The Bank Of America: Case Study Buy Essay Help

Introduction

During the 2007-2008 financial crisis, the Bank of America's actions and strategic decisions raised various questions over whether the Bank's board appropriately handled capital and acquisitions. The issue is that, during the crisis, the Bank undertook multiple investigations that revealed fraud in acquisitions, rendering some strategic decisions inadequate and detrimental to the interests of stakeholders. As a result, new management was chosen to fix the outstanding issues and establish the most advanced risk management and control systems to prevent a recurrence of the crisis-related errors. Due to the significance of fast financial recovery, the Bank of America was on the verge of implementing significant change interventions; yet, the answers for these problems are not readily apparent.

Concerns and Problems

The fundamental problem for the Bank is that, during the financial crisis, it invested cash in acquisitions that were not only impractical but also financially ruinous. Moreover, the most recent acquisitions led to management corruption, as several senior executives received huge payment bonuses despite their organizations' and the Bank's poor performance (Rothaermel & Burt, 2012). As a result, the Bank of America lost about $40 billion on such acquisitions, infuriating stakeholders who had invested in the company.

Moreover, the problem with exaggerated compensation packages and bonuses for top executives remained unaltered, as CEOs and senior managers continued to be paid astronomical sums for their actions even during financial losses. In this instance, the Bank chose to reevaluate and modify the bonuses and benefits for CEOs not just because of performance difficulties, but also because of pressure from the government and shareholders.

SWOT Analysis

Strengths

The Bank's notable characteristics include its ability to invest in lucrative institutions and businesses. This purchase approach contributed to the Bank's growth margins and capital gains. Prior to the financial crisis of 2007-2008, the Bank was the dominant financial institution with subsidiaries, investments, and global resources (Rothaermel & Burt, 2012). The new strategy adopts this approach and heavily relies on the Bank's capabilities and prospects to generate profits regardless of the circumstances.

Weaknesses

The Bank's problem is equivalent to that of any huge organization, as CEO compensation packages are massive and unsupported by any performance benchmarks or achievements. Consequently, the Bank allocates substantial funds for benefits and salaries, regardless of the institution's performance or financial health (Rothaermel & Burt, 2012). A further issue within the Bank is that the CEOs are less willing to alter the status quo due to the direct impact of Board initiatives on their salary and wellbeing. In this instance, the inflexibility of decisions makes any modifications difficult, which delays the achievement of quality results in the organization's operations and performance.

Opportunities

Investigations undertaken after the 2007-2008 financial crisis revealed to the Bank of America various problematic areas that must be addressed to improve the organization's financial health. In this instance, the Bank has the potential to integrate the performance-based reward structure for executive leadership (Rothaermel & Burt, 2012). Consequently, stakeholders will gain a tool for evaluating and controlling the benefits and pay of CEOs.

In addition, the second opportunity is based on the new evaluation techniques and models produced for the examination of the external market. The crisis has demonstrated that any purchase necessitates a broader and more in-depth examination and strategy for the Bank's market activities to be profitable. The Bank of America can be a pioneer in the sector and develop a strong model for investment analysis in times of economic stability and catastrophe.

Threats

Lack of flexibility in the decision-making process poses the greatest threat to the company. Consequently, the Bank can repeat its failures and endure additional inquiries and economic devastations (Rothaermel & Burt, 2012). The most recent purchase should be advantageous and accepted by shareholders, but failures or poor decisions will result in management changes or the collapse of the bank.

Recommendations

HYIP is an abbreviation for "High yield investment programs," or high-yield investment programs. Investing in a HYIP is not a guarantee of profits, but it does mean that profits can be substantial. Earning in HYIPs is simple, but slow. However, HYIP earnings might be hundreds of times more than the initial investment. Therefore, a bank with a given amount can generate both a profit and a surplus. HYIPs do not offer such guarantees. However, the benefit is numerous times greater than the “start-up capital,” not to mention any interest on the deposit. Here, the Bank can earn hundreds from a $10 conditional deposit.

There are various options for investing in HYIPs:

Long-term HYIP — up to 15% per month. Convenient for individuals who favor a steady, albeit modest, income. Medium HYIP — between 16% and 60% per month. For individuals who enjoy taking chances. These funds are significantly more prevalent than first-class funds. Attract clients with high interest rates and potential dangers. Typically, second-rate investments are financial pyramid schemes. And if a person discovers himself at the beginning of the pyramid's development and quits it in time, he or she can make a substantial profit. Rapid HYIP – up to 60% per month. This option is only appropriate for program organizers and not for participants. Participants who engage in Fast HYIP will receive neither interest nor initial capital. It is essential to research the ratings of HYIP firms to avoid losing money. And if the fund is on a blacklist, working with it is not necessary.

Long HYIP is recommended since the bank can acquire funds and begin a lengthy program to retain clients within the system. Moreover, the Long HYIP entails lower risks and losses for all parties, allowing the Bank to generate cash in the shortest feasible time while delaying interest payments for one or two years. In this instance, the Bank is given time to improve its profitability and financial health in order to meet its obligations to clients and HYIP investors.

References

Rothaermel, F. T., and C. Burt (2012). The 2010 Bank of America and the New Financial Landscape 1–26 in Harvard Business Review. Website of McGraw-Hill Education.

[supanova question]

Heineken Company Analysis Case Study Buy Essay Help

Gerard Heineken founded Heineken N.V. in Amsterdam, Holland, in 1864. Heineken N.V. is a brewing corporation with a global presence in several regions (Heineken). With over 165 breweries manufacturing over 300 brands of speciality beers and ciders, the corporation operates in 190 countries in Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the Americas, and Asia-Pacific (Heineken). Heineken employs 85,000 people worldwide, and this number is anticipated to rise in the future years as the company expands abroad.

The company's leadership is comprised of seasoned executives with various backgrounds and unparalleled competence in their respective major operation areas. Since 2005, Jean-Francois van Boxmeer has served as chief executive officer (Heineken). It is the responsibility of the Executive Board, which is appointed at the annual general meeting, to manage the company's business. This board consists of the current CEO as chairman and the company's CFO, Laurence Debroux.

The Executive Team consists of eight people, including four regional presidents, two members of the Executive Board, and four Chief Officers (Heineken). Two Executive Directors and 10 Supervisory Board members complete the company's leadership structure. The objective of Heineken is to become a proud, independent, worldwide brewer intent on surprise and thrilling its consumers. Its objective is for the Heineken brand to dominate all markets.

Analysis

SWOT Analysis

Strengths Weaknesses

Solid financial standing Extensive asset base Solid distribution system with outlets in 190 nations Low cost structure — permits low product pricing. diversified products with more than 300 brands Trademarks and patents are forms of intellectual property. Strategic alliances with wholesalers, manufacturers, and other stakeholders Mergers and acquisitions

Reduced expenditures on research and development High day sales inventory – adds unjustified costs to the business Lack of labor diversity insufficient market research Decision-making influenced by family (it is a family business) High staff turnover Low current asset to current liability ratios Extreme centralization of decision-making Poor margins monetary fluctuation

Opportunities and dangers

E-commerce – the corporation could increase revenues by capitalizing on the Internet's expansion. Using social media to build brand awareness Expanding beer and cider market in underdeveloped nations Technology can be utilized to streamline operations. Emerging specialized markets Government assistance for environmentally responsible products

Example: combination of Anheuser-Busch and Sab Miller High supplier bargaining strength New entrants Political uncertainties International interest rate fluctuations Altering client preferences Regulatory shifts in international marketplaces The availability of alternative products

PESTEL Analysis

Political variables

As a global brand, Heineken is subject to varying tax laws in each country in which it operates. Governments in emerging nations promote and support foreign investment. Different nations have stringent sales and advertising restrictions on alcoholic beverages.

Economic factors

The beer sector is crowded with large companies claiming a substantial market share. The prospect of new competitors Unbalanced demand and supply in various nations Strong competition from industry participants threat of economic downturn

Social aspects

Religious opposition to drinking alcohol Alcohol intake is related with health risks Human capital development is required in various nations. Trainings should be conducted to boost resource knowledge.

Technological variables

Technological innovation to optimize operations The chance to optimize the brewing process through technological advancement Utilizing technology to reduce expenses of operation and distribution

Environmental factors

The requirement to implement environmentally responsible corporate practices The need to safeguard the environment

Legal factors

Intellectual property rights must be legally protected. Contractual arrangements differ from nation to nation. Legal aspects of campaigns against excessive drinking, drunk driving, and drinking age limits Increased alcohol taxes to discourage consumption

Recommendations

Heineken should consider the multiple proposals to increase its market share and maintain its worldwide competitiveness. It should use the Internet to accelerate its e-commerce presence and social media to build brand recognition in both established and growing regions. In addition, it should extend its market share in various regions of the world through mergers and acquisitions. In addition to utilizing innovation to make eco-friendly products to attract environmentally conscious consumers, the company should manufacture nutritious beverages to appeal to the niche market of health-conscious consumers.

To increase competitiveness, the company must build on its robust distribution network to outcompete new entrants and major brands and employ technology and innovation to cut production costs, resulting in cheap product prices. Additionally, it must engage in research and development and market research, and provide incentives and other perks to lower turnover rates. Implementing these ideas will allow the organization to accomplish its mission goals.

Conclusion

Heineken is an established beer and cider brand that has been in existence since 1864, when it was founded in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Under the supervision of its current CEO, Jean-Francois van Boxmeer, the company has a presence in more than 170 countries and produces over 300 brands of specialty beers and ciders. At the top of its leadership structure is an Executive Board, followed by an eight-member Executive Team.

Executive Directors and a ten-member Supervisory Board round out the company's executive structure. This article discusses Heineken's numerous strengths, flaws, opportunities, and dangers. In addition, the PESTEL analysis illustrates the numerous political, economic, social, technological, environmental, and legal variables that influence the worldwide operations of the company.

Notes cited

Heineken is the most international brewer in the world. Heineken Company, 2020. Web.

[supanova question]

Sharp Corporation: Global Strategy Buy Essay Help

Introduction

Sharp Corporation is regarded as one of the electronics industry's mainstays. It began in 1912 with a mechanical pencil called Ever Sharp. Since then, the business has grown its global knowledge and innovation. Currently, Sharp is one of the most successful electronic companies. Its semiconductors division is one of the 20 largest in terms of revenue. Sharp commits sufficient resources for research & development as part of its commitment to innovation (RD). Its RD spending is one of the largest in the Top 100 countries worldwide.

The company's net sales surpassed $26 billion in 2007. Since 2003, the company's annual sales have increased. About half of Sharp's approximately 46,000 employees are located in Japan. The company has 64 established locations in 30 different countries. Sharp products are sold in more than 130 countries. Sharp has one of the most extensive ranges of markets served. Sharp Corporation has one of the industry's most esteemed reputations. Its product lines are wide and satisfy the majority of the market's electronic requirements.

Sharp Corporation's success is due to its emphasis on strategies. The company is regarded as one of the most methodical in terms of planning. Sharp appreciates the importance of strategy mapping, particularly in global marketplaces. The subsequent debate will center on the company's global strategy. It will describe the internal factors that influence Sharp's performance. Additionally, the external features of Sharp will be addressed.

Global Strategy

Sharp's goods vary from electrical components to major consumer electronics. It is noted for producing innovations that cannot be replicated. Sharp Corporation has so maintained its position as a market leader. The company's global strategy is segmented into various sub-strategies. These include product creation, marketing, and the protection of intellectual property. In addition, Sharp Corporation has a defined innovation strategy. In addition to these technological factors, the company also addresses human resource and corporate social responsibility concerns.

Sharp Corporation's business strategy is centered on its goods. Currently, the company is most proud of its LCD televisions. The company's emphasis on LCD manufacture is driven by the growing demand for such electronic items. Another successful product for Sharp is a semiconductor. It is the primary factor that gives its product a competitive edge. Semiconductors are essential components of electronic goods. Sharp therefore integrates its own chips into its devices. This strategy has been the most crucial aspect of the business.

The expansion of Sharp Corporation's production facilities is another component of its global strategy. The company's Kameyama facility expanded in size and capacity. A component of the strategy is to limit the costs incurred by manufacturing facilities. Sharp Corporation co-develops some electronic components rather than relying on its suppliers. In addition, the corporation has reduced the number of production lines. Sharp Corporation has gradually lowered certain inefficient production processes.

The strategy for research and development is founded on the principles of selection and focus. The company's R&D projects strive to eliminate product hazards. In addition, the RD team's products and procedures become future business foundations. RD's notable achievements include the ultra-high resolution LCD, triple-junction thin-film solar cells, memory technology, biosensing technology, and high-power blue-violet laser diode. The Sharp Corporation is presenting these groundbreaking ideas and technology to the globe.

Intellectual property initiatives are one of Sharp Corporation's top focuses. The company is among those who advocate for patent rights. This will give protection for the firm's original innovations. The vast majority of product details are protected. In addition, the corporation archives its patents for systematic recall. Sharp's global strategy also includes the consideration of corporate social responsibility. Sharp Corporation advocates environmental protection. The company engages in recycling and ensures that garbage are disposed of properly.

Corporate governance is the basis of global strategies. Implementing strategy requires crucial managerial decisions. Sharp Corporation guarantees the prompt delivery of judgments. The company's organizational structure supports the concept of teamwork. It enables for the examination and integration of concepts. Marketing is a component of Sharp Corporation's global initiatives. Sharp Corporation must expend effort to promote its electronic commodities in competitive markets due to the variety of its products.

Company Analysis

Sharp Corporation is well-known for both its internal and external factors. Several techniques are used to analyze the company. These include the examination of the company's operations and capabilities. In addition, the analysis will provide insights into the impact of these factors on the company's success. The Sharp Corporation's internal strengths and weaknesses are essential. Additionally, external possibilities and weaknesses contribute to the company's value. These intersections can lead to the logical development of global strategy.

Sharp Corporation's value-adding initiatives will also be discussed in the corporate study. Value-added activities are essential since they determine the product's quality. In a competitive market, methods of value addition are essential to success. The analysis will identify external factors that can have an impact on global strategies and business success. Political, economic, social, and technological factors are included. All of these factors determine how future tactics are developed.

The company's resources are the foundation of its operations. Without these resources, Sharp Corporation will be incapable of achieving its objectives. These resources may be corporeal or intangible. Each is equally valuable and complements the other. The VRIO framework is an additional crucial element of the organization. This includes the worth, scarcity, imitability, and vulnerability to exploitation. These factors are essential components of global plans of the future.

SWOT Analysis

Hussey (1999) described SWOT analysis as an examination of an organization's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. This acts as an evaluation of the present market position of the company. Innovation is the fundamental strength of the organization. Sharp's identity is derived from its goods. Sharp Corporation's reputation is one of its most valuable assets. The company's brands are renowned for their great quality. However, Sharp Corporation has several glaring vulnerabilities. This includes ineffective production lines and unproductive industrial areas.

As previously indicated, global demand for LCD continues to rise. This is the primary reason why Sharp Corporation is concentrating on the specified product. There are also emerging markets beyond its borders. Vietnam and China are major demand centers. On the other hand, Sharp is endangered by market rivalry. There are numerous competitors vying for a small market share. Moreover, the firm's innovations are susceptible to imitation. Improving technology have facilitated the proliferation of patent infringement.

Sharp Corporation's strength is predicated on its ability to sustain innovation. Perhaps this complements the company's global research and development strategy. However, the company must still enhance its production technique. Inefficient segments must be removed from the formula. Sharp Corporation enjoys a huge benefit from the rising global demand. However, imitation must be tackled to preserve the value of its products. It is essential to preserve the strengths and possibilities while reducing the flaws and dangers.

Five-Factor Model

Porter (1979) presented the notion of five forces, which aims to examine industry competition. Consequently, this will be a useful tool for constructing a picture of the food retail industry. According to the model, four forces must be evaluated to identify the condition of the fifth force (McGahan, 2004). The danger of new entrants highlights the industry's openness. Due to the necessity of technology, the sector permits competitors to enter. The industry's dynamics enable new entrants to join in the competition.

The threat of substitutes is one of the most serious challenges that must be addressed by global policies. The advent of replacements has the potential to impact the entire electronic sector. Computers, for instance, have taken away a portion of television manufacturers' market share. The spending capability of consumers is highlighted by their negotiating power. The rising demand for electronic goods indicates that consumer purchasing power is strong. It also illustrates the shift in choice among the majority of consumers.

The purchasing power of the suppliers is also an important factor for the company. In the industrial chain, suppliers play an important position. Without superior materials, it will be difficult for Sharp Corporation to produce cutting-edge products. These elements serve as an indicator of market rivalry. The market for electrical products is quite competitive. This indicates that global strategies are crucial. Sharp's ability to succeed is contingent on the dynamics of these components.

Value Chain

It is anticipated that value will be added at each level of processing until the finished product is supplied to consumers. Porter (1985) distinguished between primary activities and support activities in the value-adding process. The value-adding process includes both primary and secondary activities. The principal activities are directly related to production and sales. These include research and development, inputs, manufacturing, and marketing strategies. Sharp Corporation views these operations as the fundamental building blocks of its products.

The company's secondary activities consist of three segments. Infrastructure development contributes to the product's value. It is highlighted that production locations have the capacity to fulfill demand and reduce waste. Logistics is also an integral component of value addition. The placement of Sharp retail locations and delivery routes are elements of logistics. Sharp is renowned for its convenient shop locations and quick delivery times. The third function relates to human resources. Competent personnel receive training and development to become competitive.

Clearly, Sharp's products derive their worth from their research and development strategies. In addition, Sharp's inputs are the highest quality in the business. However, the production method remains a worry and requires more improvement. As said, infrastructure development is a component of the global plan. Additionally, the company's staff are well-trained and improved. However, logistics must be stressed more. This omission may cause problems in the future.

PEST Analysis

The political environment can serve as a catalyst for the success of a corporation entering new markets (Byars, 1991). Japan's political stability has provided Sharp Corporation with greater stability. The government's infrastructure development has enabled the company to operate efficiently. According to Thompson (2002), the current economic climate foreshadows the potential gains Sharp Corporation may obtain from growing. The European economies have supplied the expanding corporation with new opportunities. Additionally, growing Asian markets are potential sources of demand.

Tastes and preferences are influenced by social factors (Johnson and Scholes, 1993). In addition, social necessities are incorporated into the worldwide plan. The majority of societies nowadays are led by technology. Therefore, there is a strong desire for electronics. Technology is an ever-evolving creation. It is anticipated that technological advancements will determine its quality. This is the most difficult issue faced by Sharp Corporation. The company must maintain its initiative, particularly in product development.

Politics can be an asset or a liability for Sharp Corporation. Political instability is detrimental to business. A more favorable political climate will facilitate the company's expansion. The nation's economy is also crucial. Booms and recessions can have direct effects on a company's performance. In addition, Sharp Corporation is able to define target markets based on the social structure of markers. Technology advancements will enhance the research and development strategies, including the products.

Resource Evaluation

The company's resources are its key advantage. These include both actual and intangible assets. The tangible resources are inputs utilized to ensure the success of the business (Barney, 1991). Financial, physical, technological, and organizational inputs are examples of tangible resources. Sharp Corporation has significant financial resources. Sharp has accumulated successive years of net income, as was previously stated. Additionally, Sharp Corporation is a publicly traded company in Japan. Foreign investors have found its shares to be a lucrative investment opportunity on the market.

Sharp Corporation also possesses robust material resources. The company's manufacturing facilities are located in a single region. Several drop-off locations and service centers have been built to improve client assistance. Technology is one of the most valuable assets of Sharp Corporation. Currently, it holds over 16,000 registered patents in Japan and over 21,000 registered patents globally. Sharp Corporation's organization is admired within its industry. It is an organization that encourages interaction and collaboration.

