questions should reflect the study's aims. They assist in determining the specific facts that must be acquired from the field to fulfill the paper's requirements. The following are the specific questions that guided the data collection procedure.

What difficulties arise when bringing a new system into a diverse workplace environment?

What elements determine the attitude of employees toward a new performance management system?

What are the precise reasons why employees frequently resist organizational change? How can the management unit implement a new performance management system without encountering major employee opposition?

Organization of the Paper

The report contains five chapters. The introduction constitutes the first chapter. It describes the study's context and justification for undertaking the investigation. In addition, it describes the purpose of the study, research objectives, and questions that led data collection. The second chapter is a review of the literature. It provides a thorough analysis of the facts discovered by other scholars in this topic.

Through the review, it was feasible to identify the information gaps that this and other studies will need to fill. The third chapter is the part on methodology. It describes how data were obtained from participants, evaluated, and presented in a relevant manner. In addition, it describes the primary assumptions established during data collection, the ethical issues observed, and the practical limits with which the researcher had to contend with conducting this study. The fourth chapter is a comprehensive examination of the participant-collected primary data.

This section contains the responses to the questions posed to participants. The conclusion and recommendations based on the data obtained from both primary and secondary sources are presented in the fourth chapter. In addition, the study's ramifications are discussed in this chapter. An abstract and a proclamation precede the initial chapter.

Literature Review

Managing the performance of individual employees in a multicultural culture is essential to achieving the required level of organizational success. In this chapter, the researcher will summarize the findings of previous experts on this topic. According to Azanza, Moriano, and Molero (2013), it is prudent to avoid repeating knowledge already available through the work of other researchers when undertaking research.

Instead, it is vital to analyze the findings of others in order to identify and address research gaps. The focus of a new report should be on the gray regions of a particular issue in order to further knowledge in a specific profession. Performance management is a well-researched area since companies fight to ensure that they are improving as a means of boosting their performance. The increased migration of workers from one country to another is also making the concept of workplace diversity increasingly relevant. This chapter will examine workplace diversity management strategies, the concept of performance management systems, and research gaps.

Employee Diversity Understanding the Concept of Workplace Diversity

Different researchers have characterized diversity in the workplace in different ways, but in ways that convey a similar meaning. Baack, Harris, and Baack (2013) assert that "diverse workplaces consist of employees with varying characteristics, including but not limited to religious and political beliefs, gender, ethnicity, education, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, and geographic location" (p. 78).

When discussing workplace diversity, race is sometimes the only topic that comes up significantly. However, this is only one component of variety, as the preceding definition indicates. The management of a specific organization cannot disregard the significance of race as a component. Movement of labor from one country to another is one of the primary contributors to the racial diversity of an organization's workforce.

Constant immigration has resulted in a highly diverse workforce in the affluent nations of the west, particularly in North America and Europe (Ballantyne & Packer 2013). People from Africa and portions of Asia are migrating to these nations in pursuit of better prospects.

In Middle Eastern nations such as Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates, the burgeoning petroleum and real estate sectors attract people. The more a society continues to accept immigrants, the greater the pressure on businesses to embrace racial diversity (Bratton & Gold 2017). Companies that have successfully embraced racial diversity have demonstrated greater success than those that avoid recruiting foreigners.

Clinard (2015) says that some of these foreigners are more educated and knowledgeable than the natives. They migrate to the country because they believe they would earn more money there. Campbell and Goritz (2014) found that the majority of foreigners in the Middle East tend to be more hardworking than the majority of natives. They can even take incomes that are lower than those of the locals. Employing them may be one of the steps a company must take to ensure that its workforce is lean and highly productive.

Religious Variation

Religious diversity is another key subject that cannot be neglected when examining workplace diversity. According to Chin and Trimble (2014), it is nearly difficult to avoid religious diversity in an organization due to the physical movement of people. A Muslim or Christian who relocates to a new country in search of better employment possibilities is less likely to alter their personal beliefs and practices.