Sharp Corporation's intangible assets are based on various invisible capabilities (Hall, 1992). The knowledge that its staff hold is valuable. Their qualities and skills are also beneficial to the operations. Sharp Corporation is known for its innovation. In the industry, its inventiveness in developing solutions is well-known. Importantly, Sharp Corporation enjoys a stellar reputation. The corporation has established a name that is widely recognized by market consumers.

VRIO Framework

The VRIO Framework outlines the obstacles Sharp Corporation must overcome. It is an internal tool that permits the company to assess its products and resources (Hoskisson, et al., 2004). The abbreviation VRIO stands for value, rare, expensive to imitate, and organization exploitation. It is essential for the organization to hold valuable resources. Any capacity that does not provide value must be deleted. The resources must be uncommon. This indicates that only a fraction of the market possesses it. The financial flexibility of Sharp Corporation is recognized as one of its most valuable assets.

After a resource is no longer imitable, its value and scarcity are raised. Competitors must not have access to these materials. Processes and intangible capabilities are examples of resources that cannot be imitated. The physical assets design and specs can be duplicated. These valuable, uncommon, and non-replicable resources are worthless if they are not utilized. Sharp Corporation must maximize the utilization of these resources. Organizing the business is the finest first step towards achieving this objective.

All of the company's assets are valuable. Otherwise, Sharp will never become successful. Few of these good resources are uncommon. These include the company's financial resources. Sharp Corporation advocates the use of patents and copyrights in order for these resources to be unique. The company then converts these resources into products. The majority of Sharp Corporation's products are composed of this combination of resources. The protection of natural resources must be incorporated into the global strategy.

Maintenance of the Global Strategy

The company's manufacturing system.

Africa: Ethical And Legal Issues In Business Environment Buy Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Background Legal and Moral Concerns Conclusion References

Introduction

Numerous legal and moral concerns characterize the contemporary business world. Particularly, many businesses disregard the significance of establishing moral and ethical business practices. In Africa, I have worked for a global mining corporation. Throughout my work, the company's primary purpose was to maximize shareholder value by generating enormous profits. This occurred at the expense of the surrounding society and communities. Should mining firms engage in ethical behavior? Should they bear product liability responsibility? This study examines several aspects of business ethics and legal concerns in contemporary business situations. In addition, the article will highlight certain evident legal and ethical difficulties.

Background

The number of extractive corporations has grown at an unprecedented rate, notably in Africa. Due to the tremendous resources accessible on the continent, numerous foreign companies have made substantial investments. Not just governments, but also communities, have borne a substantial price for corporate investments. Despite the significant importance that foreign direct investors play in African nations, this is the case. Initially, I worked for a global mining corporation with significant stakes in Africa. The company did not emphasize the importance of maintaining ethical and moral business practices. Despite the significance of obtaining a "social license" from the areas in which its activities are located, this is the case. This suggests that not all of its efforts met the requirements of the communities. After gaining traction in the mining industry, the company branched out into the production of related goods. In reality, it engaged a large number of foreigners to oversee its manufacturing unit in the country. This occurred at the expense of the communities surrounding its operation.

It is vital to note that the firm has significantly scaled back its social responsibility initiatives. Due to its rapid expansion, the corporation also began to contend with the surrounding villages for water resources. This is despite the fact that the populations rely largely on water for agriculture and animal husbandry. In addition, water and air pollution grew at the expense of the communities. It is essential to note that the company continued to generate abnormally high profits and, as a result, paid all its taxes in accordance with the tax code. However, ethical concerns regarding the company's actions led to massive nationwide demonstrations and protests. To this purpose, it is essential to highlight the many ethical and legal challenges that arise from the company's operations and actions.

Legal and Moral Concerns

Multiple legal and ethical difficulties are evident throughout the organization. The company should first establish moral standards to guide its operations, conduct, and activities. When making decisions on its operations, it should be able to distinguish between right and wrong. Despite the fact that ethical standards are relative and vary from context to context, it is essential for the organization to protect the interests of all stakeholders. In other words, both internal and external stakeholders should be involved in the company's decision-making processes (Duska, 2007). Prior to constructing a mine and a factory, it was crucial that the corporation consult with the local communities. It should have discussed the effects of its operations on the people's livelihoods and other pertinent matters (Weiss, 2009). Thus, the corporation would earn social acceptance and, as a result, boost its profit margin and sales.

Although the primary purpose of any corporation is to create shareholder value, modern business practices mandate that a company should also boost the value of the community and other stakeholders. According to Milton Friedman, the line between ethics and law is extremely thin. Consequently, a firm should look to the law for guidance as opposed to relying on the thoughts and beliefs of society (Weiss, 2009). Friedman's theoretical framework downplays the significance of community involvement in favor of the view that a business should adhere to the law (Duska, 2007). This is accomplished through paying taxes and providing effective company governance for all shareholders. Despite Friedman's criticism of ethics and moral values, it is evident that successful businesses in the contemporary business climate have engaged in extensive corporate social responsibility (CSR) efforts. This has not only improved their public image for firms, but also increased their social acceptance within their operational locations (Duska, 2007). To this purpose, it is essential for the mining firm to engage in community projects that reduce poverty in the surrounding area.

In addition to highlighting the company's ethical difficulties, it is necessary to emphasize the legal issues it confronts. The mining corporation is being sued for environmental deterioration. International law prohibits multinational corporations from engaging in activities that impair environmental stewardship (Duska, 2007). As a result, the corporation breached the law by using an excessive amount of water for its mining operations at the expense of the environment. Moreover, communities were harmed by toxins that the firm dumped into rivers. This has not only had devastating impacts on the communities' means of subsistence, but has also put their lives in jeopardy (Weiss, 2009). Therefore, it is essential for the corporation to ensure that it adheres to a globally recognized code of ethics and faces the repercussions of legal infringement.

The code of conduct is an additional legal factor that should govern corporate activity. Despite its efforts to fulfill its tax requirements, the corporation should have consulted its internal code of conduct. It is vital to incorporate all major stakeholders, including government agencies, employees, communities, and shareholders, in the drafting of an effective code of conduct (Duska, 2007). It is important to note that an effective code of conduct benefits not just the organization but also other stakeholders. In addition, when developing an effective code of conduct, the organization should adhere to worldwide norms. Specifically, it failed to comply with Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (ETI) regulations requiring corporations to disclose all information regarding the taxes they pay to the government, which should then make it available for public inspection (Weiss, 2009). Although the corporation submits tax returns, it does not disclose all expenses. In addition, the corporation has not complied with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) rules that assure the sustainability of mining activities (Weiss, 2009). Consequently, the company's code of conduct falls short of ethical and legal standards, indicating that it may be subject to litigation.

Bagley (2006) contends that litigations result from a company's failure to adhere to its code of conduct and operate ethically. Specifically, the company faced multiple lawsuits over its business practices and a lack of openness. Its corporate climate became characterized by demonstrations and rallies, resulting in poor financial performance. According to the country's jurisdiction and corporate law, the corporation failed to establish its capacity to protect the environment and look out for the interests of the community. In the best interest of society, the court determined that the corporation must relocate and scale back its operations. According to Weiss (2009), business litigation is detrimental. The rationale is that they contribute to an unfavorable public image that implies the company's products lack a competitive edge (Weiss, 2009). At the turn of the 21st century, Nike Sportswear Company was accused of employing underage labor in its factories. Following the verdict that confirmed the veracity of the charges, Nike's revenues plummeted significantly (Weiss, 2009). This demonstrates that immoral behavior and actions by corporations result in bad performance and deprive shareholders of a substantial amount of profits.

Companies that adhere to ethical standards stand to gain an abundance of rewards. At the outset, it is essential to acknowledge that ethical behavior incurs financial expenses. While it is evident that effective businesses want to decrease operational expenses, it is essential to analyze the costs and advantages of ethical actions. The company could benefit from an enhanced public image. According to Weiss (2009), businesses must leverage their competitive edge to remain prosperous. Moreover, ethical actions result in a greater appreciation and awareness of social and economic issues affecting the community (Duska, 2007). This indicates that a company recruits a highly trained and talented workforce from the local community in which it operates. According to the situation provided above, the corporation hires foreign workers and fails to value workforce diversity. This not only restricts the company's access to a pool of skilled workers in the community, but also increases its labor expenditures (Duska, 2007). Therefore, the corporation loses a great deal from unethical practices.

While many businesses have implemented ethical norms in their operations, others believe that the primary objective of a corporation is to maximize profits. Weiss (2009) believes that the private sector should be governed by the applicable law in the country in which it operates. According to him, lawful conduct is equivalent with ethical conduct (Weiss, 2009). Although there is a tight line between what is ethical and what is legal, it is essential for corporations to embrace moral principles that govern their conduct (Duska, 2007). The idea is that corporations are responsible for their products and operations. Any sort of negligence and poor workmanship should result in legal action. Any company's operations and goods must not be opposed to the interests of society or cause harm to consumers or communities (Duska, 2007). In order to avoid the possibility of litigation, it is crucial for business entities to adhere to ethical standards.

Conclusion

In essence, I worked for an African mining firm. The business has numerous legal and ethical obstacles. It lacks an adequate code of conduct, and as a result, it has been involved in countless court proceedings over the past few years. They range from environmental deterioration to international law and initiative violations. Specifically, the firm has endangered human life by misusing natural resources and polluting the environment. As a result, the company's financial performance has decreased. Therefore, it is essential to reaffirm the thesis that extractive businesses must operate ethically and must assume activity and product liability.

References

Bagley, E. (2006). Managers and the Legal Environment: 21st Century Strategies State of Minnesota: Westport Publishers

Duska, R. (2007). Modern Perspectives on Business Ethics Boston: Springer Books.

Weiss, W. (2009). A Case-Based Approach to Stakeholder and Issue Management in Business Ethics. Cengage Learning is in Ohio.

[supanova question]

Corporate Social Responsibility Study Buy Essay Help

Introduction

Near the beginning of the 1970s, the phrase corporate social responsibility (CSR) became commonplace. Corporate social responsibility is a type of self-regulation for businesses. It incorporated how an organization generates, maintains, and captures economic and social values. Corporate responsibility or corporate social responsibility pertains to businesses. Due to the fact that its conduct caused the collision, the business entity would bear responsibility. Environment, consumers, employees, stakeholders, and members of the public realm are affected by these acts. Life quality and economic progress are encouraged through social responsibility. Respect for people, communities, and the environment are emphasized by corporate social responsibility. Corporate social responsibility entails the enhancement of livelihood capabilities. It provides employees respect and enhances their abilities. This is beneficial to businesses since it increases their maximum income. Therefore, corporate social responsibility is one of the most essential tools for promoting economic growth. The expansive role of CSR, along with the strength and technological prowess of firms, gives extra motivation for corporations and the private sector to become more engaged in development than ever before. (Hopkins, 2007, p.14).

CSR adheres to system concepts to affect every aspect of the organization. It has a variety of objectives, the most important of which is to raise living standards while maximizing profits for the company. CSR encourages commercial companies to provide workers with life-enhancing amenities and respect. Additionally, it raises the revenue of corporate companies. Corporate social responsibility is extremely beneficial to society since it improves the living conditions of individuals. Additionally, it benefits all firm personnel.

Purpose of Research

The objective of the study of corporate social responsibility is to identify and comprehend the CSR mentality. Understand the significance of corporate social responsibility and its impact on human resources and business. Moreover, a socially responsible corporation conducts business and generates profits without inflicting harm to society or the environment. The corporate organization is responsible for the effects of its operations on workers, society, customers, and the environment, among others. Today, business leaders place a greater emphasis on corporate social responsibility (CSR) because they view it as the greatest way to advance business activities, boost brand awareness, and build trust with consumers and employees. In addition to supporting the communal interest for the development and advancement of business and society, they remove behaviors that violate communal rights. "Employees, customers, and government entities have increased their demands that businesses be more transparent about their activities and maintain acceptable standards of business practice" (Corporate social responsibility and ethical careers, n.d., para.5).

Through CSR, a company can establish a reputation as a responsible enterprise and reap additional benefits. Organizations that are more socially responsible generate more revenue and conduct their commercial operations more effectively than those that have not adopted CSR policies and procedures. A socially responsible company treats its employees with respect and offers them several incentives. A company's strong reputation on the market enhances their sales and output since customer happiness and the collaboration of the public and employees are essential to the success of any firm. Actions or actions such as engagement in the local community generate positive news coverage for a business. Additionally, a strong relationship with the public facilitates company operations. One of the primary advantages of CSR is that it facilitates the reduction of business risk in the event of an unexpected failure or damage to the organization's reputation. By extending a variety of benefits to the general public and employees, a firm gains the collaboration and support of its workforce. Consequently, the company can recover from any risk or failure. When a company has a solid reputation, it is simple to formulate the recruitment of employees. When employees have a positive attitude on the organization, they will work diligently for its success, leading to a rise in productivity and enhanced performance of corporate operations. As part of their corporate social responsibility, several companies make financial contributions to the community and encourage their employees to participate in philanthropic activities. These actions enhance the organization's reputation, enabling it to endure and compete with its rivals. Through corporate social responsibility, an organization can maintain and advance its license to operate within the local community. In order for the company to survive in the competitive business world, they must create a variety of items.

"Product differentiation can address the unmet demands of consumers while providing financial and business benefits to the firm, particularly for firms that follow socially responsible strategies. Environmentally friendly items typically command a premium price and generate more sales growth than conventional products. (Pomoni, 2009, para.6). The purpose of the invention of new products is to distinguish the organization from its competitors and to make a significant impression on the public by its moral performance and practices. Adopting CSR enables the firm to operate successfully and with minimal risk.

A socially responsible corporation is concerned not just with the development of its business, but also with the advancement of society. Numerous benefits accrue to society as a result of a company's CSR. Socially responsible businesses provide a variety of financial and non-financial aid to the public and their employees, such as education, health care, and employment opportunities. This contributes to the improvement of life and the advancement of civilization. The CSR program comprises employee training, encouragement, etc., as well as other consumer welfare initiatives. The group performs numerous initiatives and humanitarian work for the betterment of the community regardless of financial contributions. CSR enables children who lack access to education and healthcare to have a better career and a better life. All of these advantages to business and society suggest that CSR plays a vital role in the growth of a nation.

Background

CSR's internal and exterior dimensions

"The Green Paper (2001) of the Commission of the European Communities identifies two primary dimensions of corporate social responsibility: an internal dimension pertaining to practices internal to the company and an external dimension involving external stakeholders." (Krishnan & Balachandran, n.d., p.7). The internal components consist of human resource management, change management, occupational health and safety measures, and environmental impacts management. Local communities, commercial partners, and human rights are external factors. It was observed that customers seek high-quality, secure products and also want to know whether these products are produced in a socially responsible manner. Investors today view investments in environmental protection as an outstanding indication of effective external and internal management. The policy of social responsibility can contribute to the enhancement of social development. It encompasses the investment in personal resources, health, and well-being, as well as the management of change. In the production process, environmentally responsible practices relating to the management of natural resources are employed. The organizations contribute to the local communities through employment, tax revenues, salaries, etc. A range of stakeholders, including customers, sellers, and business partners, are included in CSR.

For the production process, the internal aspects primarily consist of the workforce and the management of money and resources in an environmentally responsible manner. In contrast, the exterior dimensions include the integration of businesses with consumers, sellers, the local community, etc. The availability of inexpensive labor is a motivating factor for businesses. The goal of using electronic distribution methods and machinery in urbanized areas is to replace salespeople. Increased concern for the health and safety of employees has led to an increase in organizational standards. Restructuring the process in a socially responsible manner will aid in taking into account the preferences and concerns of those affected by the decision modifications. The management of environmental effects is an important aspect of corporate social responsibility. The reduction of resource use and toxic effluents can lessen environmental consequences. This will save money on energy and pollution expenses. The external aspects are primarily concerned with the external stakeholders' policies. Enhancing relationships with the community is essential for businesses. It is significant in the upcoming market because inexpensive local labor is readily available. A company's ability to meet the expectations of its customers will be aided by its business relationships. The impact of a company's social responsibility will extend to its business partners. Organizations are required to ensure the protection of human rights in their actions.

Impact of CSR on Human Resource Management

Corporate social responsibility has a substantial impact on human resources. "CSR is an opportunity for human resources to display a strategic orientation and serve as a business partner. To affect a shift in actions and attitudes, CSR must be ingrained in an organization's culture, and the backing of the executive team is crucial to its success. HR is already responsible for conveying and implementing organizational-wide concepts, policies, cultural and behavioral changes (Corporate social responsibility, 2009, para.8-9).

The CSR program can be utilized in the recruitment and hiring process. During interviews, qualified candidates may inquire about an organization's recruitment processes. The CSR policies might increase the awareness of the organization's personnel. The CSR efforts aid the HR department in establishing appropriate employment relationships. The manner in which the company treats the employee is contingent on his willingness to assume duties. Employers examine the company's favorable characteristics while hiring and retaining employees. Human capital is crucial for enabling efficient service. Corporate social responsibility can be integrated into programs such as recruitment, motivation, training, compensation, etc. Corporate social responsibility enables the creation of socially responsible programs by human resource department personnel. It also assists managers in making crucial departmental choices. Successful social responsibility programs rely significantly on enlightened human resource management methods. Armed with a strong and committed organizational culture bolstered by competent Human Resource Management practices, firms can achieve greater profitability, employee morale, customer happiness, legal compliance, and social acceptance (Sharma, Sharma & Devi, 2009, p.7). HR and CSR efforts that are coordinated and stress required performance can significantly contribute to the success of a firm.

Literature and evaluation

David Vogel discusses the positive and negative characteristics of corporate social responsibility. According to him, CSR encompasses community interactions, environmental principles, and diversity. But its primary focus is now the behavior of multinational corporations. CSR promotes community relations; community relations are the most influential factor on the success of a commercial company. The concept of corporate social responsibility is now widely accepted throughout the business sector. Corporate social responsibility differs significantly from other management concepts. It conveys the concept of responsibility, implying that business organizations and other businesses must increase their capacity for duty or obligation. Numerous authors discuss the limitations and significance of corporate social responsibility. CSR is not about protecting the whales or ending poverty or other worthy aims that are unrelated to a company's business and are better left to the government or nonprofits, according to David Chandler. Instead, CSR is concerned with economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary problems that stakeholders perceive to impact the firm's plans and activities (Werther & Chandler, 2006, p.10).

The concepts of corporate social responsibility contribute to provide the impoverished with a good and secure living. Corporate social responsibility is not just a sound corporate practice, but also a catalyst for globalization. The primary objective of CSR is the improvement of all aspects of society, as well as the expansion of the business. According to Nina Boeger, the state must have a role in corporate activity regulation and has a duty to do so. Because the political community controls market activity, the people retain their collective power. It is an excellent strategy for the government and individual citizens to pursue. The corporate social responsibility aids the disadvantaged. In addition, it facilitates global development. The primary element of CSR is environmental protection. The health and safety of the workplace and consumer protection are also essential components of corporate social responsibility. In the case of corporate social responsibility in business enterprises, it helps to attract shareholders and employees. These organizations acknowledge and accept the employee's requirements and suggestions. As a result, the company's investment and output increase. Jennifer A. zerk notes that "the so-called 'business case' for CSR has generated an enormous amount of research, and a number of reports and articles have been published demonstrating that businesses that adopt socially responsible policies are better managed, more attractive to investors, employees, and consumers, more efficient, and therefore more profitable" (2006, p.33).