It implies that a Muslim who relocates to London for employment reasons will maintain his or her religious beliefs. In most instances, a person's religious beliefs may not have a substantial impact on his or her working performance (Bratton & Gold 2017). However, in some instances it may be vital to comprehend how such ideas may impact their workplace routine. For example, Christians may choose not to work on Sundays, which is their official day of prayer, but Muslims may prefer not to work on Fridays. In some instances, it becomes problematic when management is unable to designate the official day when employees should not report to work due to religious obligations.

Clark (2013) explains that countries with a predominately Muslim population prioritize Islam. Conversely, when Christians constitute the majority of the population, Sundays are likely to be official days of worship. It may be vital to discover a way to strike a delicate balance between religion and the urge to be at work in order to keep employees engaged. Successful businesses that have embraced religious diversity have devised novel means to achieve this difficult balancing act (Dawson & Andriopoulos 2014). They provide employees with the option to select the day they believe they must fulfill their religious obligations.

Instead of looking at diversity as a challenge, it becomes a firm’s strength because every single day of the week, there will be employees at the firm able

Merchandizing Strategies Wet Seal Case Study Mba Essay Help

Table of Contents
Product Pricing Location Product Promotion Product Selection Marketing concentration

Wet Seal differentiates out as a retailer that caters to youthful, fashion-conscious women. It targets adolescent and middle-aged women who are not only interested in fashion but also care about their image, which is reflected by what they wear. Its primary customers are fashion enthusiasts, those who prefer to shop frequently, and those who can shop both in-person and online. In reality, its brand characteristics are tailored to fulfill the needs of girls who enjoy having fun.

In addition to targeting fashion-conscious females, Wet Seal also satisfies the needs of budget-conscious girls. In essence, the business caters to tech-savvy, fashion-obsessed young women. In contrast, Wet Seal has a sister store called Arden B. The sister business caters to ladies between the ages of 21 and 39. This is a group of women who are not only fashion-conscious, but also eager to keep up with developing trends and constantly update their wardrobes. To address the needs of this dynamic market, a properly considered and planned product mix is required.

Wet Seal's desire to redefine itself as a fashion hub necessitates the adoption of operating techniques that will restore its growth and promote its long-term success. Major focuses include delivery of quality products at affordable prices, understanding and appropriately responding to market trends, driving traffic through disruptive marketing and visual merchandising, creating a relevant platform for social media outreach, reaching out to the market via popular media such as music, and leveraging online presence to not only drive sales but also deliver real-time messages to prospective customers (Borden 286). In actuality, Wet Seal's product mix should take into account every essential attribute of the target market.

Product

Wet Seal's product portfolio must represent its target mix. Fashion and trend must take precedence. Girls, and particularly young girls, are customarily fashion-conscious. In addition to seeming intelligent, a modern woman would also like to be considered fashion-compliant. Women between the ages of 21 and 39 are already financially independent and desire to frequently update their wardrobes. Logic dictates that they would not want to update their wardrobe with previously acquired items. Therefore, it is essential to always restock with the latest fashion clothing.

Pricing

Price is an essential consideration for the intended market (Banting and Ross 232). Despite the fact that a significant section of the target market is already employed, these customers are frugal and so have spending control. Consequently, it is essential that the prices of the items be average in order to meet the needs of the intended market. In addition, the majority of adolescents are still dependent on their parents due to their lack of employment. Few parents can afford to spend freely, therefore clothing would be reasonably priced. Therefore, the corporation should adopt a fair pricing approach.

Place

The target market consists of customers who can buy in malls and online. Therefore, the marketing strategy should employ both traditional and online marketing platforms (Brian 202). The newest fashions should be strategically displayed at malls to attract shoppers' attention. Increasing online advertising should also take into account that the intended market comprises internet users. Specifically, the target market has a strong presence on social networks; hence, a great deal of marketing efforts should be put in this direction.