Corporate social responsibility enhances employment opportunities, hence contributing to the management of unemployment. And it aids in building positive relationships with employees and customers. According to Hines and Worcester, the characteristics of a good business citizen are hard labor and a desire for high-quality financial success. Businesses must accept the concepts of corporate social responsibility. This concept assists employees in overcoming their financial hardships and other company challenges. Educational institutions and other institutions are supported through corporate social responsibility. CSR is one of the most crucial aspects of globalization. Thus, it affects the entirety of the nation. A job applicant's and an employee's opinion of the organization's corporate social responsibility influences their attraction to the organization. Consequently, a corporate organization's success depends on the positive relations of its personnel. An industry's growth and operations are influenced by the attitudes and actions of its employees. A socially responsible corporation endeavors to comprehend the attitudes of all employees. It contributes to the expansion of marketing product. Additionally, it maintains the share's holding value.

Results and Analysis

"In general, CSR refers to the ethical behavior of company operators toward society and the environment. This requires businesses to operate properly in their relationships with all stakeholders, not just shareholders" (Global market pressures and corporate social responsibility (CSR): Impacts and implications for Thai enterprises, 2008, paragraph 4). CSR policies and programs provide numerous benefits to both the business and the community. Therefore, every firm should apply CSR for their own benefit and the benefit of society. The socially responsible corporation is more aware of ethical and environmental concerns. CSR can eradicate child labor, worker mistreatment, and environmental issues. As the business is dependent on human resources, it has a duty to contribute to the welfare of society as well. "A powerful tool like CSR not only improves the company's brand image and reputation, but also increases sales, customer loyalty, and the ability to attract and retain employees" (Pawar, 2009). The employees and society support CSR because the policies of CSR satisfy their needs, and they also receive several benefits from CSR initiatives.

Conclusion

The emphasis of this study is corporate social responsibility. Corporate responsibility contributes to economic development by improving working and social circumstances. In this way, businesses assume responsibility for their impact on the community and environment. CSR is an effective method for developing business policies. It prioritizes client and community interests in its operations. Internal dimensions and external dimensions are the two primary dimensions of CSR. The internal dimension emphasizes approaches within to the organization, whereas the external dimension focuses on external stakeholders. CSR has a significant impact on human resources activities. It can aid in the recruitment and training processes, among others. The study's findings and analyses are also reported in the paper.

Reference

Corporate social responsibility. (2009) CIPD Internet site.

Corporate social responsibility and ethics in the workplace (n.d.). 2010.Web.University of Edingburgh Careers Service

Impacts and consequences of global market forces and corporate social responsibility (CSR) on Thai firms. (2008). ITD. Web.

Hopkins, M. (2007). Is business the answer to corporate social responsibility and international development? Web site: Earthscan, p.4.

Krishnan, S.K., & Balachandran R. (n.d.). Corporate social responsibility as a factor of market success: An exploratory approach with particular reference to multinational corporations in emerging markets IIM K – NASMEI International Conference, Marketing Strategies for Firms in Emerging Markets, page 7. 2010. Web.

Pawar, S. (2009). Legal and tax considerations for businesses. Corporate social responsibility CSR. Web.

Sharma, S., Sharma, J., & Devi, A. (2009). Corporate social responsibility: Human resource management's primary function Web site: Business Intelligence Journal, page 7.

Werther, W.B., & Chandler, D. (2006). Strategic corporate social responsibility: global stakeholders SAGE, p.10. Web.

Zerk, J.A. (2006). International law's restrictions and opportunities regarding multinational corporations' social responsibility. Page 33 of Cambridge University Press. Web.

[supanova_question]

Staffing Review Report Buy Essay Help

Job Analysis, Section 1

Job analysis is essential to the HR department's performance since it determines its objectives and actions. According to Robbins et al. (2016), it serves to develop the job description, which then guides "recruitment, training, setting performance standards, evaluating performance, and compensation" (p. 113). Without a job analysis, it will be unclear who is the ideal candidate for the role or whether the current staff are functioning satisfactorily. As a result, the organization will struggle to identify possibilities for improvement, whether through performance corrections or the incentive of high-performing employees.

From the standpoint of an individual, employment analysis helps them obtain merit-based raises and promotions while avoiding overwork. With clearly defined target competencies and performance goals, the employee may concentrate on achieving them without being sidetracked by extraneous activities, which will be assigned to a position that is suited to them. As a result, workers will perform better, which will boost the organization's overall performance. This expansion, coupled with a greater understanding of the company's human resources requirements and objectives, facilitates the planning and execution of the corporate strategy, to the advantage of all business members.

Part 2

The need for the assessment is a result of technological advancements at the factory that did not result in matching adjustments to employee responsibilities. As a result, the owner of the company is concerned that there may be a competency mismatch between certain roles and their occupants. This expectation is likely to result in subpar performance from those who are not suited to their current positions. However, there is no objective standard against which their outcomes can be compared, and subjective reviews are related with prejudice and politicized concerns, making it difficult to utilize either of these tools.

This research suggests using behaviorally anchored rating scales (BARS) to address the problem. The tool, according to Prien et al. (2009), compiles a list of behaviors that support success or failure with the assistance of a number of highly experienced individuals. These practices are then grouped and arranged into dimensions that are used to define the role and assess the performance of each employee. This instrument was chosen because it assists in defining the essential abilities of each role from the staff's perspective, resulting in a superior grasp of each position's actual responsibilities. As a result, the resulting position descriptions can be more readily accepted by employees and can help dispel management's preconceptions regarding the evolution of distinct functions.

Part 3

It is necessary to consider both internal and external variables while conducting a job analysis and writing role descriptions. Mader-Clark (2013) suggests taking into account the present economy, employment market, and competitiveness while writing job descriptions to meet current needs. The first two will assist in determining which candidates are available for employment and under what conditions, while the third will provide information on which skills are in demand by organizations that are comparable. Thus, it will become clearer which capabilities the organization lacks and whether they should be acquired externally or developed inside.

Specific descriptors gathered from external sources include factors such as a position's worth in terms of salary. To attract the employees the business requires, it must provide appropriate positions at or above market rates. For the sake of competition, the corporation might assess the talents deemed essential by analyzing its job descriptions in job advertisements. It can then determine whether it already has personnel with these skills and whether they are crucial to its operations. Using this information, the firm may determine its employment needs and create competitive job postings to fill the present vacancies.

Part 4

The most pressing issue at work today is the introduction of new technology, which people may not be exploiting to their full potential. Consequently, the following data categories outlined by Morgeson et al. (2019) should be prioritized: duties, professional standards, machines, tools, and equipment, workers and job activities, and future modifications. These sections detail the changes that have occurred since the last job analysis conducted by the organization. Therefore, by evaluating them, the HR staff can comprehend the changing responsibilities and requirements of various positions.

After collecting and analyzing this data, the organization can modify its job design and performance evaluation procedures. The former can adapt the new obligations of the post, phasing out responsibilities that are no longer relevant and potentially transferring some tasks to other positions to alleviate the strain on the workforce. The performance review may also emphasize factors that are directly related to enhanced work outcomes. Consequently, it will reward and punish behaviors more precisely, which will benefit the firm in the long run.

Job Design

Part 1

A job description consists of multiple components, each of which must be carefully addressed. Picardi (2019) identifies these as the job's title, overview, department or function, reporting structure, FLSA status, pay grade, working conditions, educational, experience, and KSAO requirements, and, ultimately, the job's fundamental duties and responsibilities. The title must be carefully reviewed to ensure uniformity and FLSA compliance. The summary assists the candidate in comprehending the duties of the position. The department or functional area's name facilitates this comprehension while preserving the internal coherence of information systems. The reporting structure represents the organization's supervisory structure, which is particularly significant for large and complicated firms but also pertinent for smaller businesses. The classification of the employment under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) determines whether the position is salaried or hourly and if it qualifies for overtime pay.

The pay grade assists the HR department in estimating the value of each role and the approximate salary that employee should get. The working conditions outline the worker's schedule, travel requirements, availability requirements, and other pertinent characteristics. The educational criteria assist establish eligibility for the post based on formal diplomas and training certificates, and the experience requirements do the same for the eponymous characteristic. Knowledge, skills, abilities, and other requirements (KSAO) include less clearly defined attributes that are nonetheless vital to a person's professional success, such as Doyle's soft skills (2020). Lastly, the job analysis produces the main activities and responsibilities, which are crucial for understanding and evaluating performance. All of these components provide the essential structure of the job description that gives sufficient information to meet the needs of the business.

Part 2

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) statute, and Bona fide Occupational Qualification (BFOQ) regulations are among the employee-related laws that must be followed. To comply with OSHA, each position's job description must include the category to which it belongs depending on the degree of exposure to hazards. Workers who conduct hazardous occupations must obtain proper training and be provided with the necessary protective equipment. For the ADA, it is crucial to distinguish between essential and non-essential duties for each position (Mitchell & Gamlem, 2017). Unlike essential tasks, non-essential duties cannot be used to exclude a candidate from a post. Codifying the distinction in the job description prevents discrimination, whether deliberate or not.

EEO law and BFOQ regulations should be discussed concurrently, as they cover the same spectrum of potential difficulties. The goal of these laws is to prevent discrimination based on ethnicity, race, religion, gender, and other immutable qualities. According to EEO standards, these qualities cannot be legally included in a job description or utilized to screen applicants for the same post. However, BFOQ acts as an exception by establishing parameters under which religion, sexual orientation, and other generally irrelevant attributes may be included as job qualifications. The first pertains to certain positions within religious groups, such as Catholic theology lecturers, and the second to jobs needing a specified gender (such as a restroom attendant). However, BFOQs as acceptable EEO defenses are infrequent and only relevant to a limited number of employment. The clause is highly unlikely to apply to the business profiled in this report, given it meets few to none of the conditions.

Part 3

The selected job description format is appropriate for the organization because it has all of the relevant elements. It ensures legal compliance and prevents the organization from being sued for damages. In addition, it allows the HR department and managers to tailor their expectations for each employee according to their position. Leaders may avoid misunderstandings and treat each person equitably if they have a thorough awareness of each employee's duties and the company's obligations to respect and meet their requirements. After the knowledge required for compensation, promotions, hiring, and other HR tasks is collected and arranged in the job description, these activities will be significantly expedited. In general, the job description format described in this report will assist the organization in enhancing its operations, assuming the information is updated to reflect the current state of affairs.

The job description will also assist employees in better comprehending their jobs and responsibilities. Vandenabeele (2016) emphasizes the significance of this understanding and knowledge of the employee's impact on the organization to the HR department and its goal. With consistent and clear job descriptions, employees' responsibilities can be explained with a minimum of misconceptions and discrepancies. They are able to comprehend the selection criteria for the position, the desired performance, and the constraints of their role. They can infer their impact on the organization based on their personal knowledge of the task they perform and the prospective outcomes of successes or failures. Employees will likely be more motivated and perform better if they have a clear grasp of their position within the organization and the steps they must take to attain their goals.

Performance Evaluation

Part 1

The purpose of a performance evaluation is to distinguish employees who successfully complete their tasks from those who struggle. The former are rewarded, while the latter are made aware of their issues and assisted in resolving them. If the organization must evaluate raises, promotions, or, conversely, actions such as layoffs, it will prioritize high-performing employees for the positive outcomes and those who do poorly for the negative outcomes. According to Falcone and Tan (2013), the objective of this method is to encourage merit within the organization, which will increase performance. Having specific examples of what the firm values and disapproves of helps employees adjust to the company's needs. They can then increase their performance, so improving the company and securing positive evaluations and the related perks, thereby integrating their personal and business interests.

Essential functions and responsibilities are the element of the job description that will be evaluated in the performance review. The HR department will have collected the metrics by which the execution of these activities is judged during the initial job analysis. In addition, it will have evaluated which acts are deemed good and which are deemed inadequate. Using this information, it is feasible to analyze the performance of each employee and determine if certain characteristics of their performance are desirable or undesirable. Depending on the nature of the individual performance category, the evaluation should combine both objective and subjective measurements. While numerical results are easier to grasp, they typically do not provide a whole picture and are susceptible to abuse.

Part 2

Historically, performance evaluations have occurred at regular periods, often once a year, and in a formal setting. However, as Trost (2019) argues, this strategy has recently been subjected to severe criticism for its ineffective use in the increasingly agile setting of contemporary business. This paper suggests utilizing a less formal and unscheduled system in which HR department representatives interact with employees to deliver and receive feedback. They will analyze previous achievements and failures and attempt to develop strategies for enhancing the former and avoiding the latter. By doing so, the department will be able to engage with employees and boost their morale, while also generating higher performance results as a result of lessening the impact of change on the workforce. To reach this objective, however, it is vital to examine and discuss performance that is pertinent to the role and the individual.

The HR department will use both objective data from the company's data collection activities and subjective information from workers' supervisors to do the evaluation. The former will be utilized to obtain objectively measurable performance metrics and compare them to those derived from the job analysis. For results more closely related with conduct and comparable immeasurable aspects, supervisors will share their impressions of the employee, preferably with particular events mentioned. The obtained outcomes will then be compared to the company's managers' objectives and shared with the workforce. Along with suggestions for improvement, the employees will have the option to respond to the review and express their input. To boost worker morale and encourage them to put up their best effort, goals may be changed to a certain extent, if justified.

Part 3

Evaluation of performance is related with several opportunities for enhancing the company's operations. As stated previously, the corporation will prioritize the merit of its employees' work, that is, acts that enhance the company's performance. In addition, it will assist distinguish the best performers from the worst and present them with incentives such as pay raises and promotions to places where they can contribute more to the organization. This study presents a technique of performance management that has the potential to improve ties between leadership and employees by facilitating more mutual understanding. Workers will have a greater understanding of the company's strategic aims and vision, and will be able to provide feedback and ensure that the implementation of this plan takes into account actual realities.

However, performance evaluations are also related with a number of concerns and obstacles that require the HR department to exercise considerable care and monitoring. Hanscom et al. (2018) cite potential problems include contextual circumstances, contradictory performance appraisal aims, and rater desire to mislead evaluations. Depending on the context, the evaluation standards may not reflect reality, and cultural differences might impact the areas of performance a management focuses. Hanscom et al. (2018) examine the inconsistency of utilizing the same evaluations for incentive administration and feedback gathering, as both objectives are incompatible. To ensure that neither item skews the results of the other, distinct evaluative methods must be applied to each. Finally, the temptation of managers to manipulate evaluation outcomes in order to avoid reducing staff morale must be considered and handled.

Summary

The current HR framework of the organization requires a comprehensive redesign, which will consist of three distinct phases. First, it is required to do a job analysis for each position in the organization in order to determine which behaviors enhance or hinder performance. The responsibilities of each employee have evolved through time, and there is currently much misunderstanding on who is responsible for which duties. Following this method, each position's new job description can be formulated and implemented. Defining responsibilities and bringing clarity, they will assist in resolving the confusion regarding the tasks and tools that should be employed by each employee, so eliminating the ambiguity. Every employee will understand what is expected of them and be able to develop and apply the required competencies.

Following the development of job descriptions, the performance evaluation process can commence. It is a continual procedure that occurs throughout the company's existence and aims to ensure that each employee meets the management-set objectives. The evaluation will combine both objective information from the company's records and the supervisor's subjective impressions. This information will be compared to the factors specified in the job description and rated satisfactory or problematic based on the results. The results will then be communicated to the employee in the form of frequent, informal discussions between HR personnel and the employee, during which both parties will seek to address issues and provide feedback. Through this approach, the organization should be able to eliminate biases while strengthening its connections with employees and ensuring the success of its strategy.

References

Doyle, A. (2020). Hard talents versus soft skills: What is the distinction?

Falcone, P., & Tan, W. (2013). Redesigning your performance review template to achieve individual and organizational change: the performance appraisal toolkit Web.

M. E. Hanscom, J. N. Cleveland, and K. R. Murphy (2018). Evaluation of performance and management. Publications by SAGE.

Mader-Clark, M. (2013). The employment description manual (3rd ed). Web.

Mitchell, B., & Gamlem, C. (2017). The revised and updated edition of The Big Book of Human Resources. The Career Press

Morgeson, F. P., E. L. Levine, and M. T. Brannick (2019). Methods, research, and applications for human resource management pertaining to job and work analysis (3rd ed.). Publications by SAGE.

Picardi, C. A. (2019). Recruiting and selection techniques for workforce planning and evaluation. Publications by SAGE.

Prien, E.P., Goodstein, L.D., Goodstein, J., & Gamble, L. G. (2009). A practical guide to employment analysis. Web.

Robbins, S. P., DeCenzo, D. A., & Verhulst, S. L. (2016). Management of human resource fundamentals (12th ed.). Wiley.

Trost, A. (2019). (2019). Human resource strategies: Striking a balance between stability and adaptability in the age of digitization. Springer International Publishing is an international publishing company.

Vandenabeele, M. S. (2016). How I fit in and why I'm significant [Video file].

[supanova question]

Employee Performance In The Ship-Repair Industry Buy Essay Help

Introduction

As a result of standardization and simplification, quality management (QM) enables businesses to provide products or services with consistent quality. ISO9001 is a technique devised by the International Organization for Standardization that certifies a company's adherence to quality-assuring management procedures. This certification demonstrates that an organization follows a process-based standard approach to assuring the quality of its products ("What is ISO 9001?", n.d.). Nokia, a manufacturer of technology, implemented ISO9001 between 2005 and 2008 (Majanoja et al., 2017). This presentation will examine how Nokia deployed the ISO9001 quality management tool, if this procedure was effective, and the future implications of this implementation.

Description of the Firm

Nokia is a telecommunications-focused technology manufacturer. The company's history ranges from being one of the leading mobile phone makers to falling short of customer expectations. Nokia has utilized the corrective action preventative action (CAPA) approach and tools for a long time to manage production and quality concerns, but some managers viewed this as purely a problem-solving technique and not a way to assure uniform quality across all operations (Majanoja et al., 2017). Hence, you

Sanna (2017) further believes that Nokia required ISO9001 in order to meet the industry's innovation requirements. As a technology and communications firm, Nokia was required to strike a balance between the QM tools and the capacity to launch novel products.

Extensive Instrument History

Nokia chose to apply ISO 9001 in order to adapt to the industry's dynamic character. Nokia was required to apply ISO9001 because "companies must address the constantly evolving quality needs and implement quality improvement practices at the operational level" (Majanoja et al., 2017, p. 30). Throughout the 2000s, Nokia's manufacturing adhered to local quality requirements and CAPA guidelines. As the information technology (IT) field entered a new phase of development, customers' perceptions of quality evolved, necessitating that Nokia implement a new system to ensure the delivery of consistent quality (Majanoja et al., 2017). Nokia therefore implemented ISO9001 to enhance its systems, operations, and procedures (SOAP).

Implementation

Nokia's adoption of ISO9001 adhered to a number of standardized procedures. In addition to reviewing its standards through internal auditing, which can be conducted in three stages: surveying, categorizing, investigating, and assessing, Nokia created documents such as Quality Manual (Blackbourn, 2007). Other paperwork includes quality standards and tools in addition to goals. Nokia committed to conducting internal audits since this method permits the evaluation of processes independently and systematically (Blackbourn, 2007). Nokia's dedication to internal auditing is necessitated in part by the need to comply with ISO 9001 requirements and monitor processes. Internal environmental analysis is conducted by routine internal audits and reports to senior management. Nokia has validated the achievement of its ISO9001 implementation through quality auditing.