Promotion

This is an essential component of marketing. The target market consists of clients who are interested in the promoted products (Kotler 112). Media such as music and social media platforms such as Facebook, Whatsapp, and Twitter are excellent venues for ads. Noting that Wet Seal's biggest competitors, including American Eagle Outfitters Inc., Forever 21 Inc., and the Gap Inc., already enjoy internet sales, it is necessary to engage extensively in this segment.

Merchandise

The business divisions of Wet Seal and Arden B enjoy a strong brand position. Wet Seal concentrates on satisfying the fashion needs of two distinct customer demographics, teen girls and middle-aged women, as opposed to other clothing retailers that offer a variety of products. This is accomplished by use of the Wet Seal and Arden B brands. In addition to adopting merchandise strategies that match their diverse fashion needs, the firm brands have developed a tight relationship with their customers. Therefore, the business divisions offer fashionable garments and accessories at reasonable pricing.

Wet Seal is applicable to the merchandising model of providing fashionable items at reasonable pricing. The business involves the identification, stocking, and selling of a broad selection of affordable contemporary and attractive apparel and accessories. The approach also entails collaborating with clients to guarantee successful product selection, promotion, and price. A substantial amount of the merchandise should be sourced domestically, reflecting the needs of the local market. In addition, this sourcing method will let the distribution of goods more often. The strategy will also include occasional markdowns to enable slow-moving inventory to sell quickly and ease regular restocking (Jerome 37).

Variety of merchandise

Summer will soon arrive. Typically, one would anticipate that customers will seek out apparel that offers both comfort and a beautiful appearance. It is recommended that Wet Seal stock jeans, leggings, and jackets for this reason. In the event of cold, a vast selection of tops will be available, as they will be concealed by jackets. Some suggested collections are displayed below:

Figure 1: Jeans.

These jeans will make you appear fashionable and stylish.

Figure 2: Leggings.

Like jeans, leggings protect the legs from summer heat by covering them. In contrast to jeans, which are bulky and may result in discomfort, leggings are lightweight and more comfortable.

Figure 3: Tops.

The tops can be layered with jackets or worn as desired. The cost of the tops ranges from $15 and $25.

Figure 4: Jackets.

The provided selection of coats allows teenagers and middle-aged ladies to maintain a fashionable appearance while protecting them from the winter cold. The coats are priced between $25 to $40, making them affordable for the target population.

Figure 5: Boots.

Winter boots are the suggested footwear due to their affordability and compatibility with winter conditions. The price ranges from $32 to $36, making it affordable for middle-aged ladies and adolescents alike.

In addition to the specified selection of apparel, it is suggested that more close-toed shoes be provided in preparation for the winter season. In cold and wet seasons, closed shoes are recommended over open shoes, which expose the wearer to many cold weather effects, such as mud and cold. Boots will be more suitable.

Marketing emphasis

Marketing is really important. The idea presented is to promote apparel based on the approaching season. This will include social media marketing initiatives in addition to television advertisements. The objective is to provide as much visual exposition of the varied apparel as is practicable. The emphasis should be placed on both middle-aged women and adolescents. The majority of middle-aged women who are already employed or in college will be looking forward to updating their summer wardrobes, whilst the majority of youngsters will have just begun their summer vacations and will be in search of summer-appropriate attire.

It is vital to highlight, however, that the target market is cost-conscious; hence, the summer market will be founded on the tenet that excellent apparel can be purchased at reasonable prices. Social marketing will mostly consist of publishing photographs and information about the apparel on social media, along with links to the Wet Seals and Arden B websites. As a matter of fact, this will involve a large number of infographics that display the items as fashion- and trend-appropriate while also emphasizing their suitability for the following season. The clothing brand currently constituted will be promoted largely as an economical summer apparel line that adheres to rising patterns and trends. Moreover, direct emails should be explored when they are available.

Sources Cited

Peter Banting and Randall Ross, "Choosing the Right Product Mix," Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, volume 1, issue 1 (2010), pages 231-234.

The Concept of the Marketing Mix, by Neil Borden. p. 286. New York: Wiley, 2009.