Extensive Instrument History

Nokia chose to apply ISO 9001 in order to adapt to the industry's dynamic character. Nokia was required to apply ISO9001 because "companies must address the constantly evolving quality needs and implement quality improvement practices at the operational level" (Majanoja et al., 2017, p. 30). Throughout the 2000s, Nokia's manufacturing adhered to local quality requirements and CAPA guidelines. As the information technology (IT) field entered a new phase of development, customers' perceptions of quality evolved, necessitating that Nokia implement a new system to ensure the delivery of consistent quality (Majanoja et al., 2017). Nokia therefore implemented ISO9001 to enhance its systems, operations, and procedures (SOAP).

Implementation

Nokia's adoption of ISO9001 adhered to a number of standardized procedures. In addition to reviewing its standards through internal auditing, which can be conducted in three stages: surveying, categorizing, investigating, and assessing, Nokia created documents such as Quality Manual (Blackbourn, 2007). Other paperwork includes quality standards and tools in addition to goals. Nokia committed to conducting internal audits since this method permits the evaluation of processes independently and systematically (Blackbourn, 2007). Nokia's dedication to internal auditing is necessitated in part by the need to comply with ISO 9001 requirements and monitor processes. Internal environmental analysis is conducted by routine internal audits and reports to senior management. Nokia has validated the achievement of its ISO9001 implementation through quality auditing.

Outcomes and Their Influence

Using an auditing and reporting system, the company has recorded and evaluated this system. According to Nokia's QM handbook, "an accredited third-party ISO 9001 certificate covers all global Nokia Siemens Networks activities" (Blackbourn, 2007, p. 5). As a result, the implementation of the ISO 9001 standard was effective, and given that enterprises must renew this certification every three years, Nokia has maintained the quality of its procedures to the present day. In addition, senior management attends frequent meetings at which they review the documentation of quality reports, business metrics, and internal audit outcomes (Blackbourn, 2007). In addition, these specialists routinely review the Mode of Operations Reports, which cover compliance, customer feedback, CAP, and current problem-solving methods.

Conclusion

Overall, Nokia's deployment of ISO9001 was a response to industry pressure and an effort to build a uniform system of quality management, as opposed to following local CAPA standards in each factory. Initiated in 2005 and completed in 2008, the certification was awarded to the company. Creating QM guides and objectives, the business recorded the process. They validate the success of their QM tool by frequent internal auditing and analysis. Senior management are provided with reports that detail the QM system's successful outcomes.

References

The author H. (2007). Exemplary handbook. Web.

Majanoja, A. M., Linko, L. & Leppanen, V. (2017). Global corrective action preventive action procedure and remedy: lessons from the Nokia Devices operation unit. International Journal of Productivity and Quality Management, 20(1), pp. 1-10.

Sanna, S. (2017). Managing quality and innovation: the function of the ISO 9001 standard for quality management in the innovation process – Case Nokia Technologies (Publication No. 16007). Aalto University Master's Thesis. The Aalto University Learning Center

ISO9001: What is it? (n.d.). Web.

[supanova question]

The change in management at Microsoft Company provided a challenge for the company's falling business performance and competence. In this instance, the new administration prioritized characteristics that create a transformation in organizational culture, thereby enhancing staff coordination and the corporation's operational efficiency. Innovation, diversity and inclusion, corporate social obligations, philanthropy, the environment, and dependable computing were among the core values executed by the executive members (Czerwonka et al., 2018). Under the dynamic spectrum ideologies, Microsoft's optimal solution enshrined the optimal utilization of strategic governance.

One of the company's primary aims is to prioritize value over sales volume, hence the rebuilding of the corporate social responsibility philosophies in a dynamic manner. Incorporating a profound design of competitive advantage strategies is the purpose. Throughout the years, human society has progressed along a gradient of sustainability and technical innovation. In this instance, competition heightened on the global business market due to a company's strategic economic advantage (Muthukumar et al., 2017). Fundamentally, the organization prioritized the adoption of unique ideas in order to increase its ability to attract a sizeable portion of the market. The experience was ascribed to the increase in the creation of highly distinctive products and services as a result of the program.

Microsoft's primary competitive advantages include enabling the customer benefit experience, enhancing the distribution network, and improving the utility and product value. Innovation and opportunities for growth and development are elements of strategic corporate social responsibility. The company's supply chain was made more efficient and effective as a result of the cooperation proposal with other corporations. Integrating global development objectives with community well-being is an element of corporate responsibility (Santana et al., 2017). The argument illustrates the meaning of sustainability. It entails the efficient exploitation of resources to achieve higher benefits without sacrificing the original value of the elements. The enterprise's executive committee devised strategies to enhance market capacity. It is primarily the group's obligation to adjust the production process in order to foster the turnaround's spirit. In this instance, the administration executed the company's responsibility frameworks and procedures.

The development of a new product with zero carbon emissions CO2 footprints is a sustainable project that promotes a shared value. It is vital to discover locations of convergence between the operations of a business and society. The intersection between Microsoft and the community is the essence of decreasing pollution during the production of technology resources while ensuring the usage of optimal designs (Muthukumar et al., 2017). Therefore, it is the obligation of the administration to initiate the strategic management of corporate social responsibility, such as the development of a new product with minimal adverse effects on the locality (Czerwonka et al., 2018). The limitation of carbon emissions during production and processing minimizes pollution, thereby enhancing the esthetic value of the environment and the safety of human life. In this instance, the introduction of a new product with lower CO2 emissions represents a strategic competitive advantage.

Diversity in the workplace has a significant impact on a company due mostly to the orientation of cultural practices and operations based on the skillset of the personnel. Increasing worker satisfaction is one of the most essential aspects of a firm. Human capital is the most valuable asset of any organization. Consequently, it is crucial to guarantee that the formed corporate culture matches the behavior and interests of the workforce. Incorporating heterogeneity into a workstation promotes the formation of a dynamic level of competence in service provision and the product development cycle (Muthukumar et al., 2017). Legal compliance is one aspect of variance in the workplace. Dynamism in the foundry, on the other hand, is a tool for empowering the differentiation aspect in service delivery and product development. Polarity in public workplaces is a complicated phenomena involving the comprehensive application of proactive actions to enhance the incorporation procedure's effectiveness. The goal of cultural diversity is to ensure that customers and employees are satisfied with the institutional policies that have been implemented. It is crucial to build an effective multiplicity management technique that improves employee satisfaction and performance inside an organization.

In a separate dimension, globalization influenced the evolution of the consumer market. In terms of the competitiveness of the goods and services in the marketplace, the shoppers become the decisive component. Therefore, Microsoft determined to focus on customer service experience as the ultimate competitive advantage, thereby emphasizing the need to comprehend human behavior and the most effective method for enhancing character. Eventually, the personality of the employees emerged as the ultimate corporate competitive advantage (Czerwonka et al., 2018). In this instance, the issue that arose as a result of globalization is the significance of employee personalities in enhancing the purchase's sustainability and creating value.

Differently viewed, organizational behavior contributes greatly to the development of moral issues in human resource management. Individualism, collectivism, power distance, the avoidance of uncertainty, the encouragement of accomplishments, and the essence of cultural diversity are fundamentally affecting Microsoft's ethical practices (Muthukumar et al., 2017). Due to the varying socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds of the employees, the demographic dynamics of the company create contrast in the workplace. The majority of employees observe and adhere to various sociocultural norms and traditions. Therefore, Microsoft's administration deemed it vital to implement organizational behavior that recognizes the socio-cultural diversity of not only the employees, but also the administration.

A company's operational unpredictability is facilitated by inadequate communication. The intricate methods for avoiding such objections have enormous effects on the relationship between organizational behavior and teamwork. The management of a group ensured the construction of adequate communication channels for uninterrupted and rapid interactions in order to eliminate operational issues in order to ensure the group's efficient functioning. Instead of fostering cooperation, authority certifications may foster a culture of deference in the workplace. Similarly, the laborers' interactions with authorities and manners are affected by the factors of achieving and nurturing. For instance, Microsoft enabling its workforce to attain certain objectives. This 'ends justify the means' philosophy causes human resources to develop characteristics like as consumerism, competition, and assertiveness. Microsoft, on the other hand, promotes a turnaround by encouraging its employees to develop relationships and be considerate of their coworkers. In this manner, the staff learns the importance of mutual support in achieving maximum production (Czerwonka et al., 2018). The connection between organizational conduct and teamwork is mediated by cultural variety. Companies must create an ideal institutional policy framework that takes into account the distinctions amongst employees. As a competency variable for Microsoft's reinvention, the administration values the dynamic of the clients' and employees' values.

Effective monitoring and control of dynamic company processes are essential to the competence of an organization. Planning, analysis, implementation, and control are the several enterprise operations that boost productivity. The structural approach to brand positioning focuses primarily on the creation of competitive advantages within a corporation. A lack of definite corporate aims and objectives characterizes an unstructured methodology. Globalization facilitated the increase of company competitiveness over the course of decades. Consequently, a lack of succinct company objectives hinders the effectiveness of competent service offering. In this instance, an unstructured approach to public relations poses a greater obstacle to competence enhancement than a structured one (Czerwonka et al., 2018). In addition to building a brand identity, the marketing initiatives provide a clear solution for the implementation of efficient administration.

Through optimal decision-making activities, Microsoft's management team played a crucial role in accelerating the turnaround. Using strategic administrative approaches has, in my judgment, prompted substantial organizational change. Although the corporation deals with software and associated technology resources, it falls within the scope of the modern business phenomenon. On the enterprise market, the present trend encompasses the essence of service value. According to the benefits obtained from the purchase, consumers align their interests and allegiance. Nonetheless, throughout the years, the company prioritized the variety of product features with little regard for employee wellbeing. Therefore, employees engaged in activities based on the perspective of attendance rather than the motivational outlier of improved performance. In this instance, Microsoft faced a difficulty posed by the divergent interests of its employees and their bad rapport with the team's leadership. I feel that the new chief executive officer's (CEO) emphasis on altering the organizational culture and the role of human resources facilitated a significant development of the practices and an improvement in the organization's competency.

Thus, a company's turnaround is contingent on the adoption of strategic management measures. A company's sales performance deteriorates due to ineffective administrative policies. Microsoft encountered dynamic problems within the cultural mainframe and decision-making platform. The organization's hierarchical structure hindered the efficacy of governing policy implementation. However, the new management team led the paradigm change toward employee welfare and addressing the fundamental aspects that contribute to product branding. In addition to focusing on the well-being of employees, the board of directors updated the mergers and acquisitions policy in order to connect the company's objective with the improvement of customer service. A company's reinvention involves the concept of integrating dynamic frameworks that cultivate the level of competence based on internally and outside derived variables.

References

Czerwonka, J., Greiler, M., Bird, C., Panjer, L., & Coatta, T. (2018). CodeFlow: Enhancing Microsoft's Code Review Process: A Discussion with Jacek Czerwonka, Michaela Greiling, Christian Bird, Lucas Panjer, and Terry Coatta Queue, 16(5), 81-100.

Muthukumar, R., Ramakrishnan, L., & Krishnamacharyulu, C. S. G. (2017). Reversal of BlackBerry's fortunes 4. Journal of Management Cases

Santana, M., Valle, R., & Galan, J. L. (2017). Before terminating employees, businesses in crisis should investigate the reasons behind the downturn. 20(3), 206-211, Business Research Quarterly, BRQ

[supanova question]

Companies With Organizational Behavior Problems: Uber Culture Case Study Buy Essay Help

The problem case study examines Uber's organizational behavior in light of theoretical context and provides solutions to enhance organizational performance. Explore Uber's work culture in 2021, as well as theoretical parts of the research and strategic workplace decisions.
Table of Contents

Uber's History Obstacles Uber Faces Identification of Problem Concepts Recommendations Conclusion Bibliography

Uber's Beginnings

Organizational behavior is crucial in determining a company's success or failure. How the management handles its subordinates and how the organization as a whole interacts with its target customers are factors of outstanding performance. This essay will investigate the organizational behavior of Uber, a transportation corporation with a global reach. Specifically, the essay will examine some of the challenges faced by the aforementioned organization and provide solutions and recommendations.

Obstacles Confronted by Uber

Uber is the most popular taxi service application in the world, with 40 million monthly users worldwide. Due to its implementation of a low-cost, high-value organizational strategy, the company has managed to become the leading market shareholder. When analyzing the strategic position of Uber, it can be said that a large number of individuals travel from one location to another daily. Uber must ensure that there is always a car accessible to pick up passengers in order to maximize efficiency.

For this to be possible, the company must not only attract a large number of drivers to the platform, but also ensure that all drivers' interactions with the application are satisfactory and that they remain loyal to the company. In turn, Uber faces the difficulty of encouraging drivers to work through challenging shifts with limited supervision. As previously said, Uber offers more cheap rates than conventional taxis. Therefore, drivers must be willing to pick up and drop off clients at inexpensive pricing. According to critics, the arrangement just benefits Uber, not the drivers. Consequently, one of Uber's greatest challenges is the financial motivation of its drivers.

The corporation and the driver each receive a portion of the revenue generated by the rides. Consequently, drivers must work longer hours to earn more money. In order to prevent drivers from abandoning their vehicles, Uber must continuously devise new means of encouraging them. Some of the incentives employed by the company to inspire the drivers can be compared to a dangling carrot because they permit the drivers to work flexible hours, as opposed to the eight-to-five rule that corporations promote.

For some drivers, this freedom allows them to take on other tasks and is consequently viewed as an advantage. It is crucial to mention, however, that due to such perceptions, drivers face health problems and exhaustion. Consequently, the ongoing exhaustion of the company's drivers is a second issue. It is vital to note that exhaustion can be described in two different ways. The first is, as noted, the reality that the drivers have additional occupations. The second explanation for Uber driver exhaustion is that many of them overwork to earn substantial amounts of money.

The company's high driver churn rate indicates that its present motivational techniques are ineffective. According to Sofe, one of the top causes of employee turnover in firms is work satisfaction (34). If an employee is content with his or her position, he or she will naturally like to preserve it. Likewise, if an employee is dissatisfied with his or her employment, he or she will be forced to leave owing to low morale. In an effort to assist Uber in achieving a Pareto-efficient posture, this study will examine the many challenges reported in order to offer beneficial contributions to the company using various organizational behavior theories.

Problem Identification Concepts

Uber's current challenges can be resolved by first comprehending the individual-to-organization relationship. Weiner characterizes the link between the individual and the organization as a psychological contract (19). The aforementioned contract includes various stipulations. First, employees must be made aware of the management's expectations for their contribution to the firm in terms of abilities and loyalty. On the other hand, the organization is expected to offer incentives, which consist mostly of psychological motivation and prizes.

An employee's potential contributions to the organization in the form of skills and knowledge are regarded as useful during the appraisal process. The drivers' contributions to Uber consist of client service, time, and dedication. Considering Uber's distinctive makeup, one could argue that the company has yet to balance the value of the driver with the motivation and rewards provided. Over the years, attempts have been made to reduce employee turnover. Uber has conducted research to examine driver psychology. The company has devised incentives based on the collected data, such as sending emails and text messages to drivers telling them of high-demand locations and their potential cash goals.

Consequently, the problem of work suitability must be considered while examining Uber's motivation and rewards system. Montgomery defines job fit as the degree to which an individual's personal contributions correspond with the incentives offered by an employer (78).

In an effort to earn more money, Uber drivers devote an excessive amount of time to the company. Due to the delicate nature of the position, the stated is exceedingly risky. Indeed, drowsy drivers can cause automobile collisions and injure themselves and others. Given Uber's substantial market share, it could be claimed that drivers have little choice but to continue working for the transportation company. Having said that, it is equally essential to note that despite the company's profitability, the operational difficulties it faces are serious and must be remedied.

Individual-to-Organizational Theory

One of the course concepts that may be used to comprehend the interaction between the firm and the drivers is the theory of personal-to-organization. The aforementioned hypothesis consists of five major components: agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, extraversion, and openness.

Agreeableness

This is an individual's capacity to get along with others. Uber drivers must possess this quality because the company anticipates that they will encounter a variety of personalities. It is vital to remember that clients are typically encouraged to rate their drivers through the application. It might be argued that clients rate drivers based on their agreeableness. The rating is then used to assign clients to the drivers. Additionally, the rating is utilized to periodically evaluate the drivers.

Conscientiousness

The driver's concentration is governed by conscientiousness. Drivers must establish and pursue their objectives. One could claim that drivers without daily objectives wind up working extra hours. This trait is essential for Uber since it ensures job compatibility. Uber should be concerned with the realism of the goals set by drivers in order to prevent demotivation when goals are not met.

Neuroticism

This is the capacity to effectively manage anger, irritability, and anxiety on the job. As previously stated, drivers must be able to engage with a variety of personalities on a regular basis and be able to tolerate their differences. Interestingly, Uber concedes that certain customers can be challenging. Consequently, the organization now permits drivers to rate clients. The rating is utilized to help the company and other drivers avoid aggressive customers. It might be said that the client's rating also serves to inspire the drivers.

Extraversion

A driver must feel at ease forming and sustaining relationships. The employer relationship is the most important of the stated relationships. A positive relationship with the employer will guarantee that the employee's needs are met and that job satisfaction is high.

Openness

A driver that is open to change and new philosophies is able to make their work more efficient. Regarding the issue of dealing with different personalities, however, the driver must be receptive to the cultural and individual peculiarities that clients possess in order to serve them more effectively.

Attribution Principle

The idea of attitudes can also be applied to the analysis of the organization's function in the life of the driver. The two fundamental components of this hypothesis are work-related characteristics and mood.

Work-Related Qualities

Among the most important work-related characteristics are job satisfaction and job dedication. As previously stated, one of the company's issues is that its drivers lack motivation. Motivated goes hand in hand with job satisfaction and dedication. One of the causes contributing to the low level of satisfaction is the absence of intercultural training required for drivers to interact with the application's diverse clientele.

Mood

The negative connotation of the employment is a second difficulty Uber must contend with. Negativity originates from both drivers and customers. As said, many drivers and critics allege that the corporation charges the drivers a substantial fee for the usage of the platform. These disputes have left a poor impression on the drivers, who feel they should be paid more. On the other side, some customers have a poor perception of Uber due to the unskilled drivers they receive.

Using the attribution theory to explain how mood impacts Uber, it is possible to claim that a pessimistic Uber driver will ascribe his or her poor perspective to lengthy working hours and low income. However, the work schedule is extremely flexible. Therefore, job satisfaction will be minimal, and job fit will be compromised. In response, the pessimistic driver will choose to depart, contributing to the high turnover rate.

Workplace Conduct

Additionally, workplace conduct can be used to characterize the issue Uber is facing. Workplace behavior can be described as employee actions that have a direct impact on the company's effectiveness or output. Using the aforementioned definition, it is possible to argue that Uber has efficient operations that incentivize drivers to work long hours to match the demand for the service/application in an effort to collect good customer feedback.

In contrast, Pound et al. see a company's operations through performance behaviors (11). Performance behaviors are the sets of actions that an organization wants all employees to possess in order to achieve its objectives. Uber wants its drivers to always prioritize safety to ensure the dependability of their services. However, the fact that employees must work longer hours to meet their daily goals is problematic for both the organization and the drivers (How Uber Uses Psychological Tricks 1). Frequently, the organization's expectations are not met.

Behavior and performance in the workplace must be in equilibrium for Pareto efficiency to occur. Uber has been unable to establish this equilibrium since some of the company's objectives overlap. In some regions, Uber drivers are permitted to defy the company's restrictions in order to meet the financial goals they have set for themselves. As a result, Uber's drivers display dysfunctional conduct. At this stage, it is essential to question oneself whose responsibility it is that the company is dysfunctional. This question can be answered by investigating the notion of motivation.