Engage: The Comprehensive Guide for Brands and Businesses to Create, Cultivate, and Measure Success in the New Web, by Brian Solis. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Washington, DC, 2011, pages 201-202.

Jerome and McCarthy Marketing Fundamentals: A Managerial Approach. London: Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 2010, p.37.

Kotler, Keller. Marketing and Management. Upper Saddle River: Pearson Prentice Hall. 2008. p. 112.

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Supply Chain Risks And Interdependencies Mba Essay Help

Impact of supply chain risks and interdependencies on the implementation of the supply chain strategy

Sustainability of supply chains is a top priority for all businesses. Numerous elements, including environmental consequences in supply chains, operational concerns, business models and strategies applicable to each organization, and social dimensions of sustainable supply chains, must be considered (Bouchery 6). However, there is a factor that is equally as important as sustainability. A management must examine supply chain risks and interdependencies to ensure the chain's effective operation. A supply chain management must have the ability to model the emergence of risks (Khojasteh 44).

McDonald’s is the corporation being analyzed. The corporation operates over 35,000 eateries but does not produce the necessary products (Jones). Therefore, a large and effective supply chain is required to consistently provide all restaurants with ingredients. McDonald&amp

Due to the need to service about 70 million customers every day, consistency is one of the key problems of the company's supply chain (Jones). Therefore, predicting supply chain risks is essential for assessing their impact on the supply chain strategy implementation of a business. In addition, interdependencies between supply chain components should be taken into account when preparing for potential difficulties. Commodities such as cattle, poultry, coffee, and oils pose the greatest sustainability threats to McDonald’s (McDonald’s. Prioritizing Resources and Concentrating Efforts). Therefore, McDonald's supply chain is highly dependent on suppliers.

In addition, its components are interrelated, as delays in the delivery of one product might affect other processes. The structure of McDonald's supply chain is the key to its long-term viability (Sharma 112). In the majority of nations with McDonald's restaurants, the whole supply chain network is outsourced. In addition, the company's supply chain is multilayered. In India, for instance, Tier-1 and Tier-2 vendors produce distinct sorts of products. Tier-I consists of the largest suppliers of processed goods, whereas Tier-2 consists of growers and manufacturers of fresh components.

Consequently, if supply chain risks are underestimated, the entire supply chain will suffer. As for interdependence, it might become a supply chain weak spot. McDonald’s, according to Sharma (118), does not sign legal contracts with its suppliers and prefers a "handshake relationship" model. To avoid the risk factor, the corporation expects its suppliers to personally guarantee the quality of their products (Sharma 118). Therefore, if one of the suppliers delivers a lower-quality product or fails to deliver it at all, the company's supply chain strategy is at danger. However, another aspect of this strategy that adheres to the one-product-one-supplier philosophy protects the company against large losses in the event that the supply chain is disrupted due to an irresponsible partner.

Furthermore, it should be noted that research demonstrates that supply chain risk management has an effect on robustness and agility, which are major aspects in the enhancement of overall performance (Wieland and Wallenburg 888). It has been demonstrated that agility effects the customer value of the supply chain favorably, whereas robustness is related to company performance. Therefore, it is essential to establish a supply chain that incorporates both elements. Due to its equal emphasis on customer value and business performance, the company's supply chain under examination is structured to facilitate effective risk management.

Overall, it can be determined that McDonald's supply chain is resistant to a variety of threats. Despite the high interconnectedness and potential fragility of the supply chain parts, the corporation successfully manages the chain. The effective performance and sustainability of the company's supply chain are supported by the company's careful selection of suppliers, long-term collaborations, and ties built on mutual trust and respect.

Strategic fit between competitive strategy and supply chain strategy's contribution to the enhancement of customer value

Strategic fit requires that a company's competitive and supply chain strategies have aligned objectives. It relates to the 'consistency between the customer goals that the competitive strategy intends to meet and the supply chain capabilities that the supply chain strategy intends to develop' (Chopra and Meindl 21). Every organization that wishes to attain strategic fit must possess certain components. These components include a coordinated overall strategy comprised of the competitive strategy and all functional strategies, the structured nature of resources and processes that contribute to the execution of the company's strategies, and the design of the global supply chain so that each of its elements can support the strategy.