Motivation

Motivation is the methods or strategies a corporation use to ensure that its personnel exhibit the required performance characteristics (3). Heiner observed that motivation is crucial because it is a function of performance and output in general (3). Uber has been successful in motivating its drivers through goal-directed actions. Their drivers are continuously informed of high-performance areas and provided advice on how to reach their financial objectives. The attractiveness of obtaining these objectives motivates drivers to work excessively.

Therefore, one could say that Uber has chosen a conventional approach to employee motivation. The concept implies that money is the primary motivator for employees. In part, the offered premise is accurate. The presumption has caused drivers to become stubborn and do whatever to get money, even working overtime. It should be highlighted, however, that the human resource approach fits Uber the best. This strategy ensures that the organization recognizes the accomplishments of its employees and creates a suitable work atmosphere.

Various hypotheses have been developed to explain motivation. However, the discussion will be limited to the need-based theory of motivation. Uber drivers have requirements that have not been met. Thus, despite the company's incentives, drivers continue to break the regulations and work beyond hours. They thus jeopardize life. The physiological needs are at the top of the hierarchy of wants because they contain the security needs of an employee. Due to the absence of a base wage, Uber drivers have worry of inability to supply. This is a security and physiological requirement.

The demand for accomplishment, which falls under psychological needs, must also be taken into account. Many cab drivers who joined Uber were previously self-employed or employed by a corporation. Consequently, they had set goals to achieve. However, Uber's structure permits drivers to engage in other activities. Thus, the majority of Uber drivers do not feel the need to pursue professional success.

Using the equity theory of motivation, the current circumstance can also be explained. According to the argument, employees can only be motivated if they believe they are paid fairly in comparison to others in their business. In the absence of equitable treatment, employees perceive inequity, which diminishes their sense of self-worth. In light of this, Uber drivers believe they earn less than their taxi driving rivals. They thus grow demoralized and quit their employment.

To compare equity statistically, Uber drivers' output is split by their input, and the result is compared to drivers from other companies. According to previous studies, Uber drivers are paid less and are less motivated than other drivers. Thus, the organization continues to experience substantial personnel turnover. The same premise can be used to defend the necessity of long work hours for drivers. Possibly, Uber drivers must work longer hours to earn the same amount of money as their competitors.

Motivating Characteristics of Task

To comprehend how to excite people, one must comprehend the company's goals and objectives. Moreover, motivation possesses various features, including task identification, skill variety, autonomy, task relevance, and feedback. Task importance is the most neglected motivational quality at Uber. The organization has struggled to achieve a balance between workplace behavior and performance, to the point where the drivers do not view their positions as meaningful.

Consequently, Uber must concentrate on establishing better incentives for drivers in an effort to help them appreciate the relevance of their work. Customer service and financial stability training can go a long way toward motivating drivers. Financial guidance can benefit

Shanghai Hotels’ Employee Motivation Buy Essay Help

Executive Synopsis

Because they lack sufficient knowledge on the aspects that lead to employee loyalty, happiness, and thus motivation, organisations in the hotel industry struggle to retain employees. This position is difficult for China's luxury hotels due to the industry's rapid growth. Over 2.3 million individuals are currently employed by the $47.7 billion sector.

Given that the business is also growing increasingly competitive, it is essential for hotels operating in the market to establish strong brands while keeping a competitive edge in terms of product quality, service excellence, and customer happiness. The study posits that it is impossible to attain this objective without good staff motivation, job satisfaction, and long-term organizational loyalty programs. These considerations motivate the proposal of research to examine the interaction between the three variables in the Chinese luxury hotel industry.

The study is designed as primary research that collects data through direct interviews with a sample of staff from the Shanghai, China hotels URBN, The Yangtze, Les Suites Orient, and The PuLi and Spa. The sample size is chosen so that the research may be completed with a level of confidence of 0.95. As one of the most essential ethical standards for research, care is taken to ensure the anonymity of the research subjects. After the completion of the research, it is anticipated that hotels operating in the Luxury hotels sector will develop methods for enhancing their staff incentive programmes to ensure high levels of job satisfaction and organizational loyalty.

The management departments of upscale hotels demand its personnel to adhere to certain standards of etiquette. Although direct interview data collecting is expensive, the researcher anticipates finishing the project under strict budgetary limitations.

Introduction

To achieve long-term success in a highly competitive industry, staff in the hospitality sector must display attitudes and behaviors compatible with clients' expected service quality levels (Denvir & McMahon 2002). Therefore, employees of any organization must sustain good emotional states, persistent work motivation, and strong commitment to the mission, vision, and core values of their individual organizations.

This criterion is essential for all organizations, especially upscale hotels where service quality is an integral part of brand branding. Despite this, the hotel sector faces issues such as high turnover, low professionalism, and labor intensiveness, which are key factors to low motivation, poor job satisfaction, and low organizational loyalty (Kumar & Ravindranath 2012).

In the hospitality industry, where low motivation adds to significant employee turnover, hotels operate. From 2001 to 2006, for instance, the hospitality and leisure industry in the United States experienced a high turnover rate of 74.6 percent. According to Kumar and Ravindranath (2012), the fact that the leisure and hospitality industry requires less specialized strategies than the industrial sector contributes to a greater turnover rate.

Substitution, unemployment, and the cost of leaving are also reduced in this industry. The industry quickly replaces personnel who opt to leave their positions. However, this does not protect organizations in the hospitality industry from the difficulties associated with low work motivation, job satisfaction, and employee loyalty, particularly in terms of service delivery quality.

Over the past decade, the Chinese luxury hotel market has had an annual growth rate of roughly 9.3%. (Xu, Choi, & Lv 2014). The expansion has generated $ 47.7 billion in income for the industry (Xu, Choi, & Lv 2014). It has employed around 2,300,000 people. Sustaining this development demands a committed workforce.

Therefore, it is necessary to examine employee motivation, satisfaction, and loyalty. This article proposes study on these three concerns, which are essential for maintaining effective organization at four Chinese hotels: URBN, The Yangtze, Les Suites Orient, and The PuLi and Spa. The location of these hotels is in Shanghai, China.

Review of the Literature/Background of the Research

Employees of hotel organizations provide services to consumers. The fulfillment (or lack thereof) of a company's goals, aims, and objectives is contingent upon the level of staff motivation. Consequently, consumer satisfaction with the services provided is highly dependent on employee motivation. Organizations that want to increase employee motivation concentrate on satisfying employees by meeting their requirements.

Motivation is the driving force that assures individuals within an organization do a certain task to a specific degree. Various psychological elements and physiological demands of people are met through this performance. A variety of internal and external elements within an organization influence the fulfillment of these needs. These characteristics include, among others, job satisfaction, achievement, recognition, compensation and wage satisfaction, working conditions, and workers' degree of association with an organization's success (Wright & Gardner 2005).

Job satisfaction is essential in all service-sector organizations, including luxury hotels, because contented employees are more likely to provide services that match client expectations. A luxury hotel is a high-end establishment that, on average, is more expensive than the average lodging (Qi 2011, p.217). Customers are eager to pay additional fees because they anticipate receiving greater services and an exceptional experience. However, personnel who lack motivation are unlikely to give such an exceptional experience.

Huang and Hsu (2008) demonstrate how insufficient pay, restricted training possibilities, a high level of job security, the absence of new prospects, and the denial of promotional opportunities by managers significantly affect employee motivation in the hotel business. The authors also assert that job transitions negatively affect employee motivation (Huang & Hsu 2008).

Job dissatisfaction is one of the characteristics that has garnered a great deal of interest in the organizational management concept. Multiple factors contribute to it. Individual dissatisfaction may result, for instance, from reimbursement cases, work safety, employment autonomy, and interactions with administrators (Jones 2006).

Considering that these characteristics have also been demonstrated to influence employee motivation, it follows that work satisfaction is a broader paradigm that incorporates a variety of employee motivation-influencing aspects. Consequently, job satisfaction is a significant determinant of employee work motivation. Nonetheless, it is essential to investigate if job satisfaction may foster worker excitement in the Chinese luxury hotel market.

Conventionally, the topic of work satisfaction in organizations has been treated from the perspective that job approval and worker performance are related. Therefore, when employees are satisfied with their working conditions, they demonstrate greater competence and efficacy. In this regard, Glisson and Durick (2003, p. 65) state, ‘throughout the years, many companies and employees have stuck to this view and placed a great deal of stress on ensuring that employees are content with their occupations in order to achieve the desired result.’

The predicted outcomes depend on a company's objectives and agenda. In the service industry, such as in the case of luxury hotels, the desired outcomes may include service rate and quality. In organizations engaged in manufacturing, predicted outcomes include output level increases resulting from the higher value of commodities and production capacity.

According to Chaudhry and Sabir (2010), unmotivated employees are dissatisfied with their jobs. These workers are more prone to consider quitting in pursuit of greener pastures. As a result, the actual turnover or turnover intentions in the luxury hotel business in China may aid in predicting employee job satisfaction after it is determined whether such turnover intentions or actual turnover is caused by factors that predict employee work dissatisfaction.

Research on job satisfaction shows numerous factors that increase employee loyalty. Among these factors are the compensation capacity, the degree of task allocation, and organizational conventions (Chaudhry & Sabir 2010). This observation highlights the significance of involving employees in the administrative processes of an organization when remuneration ceases to be a motivating factor and hence a characteristic of job satisfaction.

This occurs when employees grow interested with self-actualization and recognition. Incorporating them into administrative procedures allows them to recognize that they are part of the company's ownership. This method has the effect of increasing business loyalty. Therefore, they strive to do their duties so that the organization's operations are not compromised. Otherwise, employees are mediocrely satisfied with their occupations. They may consider seeking employment elsewhere.

In many businesses, the rate of employee turnover is used as a performance indicator (Beecroft 2008). It determines whether or not employees remain committed to the job of an organization. There are two types of resignations among employees: deliberate and spontaneous. Purposeful resigning occurs when employees opt to leave their jobs in order to pursue other objectives, such as self-employment, and not because they are unhappy with the work. In the case of spontaneous resignation, circumstances compel employees to terminate their employment. These conditions include meager salary, the perception of abuse, and job-life conflicts (AbuKhalifeh & Som 2013).

Although employee turnover can be managed, it cannot be avoided (AbuKhalifeh & Som 2013). In the service provider industry, resignation is one of the most significant difficulties affecting the daily operations of the respective firms. Denvir and McMahon (2002) concur with this assessment, arguing that the increased cost of acquiring and training new personnel to fill the vacancies left by the departing workforce is a consequence of the high rate of turnover in service provider organizations.

Several studies examining the effect of quitting on service sector organizations have identified the act of leaving a job as an issue that must be handled immediately, particularly by enterprises that attempt to use cost competitiveness as a success strategy (Khilji & Wang 2007). Scott and Snell (2005) extend this argument by stating that if a small percentage of employees remain with a company for no more than five years, labor costs skyrocket due to the high rate of replacing those who quit their employment.

Numerous studies conducted by service sector companies examine the cause and effect of workplace resignation. For instance, Hussain (2012) suggests that employees who contemplate quitting their employment owing to dissatisfaction have a negligible degree of organizational loyalty. Therefore, loyalty and job satisfaction are significant determinants of motivation, as evidenced by research that explores the causes of low job satisfaction and, subsequently, the concerns that lead employees to consider abandoning their positions.

The measure of employee loyalty is their decision to remain with an organization for an extended period of time. Hussain (2015) argues that diverse industries employ diversity training programs. In addition to building performance evaluation methods and enhancing working policies, they establish various reward systems with the aim of inspiring and sustaining employee loyalty.

Indeed, the major objective of planning and implementing programs to increase employee loyalty is to ensure long-term retention, with the expectation that people who remain with an organization for extended periods of time will create value. Ross (2005) demonstrates how some businesses are aware of the need to promote job happiness. However, they are somewhat concerned about the necessity of sustaining long-term ties with them. In this way, organizations run the risk of inheriting the benefits connected with employee loyalty, as it is a significant element in the decision to work for a long time.

According to Hussain (2015), client satisfaction with an organization's products or services is contingent on the nature of the goods. In turn, this characteristic is determined by the degree to which employees are motivated to maintain consistency in terms of product and service quality due to the loyalty they have created for their organization (Hussain 2015). Such products are likely to improve customer loyalty, hence increasing a company's profitability via repeat purchases and client stays at a luxury hotel. According to Jusoff et al. (2009), there is a considerable correlation between employee happiness and loyalty.

Research Objectives and Aims

Through interviews with staff at four top luxury hotels in Shanghai, the current study attempts to evaluate the relationship between motivation and job satisfaction in the luxury hotel industry. This investigation has three aims. It aims to:

Determine elements that increase employee loyalty in the Chinese luxury hotel sector. Determine whether the cited factors for customer loyalty correlate with employee satisfaction in the Chinese luxury hotel business. Determine the relationship between employee satisfaction and loyalty and staff motivation in the Chinese luxury hotel business.

Methodology and Sampling in Research

Planned research might take either a secondary or main approach. This study assumes the principal strategy. Therefore, it relies on the information gleaned from the respondents. As the major method of data collection, well-structured questions are used. In order to obtain information regarding employee satisfaction and loyalty, questionnaires based on a four-point scale are also administered. Consequently, the research is quantitative in nature. The questions allow responders to exchange knowledge and share their professional experiences.

Consequently, the information acquired is likewise extensive. In contrast to any other primary data collection approach, interviews provide the possibility to obtain information about people regardless of their emotional state. They improve the possibility that the acquired facts are accurate in contrast to other methods. However, the methodology has certain limitations. It is time-consuming and expensive, particularly when big samples are involved. The problem is addressed by deploying only a 40-person sample that is deemed desirable. As a result of financial and time constraints, no attempt is made to study the people.

In the interviews, variables such as the role and influence of loyalty on motivation and the role and influence of employee satisfaction on motivation are collected. Consideration is given to the significance of these factors when determining the workers' proclamation to move jobs soon. The decision to evaluate turnover based on a variety of variables that justify such a decision is a further crucial variable. This facet functions as a variable of control. It aids in determining whether insufficient motivation in the Chinese luxury hotel business can be attributed to factors other than customer pleasure and loyalty.

As described by Nadiri and Tanova (2009) and Seston and Ferguson (2000), the intention to quit can be measured using a five-factor Likert scale (2009). However, the four-element rating tool is utilized in this study. The categories are "not significant," "less significant," "significant," and "extremely significant."

The importance of measuring turnover stems from the fact that employees with strong organizational loyalty are less likely to consider leaving their employment in the near future. Employees who are dissatisfied with their play or lack of job enrichment are also prone to consider quitting. Therefore, interview questions targeted to elicit the reasons for employee turnover can serve to elicit relevant information regarding employee concerns over job dissatisfaction.

The interview will be performed with 40 randomly selected workers from each of the four companies (10 in each organisation). Simple sampling is employed as the sample generating approach.

Organizational Culture: Types And Strengths Buy Essay Help

Organizational or corporate culture refers to the perceptions and practices of an organization. It attempts to foster a lasting identity and is cultivated through customs and educational initiatives. After a length of time adopting the resulting culture, players in an organization have shared fundamental assumptions about internal and external beliefs that bind them together; this leads to the adoption of comparable practices that align their practices, so defining them as a group (Shafritz, J & Ott 1993).

The relevant organization will have managers and employees who share the same objectives and are cognizant of the expectations placed on them by other stakeholders. As a result of the set of beliefs that become ingrained in employees' minds, it is anticipated that such a congruence of thinking and action will build good working teams that deliver excellent outcomes. But what effect does this culture have on employees? This paper will attempt to respond to the question in four sections. It will then examine the characteristics and strengths of organizational cultures, define four categories of culture, and inquire about the effects of organizational culture on personnel.

The purpose of corporate culture is to inculcate attitudes and behaviors that enhance a company's comparative advantage. Therefore, it implies that what is being implemented must have an effect on the competitiveness of the company or organization. It is consequently the responsibility of senior management to ensure that the organization's culture is effectively communicated to all employees and stakeholders. In fact, Ram (2001) discovered that robust corporate cultures increase communication and advance effective business models, which result in long-lasting competitive advantages. Contrary to a commonly held idea, particular firm goods are not the ones that best depict the etched culture.

Ram (2001) adds that competitors can easily imitate a company's product and so acquire its culture, but no one can duplicate an organization's internal business processes or communication flow. Through this conversation, company culture is communicated to employees and stakeholders. Current personnel are subjected to rigorous educational programs and are required to put their newfound knowledge into practice.

Their practice is intended to serve as a constant reminder of the company's mission and objectives. New employees are trained and reminded to continue reciting and practicing the business’s culture, which, when joined with the practices of seasoned employees, becomes a daily occurrence within the organization. Management should be at the forefront of embracing this culture in order to serve as a model for subordinate staff. It is not uncommon for management to reiterate the company culture at the start of employee meetings.

Organizational culture could also be viewed as a method for gauging how successfully corporations can establish themselves in society by utilizing their own mechanism. This method entails determining what the society requires or desires and then giving it in full. It is consequently a system consisting of:

Inputs from society in the form of demand; outputs from organizations in the form of inventing ways and means to create products that satisfy society's desires (McManara 2008).

It might therefore be inferred that a company's culture is dictated by the market it serves as well as the culture of its competitors, and that the best cultures are those that meet their customers' needs most effectively. When developing such winning cultures, corporations and the consulting firms assisting them must consider all industry players.

Considering simply the consumers, the competition, or the employees will result in organizational cultures that are incomplete and will lead relevant businesses wrong. Instead, culture-makers should examine the cultures of the competition so that they can create even more productive cultures; what customers want so that they can design cultures that lead to high-quality products; and the type of employees in the organization; all of these factors contribute to the design of stakeholder-driven cultures (Schroeder & Mauriel, 2000) that will benefit the designing company in the long run.

However, organizational cultures may alter as firms progress through various stages of development. This move from one culture to the other is difficult for organizations, especially when one culture has been practiced for many years, if not decades. Changes in organizational culture necessitate time-consuming planning, as a hasty shift could result in erroneous decisions that have a negative influence on the firm. Fortunately, there is a vast pool of experts who assist businesses in shifting to new cultures or developing new ones. Therefore, businesses should feel obligated to utilize consulting services.

This is especially recommended when organizations are adopting new cultures as a result of changes in production processes or organizational structures (McManara, 2008), because new cultures can assist employees in remembering the relevance of the new ways of completing tasks.

Organizational Culture Elements and Strengths

Gareth Morgan (1993) asserted that should exhibit seven essential components, including:

Stated and unwritten principles, explicit and implicit standards for the behavior of all members, organization's conventions and rituals, and stories and myths concerning the organization's or company's history. shop talk, which exemplifies typical language used within and outside the organization; climate, which exemplifies feelings evoked by the way members of an organization interact with each other, with competitors in the industry, and with their organization’s environment, which includes the facilities they occupy; and metaphors and symbols, which could be conscious or unconscious but are evidently embodied in the organization's cultural elements.

Morgan (1993) elaborated that strong organizational cultures are empowered by a number of strengths that are effectively implemented into the design phase. These strengths must address the needs of all stakeholders in the industry, including employees, shareholders, competitors, customers, and authorities, among others; this explains another reason why stakeholders' opinions should be solicited during the design process, as previously illustrated in this paper. Most consulting firms are aware of this reality and can be of great assistance to businesses. These strengths can be utilized in a variety of organizations and businesses, regardless of their size or industry, as long as they are blended into cultures, which must then be applied. Here are the specific strengths:

Humane

The organization’s culture must always focus on the human side of the organization’s characteristics, i.e., they should not be abstract concepts that are difficult to visualize and, consequently, difficult for employees to comprehend and implement. They should also be easier for management to train new employees and serve as a role model for the rest of the organization's employees. Other firm stakeholders, including owners, suppliers, and customers, must also comprehend and be able to participate in the culture. A culture that is empathetic and simply understood could even increase the company's clientele by inspiring more clients to purchase its high-quality items.

Communication

After designing easy-to-understand cultures, the leadership of an organization should assure the existence of clear communication methods between them and employees and other stakeholders, i.e., it should be simple for management to communicate the culture to stakeholders. The management should not have to worry about how to educate other stakeholders about the cultures that will give their firm a new identity. In addition to management knowing and having an easier approach to teach others, it should be simple for stakeholders to share and practice the new culture with one another. This requires the creation of a structure that will assist people in practicing the culture at all times, both inside and outside of the company. This step is particularly important in the early stages of implementing their organization's new identity.

Personal Inquiry

The new culture should be successful in making employees, particularly senior management, reconsider their commitment to the organization's culture, values, goals, and mission. These questions will inspire these employees to increase their contributions and effect within the organization. Such behaviors multiplied throughout a company will have a greater impact. In addition, the communication channels inside the firm will likely result in employees addressing their self-question with colleagues, who will likely answer in kind. This would stimulate talks that would lead to collaborative efforts to guarantee that peers support each other to practice organizational culture.

Environment-Organization Relationship

Successful organizational cultures should be those that tie the organization to its surrounding environment. This assists stakeholders in practicing their cultures in a manner that has a good effect on the environment. This interdependence constantly reminds people of the organization for which they work, what it does, what the expectations are, who its clients and rivals are, and what regulators and authorities demand of the organization, its employees, products, and facilities.

This knowledge elevates a company above its competition. This strength enables a profit-driven corporation to outcompete other businesses by identifying consumer wants and meeting them in the most effective manner. On the other hand, a non-profit organization is able to efficiently address the demands of its stakeholders and thereby meet their expectations. This is another reason why stakeholders and the surrounding environment should be used to determine the optimal organizational culture.

Variations in Organizational Culture

Although the aforementioned strengths apply equally to all companies, regardless of size or industry, the various forms of organizational powers are most effective in specific industries and sizes of organizations (The Times 2008). This is because the success of each culture depends on the team members, their expertise, their authority within the organization, and whether the organization is for-profit or non-profit. When designing what will be perceived as the organization's identity, managers and consultants should consider all aspects of organizational culture. Inability to do so will have undesirable outcomes. The four organizational culture types are described in detail below.

Power Culture: This type of organizational culture is well-suited for tiny businesses because only a few individuals make crucial choices. It was also observed in certain large businesses, particularly government entities. The power culture of a firm or organization is not predetermined; it emerges naturally as a result of conducting business or operations. For example, small business owners rarely get down with consultants to build a company culture. This is much more challenging when the business employs only the owner and a few family members. The same is true in government entities, where the boss takes crucial decisions while subordinates carry out orders. This type of culture exists in hierarchical organizations where the majority of employees have defined duties assigned to them on a regular basis or are assigned during recruitment. Employees build a role culture when they are presented with their job descriptions and specific project management methods during recruitment. As long as personnel continue to work in the same departments, they are often required to adhere to the same duties and processes. As a result, they establish a culture of adhering to the old ways. As a result of the lack of incentives, creativity rarely plays a role in these situations. When such employees are transferred to different departments, the culture shifts and begins anew. Due to specialization, one can claim that role culture enhances long-term productivity; but, the mutinous may cause ennui. Task Cultures: This type of culture develops when individuals collaborate to fulfill specified tasks in groups. This is an important form since it boosts employee productivity by fostering teamwork inside the organization. It has a greater likelihood of fostering innovation inside the team and the organization because individuals are expected to make significant contributions during talks. By separating group duties based on the competence and experience of team members, task culture can be used to boost the organization's productivity. Such arrangements boost the rate at which projects are completed, as well as the quality of each team member's and the group's work. This type of culture provides individuals in any company the freedom to freely express themselves. Additionally, it has a greater propensity for productivity and innovation, since individuals are more likely to complete assigned assignments in the most effective manner possible. It may be utilized in conjunction with Task Culture, particularly when team members are assigned responsibilities. Such a combination will produce individuals who perform successfully within a team and efficiently with minimum supervision, both of which are characteristics of the ideal employee. By implementing Person Culture, individuals are able to make their own decisions, leaving management to make the most crucial decisions for the firm; both of these factors will result in increased productivity.

Importance of Corporate Culture

As discussed in the preceding section, practicing organizational culture is crucial to the functioning of any firm or organization. Culture enhances the economic performance and organizational viability of a business-oriented firm (Holistic Management 2000). This is because employees are aware of management's expectations and perform accordingly with minimal oversight.

Combined with a division of labor based on employee experience and talents, it is simple for department heads to dominate their regions and be productive without continual clarifications from upper management. Thus, the departments operate efficiently and the corporation achieves its objectives with relative ease. Therefore, the organization can continue to perform well after the departure of senior management. Processes, not individuals, become the organization's most essential production function.

Such streamlined manufacturing methods allow for rapid deployment of projects such as new products and services, or when undergoing organizational restructuring. All that is necessary for the organization to achieve success is for employees to begin utilizing organizational structures. Innovation will also be feasible as a result of the task and individual cultures ingrained in the organization's overarching cultures.

This will encourage staff to collaborate during important innovation periods. Due to the fact that organizational culture teaches employees about the needs of consumers, they are able to manage production processes even if certain employees have gone on to other occupations or are absent. Thus, the organization's operations will never be disrupted by an unforeseen personnel shortage.

Organizational culture also contributes to the achievement of higher levels of organizational effectiveness, particularly in the non-profit sector (Willcoxson & Millett, 2000), because all the stakeholders are aware of the organization's expectations of them. Suppliers will recognize, for instance, that late delivery is contrary to their consumers' cultural norms and will therefore ensure that things are supplied on time. Employees will also recognize that a commitment to their duties is an integral part of their employer’s culture, and should thus do their utmost to help achieve the company’s goal of providing clients with satisfactory products.

Organizational Culture: Types And Strengths Buy Essay Help

Organizational or corporate culture refers to the perceptions and practices of an organization. It attempts to foster a lasting identity and is cultivated through customs and educational initiatives. After a length of time adopting the resulting culture, players in an organization have shared fundamental assumptions about internal and external beliefs that bind them together; this leads to the adoption of comparable practices that align their practices, so defining them as a group (Shafritz, J & Ott 1993).

The relevant organization will have managers and employees who share the same objectives and are cognizant of the expectations placed on them by other stakeholders. As a result of the set of beliefs that become ingrained in employees' minds, it is anticipated that such a congruence of thinking and action will build good working teams that deliver excellent outcomes. But what effect does this culture have on employees? This paper will attempt to respond to the question in four sections. It will then examine the characteristics and strengths of organizational cultures, define four categories of culture, and inquire about the effects of organizational culture on personnel.

The purpose of corporate culture is to inculcate attitudes and behaviors that enhance a company's comparative advantage. Therefore, it implies that what is being implemented must have an effect on the competitiveness of the company or organization. It is consequently the responsibility of senior management to ensure that the organization's culture is effectively communicated to all employees and stakeholders. In fact, Ram (2001) discovered that robust corporate cultures increase communication and advance effective business models, which result in long-lasting competitive advantages. Contrary to a commonly held idea, particular firm goods are not the ones that best depict the etched culture.

Ram (2001) adds that competitors can easily imitate a company's product and so acquire its culture, but no one can duplicate an organization's internal business processes or communication flow. Through this conversation, company culture is communicated to employees and stakeholders. Current personnel are subjected to rigorous educational programs and are required to put their newfound knowledge into practice.

Their practice is intended to serve as a constant reminder of the company's mission and objectives. New employees are trained and reminded to continue reciting and practicing the business’s culture, which, when joined with the practices of seasoned employees, becomes a daily occurrence within the organization. Management should be at the forefront of embracing this culture in order to serve as a model for subordinate staff. It is not uncommon for management to reiterate the company culture at the start of employee meetings.

Organizational culture could also be viewed as a method for gauging how successfully corporations can establish themselves in society by utilizing their own mechanism. This method entails determining what the society requires or desires and then giving it in full. It is consequently a system consisting of:

Inputs from society in the form of demand; outputs from organizations in the form of inventing ways and means to create products that satisfy society's desires (McManara 2008).

It might therefore be inferred that a company's culture is dictated by the market it serves as well as the culture of its competitors, and that the best cultures are those that meet their customers' needs most effectively. When developing such winning cultures, corporations and the consulting firms assisting them must consider all industry players.

Considering simply the consumers, the competition, or the employees will result in organizational cultures that are incomplete and will lead relevant businesses wrong. Instead, culture-makers should examine the cultures of the competition so that they can create even more productive cultures; what customers want so that they can design cultures that lead to high-quality products; and the type of employees in the organization; all of these factors contribute to the design of stakeholder-driven cultures (Schroeder & Mauriel, 2000) that will benefit the designing company in the long run.

However, organizational cultures may alter as firms progress through various stages of development. This move from one culture to the other is difficult for organizations, especially when one culture has been practiced for many years, if not decades. Changes in organizational culture necessitate time-consuming planning, as a hasty shift could result in erroneous decisions that have a negative influence on the firm. Fortunately, there is a vast pool of experts who assist businesses in shifting to new cultures or developing new ones. Therefore, businesses should feel obligated to utilize consulting services.

This is especially recommended when organizations are adopting new cultures as a result of changes in production processes or organizational structures (McManara, 2008), because new cultures can assist employees in remembering the relevance of the new ways of completing tasks.

Organizational Culture Elements and Strengths

Gareth Morgan (1993) asserted that should exhibit seven essential components, including:

Stated and unwritten principles, explicit and implicit standards for the behavior of all members, organization's conventions and rituals, and stories and myths concerning the organization's or company's history. shop talk, which exemplifies typical language used within and outside the organization; climate, which exemplifies feelings evoked by the way members of an organization interact with each other, with competitors in the industry, and with their organization’s environment, which includes the facilities they occupy; and metaphors and symbols, which could be conscious or unconscious but are evidently embodied in the organization's cultural elements.

Morgan (1993) elaborated that strong organizational cultures are empowered by a number of strengths that are effectively implemented into the design phase. These strengths must address the needs of all stakeholders in the industry, including employees, shareholders, competitors, customers, and authorities, among others; this explains another reason why stakeholders' opinions should be solicited during the design process, as previously illustrated in this paper. Most consulting firms are aware of this reality and can be of great assistance to businesses. These strengths can be utilized in a variety of organizations and businesses, regardless of their size or industry, as long as they are blended into cultures, which must then be applied. Here are the specific strengths:

Humane

The organization’s culture must always focus on the human side of the organization’s characteristics, i.e., they should not be abstract concepts that are difficult to visualize and, consequently, difficult for employees to comprehend and implement. They should also be easier for management to train new employees and serve as a role model for the rest of the organization's employees. Other firm stakeholders, including owners, suppliers, and customers, must also comprehend and be able to participate in the culture. A culture that is empathetic and simply understood could even increase the company's clientele by inspiring more clients to purchase its high-quality items.

Communication

After designing easy-to-understand cultures, the leadership of an organization should assure the existence of clear communication methods between them and employees and other stakeholders, i.e., it should be simple for management to communicate the culture to stakeholders. The management should not have to worry about how to educate other stakeholders about the cultures that will give their firm a new identity. In addition to management knowing and having an easier approach to teach others, it should be simple for stakeholders to share and practice the new culture with one another. This requires the creation of a structure that will assist people in practicing the culture at all times, both inside and outside of the company. This step is particularly important in the early stages of implementing their organization's new identity.

Personal Inquiry

The new culture should be successful in making employees, particularly senior management, reconsider their commitment to the organization's culture, values, goals, and mission. These questions will inspire these employees to increase their contributions and effect within the organization. Such behaviors multiplied throughout a company will have a greater impact. In addition, the communication channels inside the firm will likely result in employees addressing their self-question with colleagues, who will likely answer in kind. This would stimulate talks that would lead to collaborative efforts to guarantee that peers support each other to practice organizational culture.

Environment-Organization Relationship

Successful organizational cultures should be those that tie the organization to its surrounding environment. This assists stakeholders in practicing their cultures in a manner that has a good effect on the environment. This interdependence constantly reminds people of the organization for which they work, what it does, what the expectations are, who its clients and rivals are, and what regulators and authorities demand of the organization, its employees, products, and facilities.

This knowledge elevates a company above its competition. This strength enables a profit-driven corporation to outcompete other businesses by identifying consumer wants and meeting them in the most effective manner. On the other hand, a non-profit organization is able to efficiently address the demands of its stakeholders and thereby meet their expectations. This is another reason why stakeholders and the surrounding environment should be used to determine the optimal organizational culture.

Variations in Organizational Culture

Although the aforementioned strengths apply equally to all companies, regardless of size or industry, the various forms of organizational powers are most effective in specific industries and sizes of organizations (The Times 2008). This is because the success of each culture depends on the team members, their expertise, their authority within the organization, and whether the organization is for-profit or non-profit. When designing what will be perceived as the organization's identity, managers and consultants should consider all aspects of organizational culture. Inability to do so will have undesirable outcomes. The four organizational culture types are described in detail below.

Power Culture: This type of organizational culture is well-suited for tiny businesses because only a few individuals make crucial choices. It was also observed in certain large businesses, particularly government entities. The power culture of a firm or organization is not predetermined; it emerges naturally as a result of conducting business or operations. For example, small business owners rarely get down with consultants to build a company culture. This is much more challenging when the business employs only the owner and a few family members. The same is true in government entities, where the boss takes crucial decisions while subordinates carry out orders. This type of culture exists in hierarchical organizations where the majority of employees have defined duties assigned to them on a regular basis or are assigned during recruitment. Employees build a role culture when they are presented with their job descriptions and specific project management methods during recruitment. As long as personnel continue to work in the same departments, they are often required to adhere to the same duties and processes. As a result, they establish a culture of adhering to the old ways. As a result of the lack of incentives, creativity rarely plays a role in these situations. When such employees are transferred to different departments, the culture shifts and begins anew. Due to specialization, one can claim that role culture enhances long-term productivity; but, the mutinous may cause ennui. Task Cultures: This type of culture develops when individuals collaborate to fulfill specified tasks in groups. This is an important form since it boosts employee productivity by fostering teamwork inside the organization. It has a greater likelihood of fostering innovation inside the team and the organization because individuals are expected to make significant contributions during talks. By separating group duties based on the competence and experience of team members, task culture can be used to boost the organization's productivity. Such arrangements boost the rate at which projects are completed, as well as the quality of each team member's and the group's work. This type of culture provides individuals in any company the freedom to freely express themselves. Additionally, it has a greater propensity for productivity and innovation, since individuals are more likely to complete assigned assignments in the most effective manner possible. It may be utilized in conjunction with Task Culture, particularly when team members are assigned responsibilities. Such a combination will produce individuals who perform successfully within a team and efficiently with minimum supervision, both of which are characteristics of the ideal employee. By implementing Person Culture, individuals are able to make their own decisions, leaving management to make the most crucial decisions for the firm; both of these factors will result in increased productivity.

Importance of Corporate Culture

As discussed in the preceding section, practicing organizational culture is crucial to the functioning of any firm or organization. Culture enhances the economic performance and organizational viability of a business-oriented firm (Holistic Management 2000). This is because employees are aware of management's expectations and perform accordingly with minimal oversight.

Combined with a division of labor based on employee experience and talents, it is simple for department heads to dominate their regions and be productive without continual clarifications from upper management. Thus, the departments operate efficiently and the corporation achieves its objectives with relative ease. Therefore, the organization can continue to perform well after the departure of senior management. Processes, not individuals, become the organization's most essential production function.

Such streamlined manufacturing methods allow for rapid deployment of projects such as new products and services, or when undergoing organizational restructuring. All that is necessary for the organization to achieve success is for employees to begin utilizing organizational structures. Innovation will also be feasible as a result of the task and individual cultures ingrained in the organization's overarching cultures.

This will encourage staff to collaborate during important innovation periods. Due to the fact that organizational culture teaches employees about the needs of consumers, they are able to manage production processes even if certain employees have gone on to other occupations or are absent. Thus, the organization's operations will never be disrupted by an unforeseen personnel shortage.

Organizational culture also contributes to the achievement of higher levels of organizational effectiveness, particularly in the non-profit sector (Willcoxson & Millett, 2000), because all the stakeholders are aware of the organization's expectations of them. Suppliers will recognize, for instance, that late delivery is contrary to their consumers' cultural norms and will therefore ensure that things are supplied on time. Employees will also recognize that a commitment to their duties is an integral part of their employer’s culture, and should thus do their utmost to help achieve the company’s goal of providing clients with satisfactory products.

Management Practices Implementation Buy Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Planning Organizing Staffing Authoritative Controlling Conclusion References

Introduction

Management practices are crucial performance enhancing strategies for any firm. They involve the acquisition, allocation, and use of organizational resources through planning, leading, organizing, staffing, and controlling. Administrators must ensure the proper coordination of crucial operations such as employee deployment for organizational management methods to be effective in institutions. Consequently, it is obvious that organizational managers perform important functions, which include, among others, information collecting, decision making, and interaction.

In my present organization, the manager's five responsibilities consist of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling. The identified management functions have had a significant positive impact on the organization. This is due to the fact that they assist the management in recognizing issues and executing effective solutions. In addition, the five management functions allow the manager to investigate the problem's root cause and assess pertinent decisions, allowing for the implementation of suitable modifications. This study paper examines the implementation of planning, leading, organizing, staffing, and controlling in my workplace (Lewthwaite, 2006).

Planning

Planning refers to the process in which an organization develops suitable strategies for achieving organizational objectives (Weiss, 2007). It enables managers to ensure optimal resource usage in order to provide exceptional customer service. Effective planning has been crucial to boosting performance at my place of employment. It has allowed the management to build clear organizational strategies that have facilitated the achievement of organizational objectives. Additionally, it has resulted in the efficient distribution of resources to various cost centers and business units with little problems.

Similarly, planning is an effective technique in the workplace since it enables managers to anticipate problems, allowing for swift implementation of solutions (Weiss, 2007). In addition, the manager uses planning as a foundation for other management techniques, such as organizing and staffing. Planning is not inherently biased in the workplace because it is applicable at multiple levels, including upper, middle, and lower management. For instance, the company's upper management ensures that long-term organizational plans are essential for setting organizational missions and policies. The policies are then executed by lower-level managers with exclusive functional responsibilities inside the organization (Weiss, 2007).

Top-level managers are primarily concerned with the workplace's goals and financial requirements for the organization to function. The middle managers are then responsible for carrying out the mission and policies established by the senior managers. In most instances, middle managers concentrate on how and when policies are executed. Then, the lower managers are brought in so that they can influence the precise plans produced by the middle managers; they focus on determining who and how the policies are implemented (Armstrong, 2013).

For instance, the senior manager at work decided that he wanted the organization's performance to increase through raising productivity and product quality. After the plan was developed, it was the responsibility of the middle-level manager in the production department to guarantee that the organization accomplishes its objectives within a certain time frame. The management ensured this by decreasing production costs by 20%, which increased the company's overall sales.

The marketing department's middle manager also played a vital role, since he improved sales by 80 percent throughout the allotted time period. By encouraging employees to engage in productive activities, the lower-level manager also performed his tasks effectively, enabling the organization to reach its intended objectives. He was successful in improving performance by increasing salespeople's compensation, which incentivized them to sell more volume (Lewthwaite, 2006).