To evaluate strategic fit, the Dell corporation's development process and supply chain from 1993 to the present might be studied. Between 1993 and 2006, Dell created a competitive strategy that includes offering an extensive selection of "customizable products at reasonable prices" (Chopra and Meindl 22). Dell established a supply chain that was responsive and centered on customisation. Dell's facilities were adaptable and flexible in order to accommodate the diversified needs of clients wanting different product combinations. The selection of this sort of facility was appropriate because the facility offering identical products at a cheaper price would not have been suitable under these conditions.

The issue of strategic fit is also evident in a number of other Dell Corporation operations. Therefore, the design of Dell's personal computers was intended to facilitate a rapid assembly process by utilizing common components (Chopra and Meindl 22). Since the company's primary objective was to construct customized PCs to meet client requirements, the chosen technique helped to the attainment of this objective and, consequently, to customer satisfaction.

With this strategy, Dell faced an additional supplier-related problem. Due to the fact that Dell was aiming to supply customized products “with minimal amounts of inventory,” the company need suppliers that were quick, dependable, and in line with its business plan. For instance, the compatibility of Dell computers with Sony displays reduced the need to stock monitors to make them compatible with PCs (Chopra and Meindl 22). This approach existed until 2006 and was responsible for Dell's sustainable growth.

Nonetheless, the company's competitive approach shifted in 2007. Therefore, it was important to modify the supply chain to accommodate the new approach. This time, less emphasis was placed on hardware customization by customers. In addition, Dell began selling its personal computers through retail outlets like Walmart (Chopra and Meindl 22). In these retail locations, the company offered a restricted selection of PCs and laptops.

To prevent customers from having to wait if they wanted to buy a computer at Walmart, however, other crucial components like displays were also in stock. Thus, the flexibility and responsiveness of the supply chain that “aligns well with consumer desires for customisation” may not be particularly effective if customers value cheaper pricing over the benefits of customization (Chopra and Meindl 22). In order to maintain its strategic fit, Dell had to move its focus from production to a build-to-stock approach.

Currently, Dell's competitors, such as contract manufacturers, focus on low-cost now production and advance production. To maintain its strategic fit in a competitive market, Dell shifted its supply chain strategy from "responsiveness to a greater emphasis on low cost" (Chopra and Meindl 22).

In order for the organization to achieve a strategic fit between its supply chain and competitive strategies, it must take certain measures. Keep in mind that a company's ability to fulfill a particular target audience or customer group will be determined by its competitive strategy. Thus, in order to achieve strategic alignment, a company must build a supply chain capable of meeting the needs of the target market.

The strategic fit can be attained if a business completes three crucial phases. Initially, the organization must comprehend "the customer and supply chain uncertainty" (Chopra and Meindl 22). It implies that a company entering the market and building its supply chain strategy must consider the needs of each target market segment. In addition, the impact of this uncertainty on the supply chain should be assessed.

This process and the recognition of the customer's wants are beneficial for defining the intended cost and planning service requirements. In addition, it is essential to recognize that customers' expectations can be unpredictable, which necessitates preparing the supply chain to respond to such unpredictability. Second, the organization must comprehend the capabilities of the supply chain. It is important to keep in mind that there are numerous sorts of supply chains developed for varied purposes. Moreover, the type of supply chain that is effective for one organization may be ineffective for another. Thirdly, if there are major disparities between the supply chain's strengths and customer wants, it may be necessary to modify the supply chain structure to support the competitive strategy or the strategy to achieve strategic fit (Chopra and Meindl 22).

In general, the strategic fit between a company's competitive strategy and supply chain strategy is essential for market success. It is difficult to attain and requires careful consideration of priorities. Companies must choose between increased competitiveness due to lower pricing and a focus on customer value and product customisation to fulfill client wants. Nonetheless, the appropriate balance between these factors gives opportunity for the successful operation of the organization. In addition, a company's competitive strategy and supply chain strategy must be agile and adaptable to fluctuating market conditions and variable client needs in order to ensure its ongoing growth.