Organizing

As previously mentioned, organizing is a performance term that relates to the manner in which organizational individuals and resources are arranged to facilitate mission and vision achievement. My workplace's organizational structure is comprised of three major components: the development of tasks, the classification of labor units, and the creation of jobs (Armstrong, 2013). This is vital, as the organization thinks that in order for it to succeed, managers must identify actions that will facilitate the achievement of goals and objectives. Additionally, the organization assists the deployment of workers in accordance with individual tasks. The organization thereafter endorses the distribution of responsibility to employees (Laios, 2005).

My workplace uses a functional strategy to organize individuals into teams and delegate responsibilities. In this strategy, managers separate various business duties into disparate divisions, including operations, marketing, and finance, among others. The managers then establish additional subgroups inside the segmented segments. For instance, the workplace's marketing division features thriving sales and promotion departments.

The technique is preferred by managers at my workplace since it facilitates the division of labor and authority among employees, hence increasing understanding and productivity (Armstrong, 2013). It is advantageous to the institution since it fosters cohesion between personnel and operational departments. My workplace integrates a variety of organizational duties in a geographical manner. This has significantly contributed to the company's success by enhancing customer service delivery flexibility. (Armstrong, 2013).

Staffing

In my workplace, staffing is a crucial management technique. This refers to an organization's ability to find and retain an effective work force capable of achieving organizational objectives (Kestenbaum, 2013). Indeed, staffing determines the strength and performance propensity of any institution, as is evident at my place of employment. Any institution that is understaffed or lacks qualified experts cannot compete with the environment's level of competitiveness.

Due to a lack of inventive and creative employees who can implement its development strategies, these institutions are unable to achieve their objectives. In my workplace, employees are seen as valuable company assets. They are treated with the utmost respect and dignity, which is essential for boosting their performance levels. The administration has also embarked on an attempt to create a conducive work atmosphere in which democratic principles are adhered to (Kestenbaum, 2013). Additionally, they concentrate on improving their working conditions and terms of employment.

As a result, they are eager to enhance their performance through effective on-the-job training designed to modernize their abilities. This explains why organizations that want productive employees should engage in ambitious staff development efforts. They should prioritize activities that increase the knowledge capacity of employees and make them feel like an integral part of the institution. Particularly, they should concentrate on enhancing employment terms, working conditions, and educational levels (Weiss, 2007).

Leading

Leadership is the process of guiding and persuading others to achieve the desired goals and objectives. Due to its importance in enhancing performance, this is a vital management technique at my organization. This has prompted management at my workplace to execute result-oriented initiatives and provide employees with the appropriate direction to increase productivity. They carry out their duties with a greater knowledge that an institution cannot achieve its goals if its leaders do not provide the correct direction (Lewthwaite, 2006). Because of this, our leaders are doing all possible to improve performance.

They participate in a variety of tasks, including employee education, representation, counseling, and performance evaluation in various business divisions. For instance, managers encourage new employees' education so that they may teach them new skills. This is vital for new employees because it helps them to comprehend their responsibilities and conduct within the firm. The organization engages in both formal and informal education, informal education consisting, among other things, of permitted attitudes, habits, and behaviors (Lewthwaite, 2006).

In addition, leaders at my place of employment engage in evaluation, which entails several obligations such as resolving conflicts, implementing organizational norms, and analyzing results, among others. In addition, they provide counseling services, which include delivering guidance, assisting employees in resolving their problems, and listening to employee grievances. Notably, my business has excellent leaders since they are constantly prepared to assist employees and guarantee that their grievances are forwarded to the appropriate authority. In addition to the traits noticed in the leaders at my job, the majority of them employ styles that correspond with their environment, temperament, and position (Laios, 2005).

Controlling

Indeed, controlling is a crucial activity since it facilitates the process of executing and assessing critical activities related to planning, personnel management, and leadership. Any institution with hopes of achieving excellent performance or coordination of activities must accept this fundamental feature (Kestenbaum, 2013). As stated, it enables managers to give stakeholders with effective instructions and procedures. In addition, it enables managers to give effective monitoring to guarantee that the production sequence adheres to proper procedures. Therefore, the notion encourages the efficient use of resources and the provision of leadership, which are essential for achieving high performance.

Managers in the workplace implement this technique while assisting employees in achieving organizational objectives and promoting the equitable distribution of organizational resources (Kestenbaum, 2013). In addition, workplace managers encourage employees to regard managing as a continuous strategy because it assists them in achieving corporate goals. The method enables the organization to effectively carry out a variety of tasks, such as establishing performance requirements for personnel and analyzing existing initiatives.

Budget estimates, manufacturing quality, and sales are just a few of the performance metrics examined by supervisors at my place of employment. Managers ensure that they exercise control when necessary so as not to impede employee inventiveness and positive motivation. Finally, the organization guarantees that the control mechanism is adaptable enough to deal with any operational difficulty (Armstrong, 2013).

Conclusion

According to the research, management practices are crucial to attaining the aims and objectives of a business. They have been instrumental in pushing performance at my workplace, thus this is clear. For instance, planning has helped the company define clear objectives so that it can proceed in the right manner. Organizing has assisted the organization in guaranteeing effective administration and methodical distribution of resources. Through effective leadership, my workplace has been able to motivate individuals to exert extra effort in pursuit of corporate objectives. Staffing has contributed significantly to the organization's success because it has facilitated the recruitment of efficient and competent individuals.

References

Armstrong, M. (2013). How to Manage Individuals. London: Kogan Page.

Kestenbaum, A. Z. (2013). Integrating Self-Management with Estate Planning.

Trusts & Estates, 152 (2), 47-47.

Managing People for the First Time, Recruitment and Selection, Lewthwaite, J. (2006).

Author: Thorogood Publisher.

Laios, A. (2005). The coach's administrative responsibilities. The International Journal of Educational Management, volume 9, issue 1, pages 10 and 10.

Weiss, H. (2007). The science and art of managing. SuperVision. London: Kogan Page.

[supanova question]

Mergers And Acquisitions: Wal-Mart And Morrisons Buy Essay Help

Introduction

This assignment analyses how Wal-Mart would merge or buy Morrison’s in order to grow its business in the United Kingdom, Europe, the Far East, and the Persian Gulf. Morrison is an excellent option for this merger because it is a household name throughout England and one of the most reputable companies in this region.

Wal-Mart

Sam Walton launched Wal-Mart in 1962 as Walton’s Five and Dime, a small retail business.

”Walton’s commitment and zeal aided in achieving a bigger sales volume, which he attained by marking up his merchandise's prices slightly more than the majority of his competitors. Walton was able to open his first Wal-Mart Discount City store in the state of Arkansas, at 719 Walnut Avenue, as a result of this mission. Within five years, these businesses expanded to twenty-four locations throughout the state of Arkansas, and in 1968, the first location outside of Arkansas was opened (Berner, 2009).

This bargain shop business is currently referred to as Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., which is actually branded as Walmart. This business, which was created in 1962 and incorporated on October 31, 1969, is today considered to be the largest department store discount chain in the world. The shop was listed on the New York Stock Exchange in 1972. (Jana, 2010). It is the largest private employer in many regions, with operations in the United Kingdom formerly known as Asda, Mexico under the name Walmex, North America operating a variety of clubs (Sam club) and a variety of warehouses in the same region, in Japan under the name Seiyu, also in India as the best price, and other countries that have these stores including Brazil, Argentina, Puerto Rico, and Canada.

Morrison’s

This grocery business was founded by William Morrison’s in 1899, and it began as an egg and butter retail store stand at the Rawson Market, which was located in Bradford, England. Until 2004, when Safeway was acquired, these stores were primarily concentrated in northern England; as a result, an additional 420 locations were required throughout the United Kingdom.

The stores were formerly known as Wm Morrison Supermarkets Plc; they are the fourth largest supermarket chain in the entire United Kingdom. The supermarkets are currently branded with the name Morrison's, which is a household name in the region of England because it has covered every retail market dimension in this region. On the FOREX market, the FTSE 100 Index is also a component of the Morrison creation of group of companies. In December 2008, its market share was estimated to be 11.8%, ranking it fourth among the other three titans. Assumed top with 30.9%, Asda claimed second with 16.8%, and Sainsbury's was rated third with 16%. (Ryle and Wachman, 2005).

Currently, 15.5% of this organization is owned by the family of the original founder. This is the reason why this supermarket has remained at the top for so long: it is run independently without interference from family, there are no family feuds within the managerial structures, and it has been assumed that the founding family has had control from afar and not interfered with the organization's smooth operation. The son of the founder, who formerly held the chairmanship, is now a board member and does not use authority that would endanger the company, but rather engages in the building of nondestructive structure.

In 2004, Morrison's supermarkets had direct control of the majority of Safeway supermarket's locations, which totaled 479 stores in Scotland and the south of England. According to the report obtained, numerous disputes arose during the acquisition. This is due to the fact that the outgoing managers altered and changed the accounting system just six weeks before the merger and acquisition was finalized, despite the fact that their actions had been anticipated and reprimanded. However, this issue was eventually handled, and this relocation was the largest in the history of British retail. This was mostly centered on the retained stores, which were primarily regarded freehold and boasted expansive dimensions and a vast parking lot. Within a few weeks of the takeover, Morrison's assumed control of all transactions.

Merger definition

In most circumstances and primarily within the business discipline, the term merger refers to the transfer of assets from one surviving corporation to another through the statutory combination of two or more corporations.

Acquisition definition

Similarly, in the same discipline, this phrase is derived from the same concept, which is the process by which one organization acquires another.

What is the definition of mergers and acquisitions?

When studying business, these two concepts frequently overlap and form a common ground, therefore it is appropriate to define mergers and acquisitions as a unit of financing and banking that focuses on funding acquisitions, takeovers, and mergers (Miller, 2008). It is typically a segment devoted to stockbrokerage firms, merchant banks, and corporate attorneys.

When considering business mergers and acquisitions, the vast majority of managers focus on whether a deal is immediately dilutive or anti-dilutive to earnings per share (Sherman and Hart, 2006). These trends typically have repercussions and drawbacks. It is deemed as foolish by managers for a potential purchaser to focus primarily on present profitability, which is frequently immaterial since the prospective owner has different prospects, a different number of non-operating assets, or a different capital structure.

Advantages of mergers

If Wal-Mart and Morrison decide to merge, the following benefits will accrue to both organizations:

Tax shields account advantages such as unclaimed depreciation or carried forward losses on mergers between Wal-Mart and Morrison's (Harvard Business Press, 2001). Balance sheet improvement and reorganization for Morrison's would primarily benefit Walmart. Investing surplus cash for Walmart Enhancement of market share for both Morrison's and Walmart Minimization of competition for both companies

For both Wal-Mart and Morrison's, the expansion of their competitive advantage stems from their merger:

Morrison's familiarity with economies of scale is simple, which benefits Wal-Mart. Wal-Mart and Morrison's merger is typically tax-free. By owning a smaller portion of a larger pie, the merger enables shareholders of smaller firms (Morrison's) to raise their overall net worth (Wal-Mart combined efforts or profits) The merger will enable Morrison to reap the potential appreciation of the merged unit, rather than being limited to the proceeds from sales (Vachon, 2008). These mergers will prevent Wal-Mart from wasting needless time in the area of asset procurement, which includes arduous and time-consuming tasks such as lease assignments and mass sales announcements. As a result, Morrison's would be obligated to continue the transaction, as this helps the contract become valid and enforceable.

Why Morrison's instead of Sainsbury's or Marks & Spencer's?

If I had to choose between Sainsbury and Marks & Spencer and Morrison's for a merger, I would choose Morrison's above the other two. This is due to the fact that, despite the fact that Sainsbury's market value is rated higher than Morrison's in terms of assets, it is still valued higher than Morrison's in terms of market value, and its growth is rapid; the same applies to Marks & Spencer, whose market share is much smaller than Morrison's.

Morrison's having a bigger market share

The greater market share advantage that Wal-Mart would obtain from a merger with Morrison's will actually pinpoint this company's market share value. This is due to the fact that both organizations originate from the same highly profitable market segment, and Morrison's is already a well-established organization with a large market share. Morrison's advantage will primarily stem from the fact that it can gain control of resources that competitors such as Sainsbury or Asda may not be able to match on the same market segment.

Due to Morrison's inability to leverage on its own market share value advantage, Wal-Mart will be the logical inheritor of these market share advantages. Wal-Mart will undoubtedly benefit from these mergers, as they own a company that merged with Safeway supermarket in 2004. As a result, Wal-Mart will have a higher market share after merging with a company that has been in the market for a long time and has a substantial market share.

Morrison's is more lucrative.

Because Morrison's has been in business longer than Sainsbury and Marks and Spencer's, it is more profitable than both of these companies. As a result of the merger of Morrison's and Safeway, their profit margin is estimated to be 3.2% higher than Sainsbury's and 6.9% higher than Marks & Spencer's. Based on these statistics, it would be better for these mergers to occur, as this firm has a larger market presence than the other two (Morrisons, 2010).

Morrison's management structures are superior.

In the context of business, especially where mergers and acquisitions are involved, organizational structure typically refers to the method by which an organization organises its employees and outputs (jobs) so that its exertion can be carried out and its primary objective can be achieved. The effectiveness of Morrison in executing its management structure has been evaluated and praised globally; this organization has the most effective management structure since its founding.

Now comparing Sainsbury and Marks and Spencer's management structure with Morrison would be a huge mistake because they do not match up to Morrison's. Wal-merger Mart's with this first-class organization, which has a very nice management structures system, would also improve on their own management structure after adopting this same system. This has been the tradition of this organization and its success has perplexed the majority of financial analysts (Morrisons, 2010). Due to the fact that Wal-Mart has had problems with managerial responsibility in the past due to the scale of these businesses, following the merger they will be able to borrow a leaf from this company and benefit from the merger. According to numerous analysts, Morrison's organization is broken down by geographical or product markets, product, and function (Jana, 2006).

Capital cost used in appraising Morrison's

I would utilize Morrison's financial data to determine its market feasibility. This is intended to demonstrate that throughout time immemorial, this group has performed admirably, as evidenced by the awards they have received for their labor and discipline on numerous excursions. This is the oldest and most efficient supermarket in the United Kingdom.

This organization has acquired, merged, and acquired Safeway supermarket in 2004, afterwards purchased the Somerfield grocery stores that were sold to them as a result of the merging of the Co-operative group, and added 35 stores to its current portfolio. This, according to the managers of Morrison's, is the store's continual attempt to meet its objective of placing a supermarket within one minute of every residence in this region.

This organization has an extremely profitable profit margin, which has been documented despite the fact that its market value declined in 2006 and has since rebounded. Records indicate that in the year 2000 Morrison's profit margin was 15% with a turnover of £ 2,969 million and a profit of £ 103.1 million after tax; from these there has been a gradual increase on this supermarket that has not been seen anywhere else; this has been recorded as an increase of 63% from the fact that in 2009 Morrison's profit margin was with a turnover of £ 14,579 million and a profit of £ 460.0 million after tax.

This is the most significant factor preventing the other company from combining with al-Mart, leaving Morrison's as the greatest candidate for this type of purchase. This is because Morrison has experienced significant financial growth throughout the years, making it an excellent investment.

financial statement summary for Morrison

Normal Dividend

Share 2004 2005 2008 2009

Interim dividend 0.735 0.725 0.725 0.725

Final dividend 4.085 4.085 4.425 5.725

Total dividend 4.810 4.810 5.150 6.450

A cumulative dividend of 4.725% is proposed, bringing the total payment for 2009 to 5.450%. This is an increase of 21% in the overall dividend (2008: 8.2%). Upon winning approval from the Annual General Meeting, the final dividend shall be paid to shareholders by June 6, 2009, with the majority of shareholders' names appearing on the members' register by May 2, 2009.

Individual Shareholder Profits

The summary of the consolidated income statement displays unadjusted individual earnings per share.

The Board of Directors has taken into account the fact that underlying earnings per share and adjusted metrics whose references are made in the statement of Chairman and CEO evaluation provide shareholders with more useful information regarding underlying performance and trends.

2008

pence 2009

pence

Fundamental Normalized Earnings per Share

Basic 9.6 15.6

Concentrated 9.6 15.

Adjusted Profit per Share

Basic 9.2 20.8

Concentrate 9.2 20.7

Fundamental and Normalized Adjusted Earnings

These adjustments are made to the reported profit for the sole purpose of removing the profits that have resulted from property transactions because the profits cannot form part of the primary activities of the group; eliminating the volatility of the income statement with respect to the net interests of his/her pension due to market conditions; and assisting in the application of an effective tax rate of 33%, which remains an approximate tax rate.

2008

£m 2009

£m

Pretax Profit 470 712

Profits (Adjustments done) with the intent of selling the property (50) (26)

(Overall pension) Variations in interest income. (9) (19)

Pretax Basis Earnings were $431,614

33% of the Standardized tax (115) (134)

Profits from normalized taxation 312 367

The modified

Responsible Management Challenges For The BP Company: Problems And Solutions Buy Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Definition of the Foundation of Responsible Management Responsible Management Difficulties in the BP Organization Confronting the Difficulty of Managing Natural Materials

Introduction

The achievement of organizational objectives in any firm necessitates a comprehensive study of relevant management practices. As the organization encounters many concerns and crises related to company activities and environmental elements, it is vital to identify solutions capable of efficiently addressing these issues, thereby allowing the business to expand. Several theoretical and practical answers to corporate management issues have been proposed in the modern era, generating a pool of executive ways available to managers. The philosophy of responsible management, which seeks the optimal balance between the interests of various stakeholders, is an emerging method. Adopting the concepts of responsible leadership for the growth of major corporations can be extremely advantageous for their future progress, since this strategy takes into account the intentions of all parties involved in the corporation's endeavors. Therefore, BP plc can considerably strengthen its policies by applying the suggested plan, enabling the resolution of social, environmental, and ethical issues.

Definition of the Foundation of Responsible Management

When executing certain tasks and growing their business agendas, massive organizations face a variety of obstacles. In order to maintain a prosperous business, it is essential to determine the good and negative effects of the company's aims on many areas. The design of the responsible management approach, which covers the issues of people, companies, and environmental influence and proposes a strategy for keeping the basic commitments, was aided by scholarly research. Responsible managers neglect three crucial domains: accountability, ethics, and sustainability. Responsible management, defined as a technique that seeks to build a balance between the interests of the entire world, considers the current status of the globe and strives to create a better environment for future generations. This unique process is centered on the profits of the entire global population, including all facets of human life simultaneously.

Challenges to Responsible Management in the BP Organization

As a huge multinational corporation whose mission is to ensure the availability of energy resources for its clients, BP plc would profit greatly from adopting the principles of responsible management. This firm faces various issues in terms of ethical management, including stakeholder responsibility and environmental ethics. In the realm of natural sustainability, BP is required to offer efficient care for natural resources, protect the health of the earth, and reduce the destructive output generated by energy consumption. Even if renewable methods of energy consumption are now being developed, the negative consequences of carbon-based electricity must still be handled. Global warming and environmental degradation are heavily dependent on a company's usage of carbon-emitting products; nevertheless, these issues could be handled by employing responsible management techniques. In order to uphold its environmental responsibilities and reach net zero, the BP firm must face the challenges of lowering harmful emissions worldwide.

The social challenge is another aspect of the responsible management framework that deserves special consideration. The stakeholders invested in the company might present an additional challenge to the organization, as consumer satisfaction with the implemented policies is a crucial aspect of responsible management. In today's society, stakeholders are more concerned with the openness of an organization's operations and its accountability for its actions. Due to the large number of BP customers and investors with diverse values and interests about declared agendas, it may be difficult to provide them with sufficient information about business policies. Protecting consumer rights and providing them with access to the company's objectives and endeavors entails striking a balance between securing business information and meeting societal needs. Resolving the demands and desires of various stakeholders is a challenging endeavor.