Influence of network architecture on supply chain effectiveness

The design of a network has a considerable impact on the efficiency of a supply chain. The selection of such a design necessitates deliberation to ensure the future efficacy of the network (Ivanov et al. 141). Therefore, it is essential to choose an ideal site for the chain's facilities. In the event that the location was not picked appropriately, logistics issues may arise that hinder the operation of the supply chain. Consequently, it is vital to assess all location-related chain phases and select the most appropriate ones (Ivanov et al. 142). Appropriate answers may need the use of computational approaches. For instance, it is required to calculate the configuration options for warehouses in order to make them readily accessible. This strategy can help to cut future transportation expenses.

Hanne and Dornberger (121) concur that thorough location planning is essential for supply chain performance achievement. The writers emphasize the need of examining the location's proximity to suppliers and consumers, the availability of resources and labor in the area, local regulations and taxation, and the overall infrastructure. All of these factors are expected to have distinct effects on supply chain performance. Long distances to suppliers or customers, for instance, will increase transportation costs. In addition to a shortage of resources or trained workers, the necessity of their supply to the region also drives up their expenses. The peculiarities of the area's taxation or other legislation can hinder construction or certain sectors.

The network should be designed to make the supply chain competitive in the context of the modern, dynamic economy (Farahani 92). Different supply chain network architectures can be effective in various contexts. Therefore, it is vital to focus on the design of the supply chain in order to maximize the effectiveness of the entire chain and contribute to its performance and competitiveness.

Several views should be addressed during network design development. It is a theoretical perspective initially. The network design influences the form of the supply chain and involves investment pattern-influencing decisions. Moreover, these decisions impact the supply chain's prospects and the difficulties that can or cannot be addressed. Consequently, it is vital to analyze the network's capability, its information component, the key competencies, and the material and human resources. The material must pass via the supplier network, the firm itself, and the distribution network before reaching its intended clients.

All of these networks constitute a worldwide supply chain that supplies clients with the essential goods and services. It is also essential to select the framework that will serve as the base for the network design. It is advantageous if this framework is supported by research. This method can guarantee the successful operation of a supply chain whose network architecture is based on research. Research enables us to evaluate the potential benefits and difficulties of various supply chain sites and to forecast their future development.

In general, network architecture has a direct effect on supply chain performance. It effects the competitiveness of the final product by determining the cost-effectiveness of the supply chain. Therefore, the selection of network architecture should be one of the most important phases of supply chain development.

Sources Cited

Yann Bouchery et al., Sustainable Supply Chains. A textbook on operations and strategy based on research. Springer, 2017.

Chopra, Sunil, and Peter Meindl. Strategy, Planning, and Operation of Supply Chain Management 2015 by Pearson

Competitive Supply Chain Network Design: An Overview Of Classifications, Models, Solution Methodologies, And Applications.

” Omega, vol 45, 2014, pp. 92-118.

Thomas, Hanne, and Rolf Dornberger Intelligent Computation in Logistics and Supply Chain Management. Springer, 2017.

Springer, 2017. Ivanov, Dmitry, et al., Global Supply Chain and Operations Management.

Jones, Adam. "Must-Know: McDonald's Supply Chain." Market Realist (website).

Khojasteh, Yacob. Risk Management in the Supply Chain Innovative instruments, models, and innovations. Springer, 2017.

“McDonalds. Concentrating Resources and Efforts Where They Are Most Important Supply Risk, 2017. Internet.

A Case Study of the McDonald's Supply Chain in India,' by Kshitiz Sharma.

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing & Management Review, volume 2, issue 1 (January 2013), pages 112-120.

Andreas Wieland and Carl Marcus Wallenburg Dealing with Supply Chain Dangers. ” International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 42, no. 10, 2012, pp. 887-905.

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