The realm of ethical responsibility must be taken into account in this discussion. If not addressed properly, the moral complexities associated with the acts of an international business may have negative effects. Regarding the BP organization, its ethical performance is hampered by the adherence to moral standards during the decision-making process. When implementing particular rules or even managing employee relationships, the organization must adhere to its code of ethics in order to avoid failures and conflicts. Due to the multinational nature of BP, its influence on numerous societies and their innate views must be analyzed in depth, for instance when developing marketing and corporate strategies. Managing conflicts among the various domains of a company's activity and maintaining a high moral compass is a complex task requiring deliberate and strategic decisions.

Approaching the Difficulty of Managing Natural Materials

The environmental issue looks to be BP's largest obstacle in the current state of the world's ecosystem. For a large organization, the necessity to employ consumable materials to power many activities is a challenging issue; it must give sufficient energy to numerous departments and structures while sustaining the development of renewable alternatives. Moreover, the condition of the world is the responsibility of various energy-based industries, and it cannot be addressed by a single entity. The environmental crisis necessitates the participation of other corporations that produce harmful pollutants. In addition to controlling their own impact on the environment, the corporation should collaborate with additional parties and strive to encourage them to reduce their detrimental activities. As a corporation with a primary focus on energy-related innovations, BP has an additional responsibility to offer its stakeholders with clean and sustainable sources of energy while monitoring the quantity of remaining resources on the globe.

For BP, addressing the environmental challenge is a fundamental responsibility. The division of strategic management would be best suited to find a solution to this problem, as it is largely responsible for implementing the company-wide planning strategies. This influence is notably visible in the management processes for future equipment and materials. In addition to controlling the environmental impact of the planned operations, this department can ensure that the resources used are eco-friendly, safe for the environment, and recyclable. Scheduling the work schedules and gradually modifying the use of hazardous materials is an ideal assignment for the strategic management division, allowing the organization to optimize its budget in accordance with the required modifications.

Conclusion

This article concludes with a full discussion of the concept of responsible management and its application to the many issues experienced by the BP company. The concepts of responsible management are centered on balancing the needs of many individuals, supporting the interests of people, companies, and the environment, which creates challenges for organizations attempting to handle these issues. Environmental stewardship and the protection of natural resources have been proven to involve a variety of problems associated with the consumption of finite resources, necessitating the development of renewable energy sources. BP's social responsibility appears to be inextricably related to the interests of several stakeholders and the distinctions between various consumer and investor groups. In addition to moral and strategic decision-making, this multinational organization must also uphold a standard of credibility and ethics. Among the aforementioned difficulties, the environmental problem requires immediate attention, particularly from the department of strategic management, which may significantly help to the development of an appropriate solutions.

[supanova question]

How Managers Become Lead In Change Buy Essay Help

Table of Contents
Managers Driving Change Drivers of Change Changing the Vision Competencies Required Conclusion References

Directors Driving Change

Being a manager in the 21st century necessitates tackling a variety of difficulties that continually develop in the workplace. In addition, change management duties have become an integral component of the company's daily operations. Rare is the business that does not need to adjust to a fast changing business environment. Few businesses can afford the luxury of avoiding the enormous expenses and dangers associated with any changes. The issues faced by change managers are complicated and demand specialized skills. For this reason, managers leading a transition are prone to committing various common errors, which should be outlined in depth and scrutinized. Modern managers guiding a transition should be able to move the team forward by making the objectives of the transition crystal obvious and enticing to all team members.

Managing Change

Changes in a firm may result in unanticipated outcomes, and it may be difficult for employees to fully appreciate the benefits of the transition. The majority of the time, their initial response to change is extreme caution, as the consequence may directly affect them. This is when management can intervene to speed up the process. According to Williams (2020), managing organizational change is a fundamental process of defrosting, change intervention, and refreezing. Unfreezing is convincing those affected by change that change is necessary (p. 122). Managers' primary purpose is to provide a smooth transition when implementing changes in a firm, which is an increasingly difficult challenge. Working with employees and fostering a reassuring environment within the firm are crucial.

Change leadership in an organization can be challenging on multiple levels. First, it is important to note that not all organizational change managers possess the emotional fortitude required for optimal performance. A manager guiding a transformation must be enthusiastic about the entire endeavor and persuasive when engaging with subordinates. Not everyone in charge of a significant shift has a background in management. For example, "public sector agencies generally promote individuals on the basis of their outstanding performance and expertise as individual contributors, rather than their potential as managers" (Park & Faerman, 2019, p. 98). The managerial transfer might become a problem in and of itself. Even if a person is a professional, he or she may lack managerial qualities, preventing him or her from building a great team.

Competencies Required

There are various characteristics often associated with effective managers. Some of them have proven to be particularly significant, including "the ability to coach, motivate, reward, communicate, lead change, involve employees in decision-making, encourage employees' growth and development, and treat employees fairly" (Gilley et al., 2010, p. 31). Without compassion for coworkers, effective team building is difficult. The manager overseeing the transition must recognize his responsibility for the entire transition's outcomes.

A change manager must not only discover the rationale behind the changes, but also prepare to be passionate about them and inspire their colleagues to execute the transition in a sustainable manner. An excellent change manager must comprehend colleagues' perspectives on numerous challenges and devise the most efficient methods for motivating personnel. Thus, "more than half of all change initiatives fail because the affected parties are not persuaded that change is essential" (Williams et al., 2020, p. 124). Change management's most important tools are the manager's capacity to communicate the necessity of the adjustments and his or her commitment to transform the transition into an engaging process.

Modern managers must not only form teams, but also make it clear that they are leading groups. Leadership entails sharing responsibility, participating in discussions, and providing assistance to coworkers. A important characteristic of a manager as a leader is the ability to comprehend coworkers' decisions, even when they prove to be incorrect. Consequently, "mistakes frequently result in negative outcomes, but they can also provide the impetus for significant change and promote individual and system-level learning" (Bligh et al., 2018, p. 118). One of the causes of innovation is the analysis of past errors and the development of new tactics to minimize repetition. In certain fields, such as IT, identifying faults has even become a lucrative industry in its own right. Therefore, the change manager should focus on identifying all potential difficulties in advance and occasionally view his or her colleagues' errors as additional assistance.

A manager is an employee that is required to engage with other employees in a manner that can motivate, inspire, and maintain discipline. This individual should not only be intelligent, but also possess specific soft talents that may provide emotional support to staff. Emotional intelligence is an essential trait for a successful manager. When a firm experiences significant changes, when employees are subjected to greater pressure than usual, it is of utmost importance for them to maintain a positive attitude. According to Prati and Karriker (2018), emotionally intelligent managers have greater resources from which to provide instructional and emotional assistance to staff (p. 104). Emotional intelligence is a crucial component of excellent service, as mutual understanding between employees has a direct impact on the emotional quality of the service each person performs. Thus, a manager driving a change must possess a particular level of emotional intelligence, which is responsible for establishing the proper relationship between the manager and the employee and, in turn, the employee and the client.

Changing the Objective

Managers frequently confront obstacles, as they may lack the authority to undertake some of the changes they see necessary. Invisible barriers erected by senior management are one of the most significant difficulties. In addition, granting excessive authority to middle managers may lead to a variety of difficulties, even if these managers are explicitly promoted. Failure is therefore more likely to be associated with collective emotional and political processes (Neumann et al., 2019, p. 116). Understanding the outcomes of change management tactics frequently requires an appreciation of the emotional and political dimensions of the issue.

The economy has changed substantially, and employees' creativity, responsibility, and initiative are being appreciated as never before. Therefore, managers need adopt an entirely new approach to staff. There is an excessive amount of red tape between managers and employees. According to Strategic Direction, managers' harsh and frightening management techniques have led to the poor image of management ("Putting the leadership…", 2010, p. 10). As the distance between a manager and an employee has expanded substantially, many businesses that still apply antiquated management techniques find themselves in a tough position. When they enter the employment market, Millennials and younger generations have particular expectations. These young individuals tend to perform significantly better in an environment that provides them with the ideal balance of freedom and duty.

Inspiring employees is now one of the primary responsibilities of a change manager, alongside supervising them. As a result, managers who are capable of caring for others and taking calculated risks may already be prevalent. Ex-military leaders and women are frequently found among today's most effective managers. The experts of Strategic Direction note that managers who are able to make their staff feel valued offer them with an intrinsic reason to come to work every day ("Putting the leadership…", 2010, p. 11). Being a part of a team and exuding confidence in the future success of the group is more effective than pure hierarchy today.

Managers in charge of implementing change should recognize that marketing the changes themselves inside the organization is less productive than elucidating the goals of such changes. The company's employees are sensible thinkers who will not accept an innovation unless it is demonstrated how it will improve their compensation, attitude toward them, or other aspects of their employment. Sometimes, managers may be excessively focused on their own ambitions and careers, neglecting the people who assist them in climbing the career ladder. Therefore, "transformational leadership behaviors create conditions in which followers are more likely to commit to a change by painting a positive vision of the future" (Hill et al., 2012, p. 761). Despite their employees' dread of the unknown, modern change managers should set an example and lead others.

In the majority of organizations, senior managers continue to limit their communication to a small group, excluding countless employees who may be willing to contribute. In such organizations, "remote employees have fewer chances to interact with senior leadership and thus comprehend the vision and benefits of the change" (Hill et al., 2012, p. 761). Companies in the twenty-first century must address several difficulties by analyzing all available data and determining the optimal solution. Ignoring diverse perspectives and the experiences of other workers leads to misunderstanding. Poor ultimate effects of the transformation may be the result of arrogance or unwillingness to communicate with people in diverse positions.

Conclusion

Managers guiding change should represent a distinct group of contemporary leaders who have made a long journey from excessive bureaucracy and hierarchical distance to taking chances and encouraging coworkers through support. The majority of the challenges faced by managers in charge of transformation are directly attributable to a barrier that impedes the interchange of ideas and perspectives. The primary purpose of a good manager driving change is to discover a creative approach to overcome this obstacle and to ensure long-term viability once all changes have been implemented.

References

Yan, Q., Bligh, M. C., and Kohles, J. C. (2018). The role of leadership style and mentality in learning from mistakes and organizational development. 18(2) Journal of Change Management 116–141.

Restoring leadership to management by assisting managers in leading and leaders in managing. (2010). 10–12, Strategic Direction, 26(9).

Gilley, A., Gilley, J. W., McConnell, C. W., & Veliquette, A. (2010). An empirical examination of the competencies employed by effective managers to construct teams. Advances in Human Resource Development, 12(1), 29–45.

Hill, N. S., Seo, M. G., Kang, J. H., & Taylor, M. S. (2012). Building employee engagement to change across organizational levels: the impact of hierarchical distance and transformational leadership from direct managers. 23(3), 758–777, Organization Science.

Neumann, J. E., K. T. James, and R. Vince (2019). Principal tensions in change-leading middle managers' purposeful action. 27:111–142 in Research in Organizational Change and Development.

Park, H. H., & Faerman, S. (2019). Learning the significance of emotional and social skills in managerial transitions as one becomes a manager. Management Development, 37(1), 101–110. The American Review of Public Administration, 49(1), 98–115.

Williams, C., A. M. McWilliams, R. Lawrence, and W. Waneduzzaman (2020). MGMT4 (4th ed.). Cengage Learning Australia.

[supanova question]

The Scientific Revolution In Human Resourse Management Buy Essay Help

Talents and intelligence are the most essential assets of every firm. Human resource management must hire and retain individuals that are adaptable, highly trained, imaginative, and devoted, especially in our fast-paced environment. This suggests that employees must contribute individually and collectively to the success of enterprises. According to Pynes (2008), Human Resource Management (HRM) personnel are exclusively accountable for recruiting, developing, and retaining talented employees. Unfortunately, the majority of modern HRMs are focused on professional human resource management methods, such as HR scorecards, HR programs, and HR financial reports, and are unable to integrate "decision science" to improve their talent resource decisions.

This, along with other deficiencies such as the use of traditional HR approaches such as benchmarking, which defines excellence as the delivery of high-quality services in response to customer requests, has impeded HRM workers from maximizing the success of their firms. Human capital comprises all issues that affect all employees, such as workforce planning, recruitment, training, retention, employee retirement, HC strategy formulation, succession planning, and leadership development, and is the foundation of any successful firm. Human Resource Management must adopt a human development strategy that entails careful planning in order to meet present and future (employee) human capital needs in response to developing issues (Armstrong, 2000).

Human capital planning is a recognized component of business planning; consequently, human capital planning must be integrated with business planning in order to be effective. The strategic business plan process outlines the anticipated modifications to the organization's activities. Business planning outlines the basic competencies that an organization must possess in order to achieve its goals; hence, its behavioral and skill needs are essential. Human resource planning analyzes corporate plans based on the needs of individuals. The HR planning accomplishes this by influencing the business strategy by highlighting ways in which people can be deployed or developed more efficiently and effectively to further the achievement of business goals and by focusing on issues that must be resolved to ensure the availability of the people needed to make the required contribution (Kiger, 2007).

Nonetheless, business planning is a vital component of daily operations and choices. The decisions made have a direct impact on the human capital (workforce) expected to implement those decisions. Human capital planning, which encompasses all activities necessary for maintaining a productive workforce, such as payroll and benefits, time and attendance, talent management, forecasting and scheduling, and emergency assistance and workforce tracking, must be a core consideration in business planning in order for the HR department to be able to perform effectively and efficiently (Kiger, 2007).

Strategic organization development, also known as O.D., is credited with assisting organizations to develop effective strategies that reduce uncertainty in terms of changing the structure of the organization when the environment becomes complex and forecasting and planning efforts in order to create contingency plans that assist organizations in adapting to the changing environment. According to Dunn (2006), O.D. provides organizations with a systematic approach to change by stressing explicit systems, entire system, and organizational transformation phases, as well as offering guiding humanistic principles.

On the other hand, according to Dunn (2006), Human Resource Development is looking for its identity while living in the shadow of O.D. HRD is the organizational strategy that connects the capabilities and competencies of employees with the objectives of knowledge-based enterprises. This suggests that in order to achieve this alignment, the Human Resources department must employ O.D.-pioneered techniques, such as survey feedback, structural design, and teambuilding. Therefore, this serves as the intersection between O.D. and HR, and HR should collaborate with O.D. to guarantee that HR's strategic objectives are realized.

However, in the altered business environment, the HR professional's function has evolved, and they are now obliged to play an active role in organizational design and strategic growth, as well as to collaborate with business management. Senior HR leaders must also have an understanding of the business and a compassion for people. On the other hand, while O.D. practitioners cannot excel in all areas, the O.D. field incorporates people's concerns in accomplishing its aims. For instance, employees with engineering and IT backgrounds can collaborate with O.D practitioners on sociotechnical design and process activities. In turn, this will assist HRM become powerful business partners inside the organizational leadership. The O.D. will also give HR a competitive edge by enabling it to provide exceptional human resources and high-commitment work systems that motivate, attract, and retain superior people. According to Brockway (2007), the term human resource now represents the convergence of labor relations, personnel management, and organization development.

Consequently, the HR relationship with the O.D. will aid the HR professional in implementing the strategic objectives that will serve as the organization's compass. The relationship will also assist HR in comprehending and implementing the business strategy, identifying potential difficulties and developing solutions, and comprehending corporate policies, culture, and plans. This will in turn assist the HR department in dealing with all types of employees and other stakeholders, communicating effectively both orally and in writing, and identifying and training future executives. According to Dunn (2006), HRM with an O.D orientation gains strength when firms strive to transform adversarial labor interactions into collaborative labor relations.

To quantify HRM, HRM should take a fully structured strategy, also known as (SHCP) strategic human capital planning, while examining the long-term needs of employees and matching them with the needs of the organization.

According to Trahant, Steckler, and Sonnesyn (2007), companies with three to six primary objectives are more likely to implement them successfully than those with more primary objectives. In order for HRM to meet the SHCP objectives, it must prioritize a narrow scope. To do this, the HRM should ensure that all SHCP goals are driven by the company's mission and should delete any goal that cannot be tied to the mission. Additionally, the HRM should recognize that it is hard for them to represent all of the organization's interests. Therefore, the HRM should prioritize strategic transformation concerns and avoid those that sustain the status quo.

For HR to be successful, it should also have plans for the future that address questions such as how to manage resources effectively in order to ensure that resources are managed effectively in the future, what the workforce will look like in six years, and what their tenure, diversity, competencies, and age will be in order to fulfill the company's mission. Thus, the HRM will be able to design efforts that define and recognize commitment to the actions in an acceptable and accurate manner.

According to Trahant, Steckler, and Sonnesyn (2007), not only do leaders have formal authority and the ability to make decisions that create genuine change in their organizations, but they are also accountable for their actions. Senior HRM executives play a crucial role in supporting HRM efforts by designing defensible studies and advising OPM, and as such, they should be held accountable for their actions. Nonetheless, they have positional authority that attracts the attention of others, assigns and aligns resources, and follows through on HR matters. Consequently, if they are held accountable, they will make decisions that are goal-oriented in the sense of being time-bound, quantifiable, and detailed, thereby enhancing the HRM team. According to the findings of the vast majority of empirical studies, the lack of a well-defined planning process and decision-making procedures is the leading cause of strategic plan failure. A well-planned process begins with the desired objective in mind, thus the HRM should include a statement outlining the desired outcome and detailed descriptions of the procedures required to attain it. This will constitute the road plan that focuses people's attention on the essential milestones and activities.

According to Fox (2007), a company that is socially and ethically responsible attracts customers, investors, and top talent. Good CSR is evidence that the company's profits did not come at the expense of society, its employees, or the environment. CSR not only encompasses what HR is doing, but also combines it with the core functions of the business. According to surveys, the vast majority of individuals (over 70%) will not seek employment with a socially irresponsible organization. In this instance, when the HR manager adds CSR into his strategic planning, he will enhance the employment brand, thereby retaining and attracting top people.

Furthermore, studies indicate that employee engagement is enhanced when employees are directly involved in CSR. When the HR department engages employees in CSR initiatives, employees gain a sense of self-worth and are consequently inspired by the actions performed. It is also highlighted that engaging employees in CSR could transform them into environmental solutions and foster creativity. For instance, HR might ask employees to design ways for the business to save money from an environmental standpoint. Employees may advise turning off laptops and lights at the end of each day. The staff could also develop items or methods that lower the company's environmental health risks or improve profitability.

As we have seen, for HRM to embrace strategic human resource management, it must collaborate with the O.D., quantify HRM, integrate human capital planning with business planning, and also include corporate social responsibility (CSR). However, the HRM team must remember to include decision science components. The DuPont model in finance, for example, permits firms to allocate financial capital to all business units in order to meet the demands of all personnel and activities inside the departments. In the 'talentship' concept, science decision aids HR in increasing the organization's success by enhancing talent resource-affecting decisions. Human Resources is able to make excellent decisions about talent resources, such as altering employee advocates and improvising methods of staff motivation.

References

Armstrong, M. (2000). A handbook to strategic human resource management. Kogan Page Publishers, London.

Boudreau, J. W. & Ramstad, P. M. (2005). From Professional Practices to Strategic Talent Decision Science: Talentship and the New Paradigm for Human Resource Management Human Resource Planning, volume 28(2), pages 17-26, HR.

Strategic HR Review, Vol. 6(6), 32-35. Brockway, S. (2007). "The art of business partnering."

Dunn, J. (2006). Future Alliance Between Strategic Human Resources and Strategic Organization Development? Organization Development Journal, volume 24 number 4, pages 69 to 76.

A. Fox, "Corporate Social Responsibility Pays Off," HR Magazine, vol. 52(8), pages 43-47, 2007.

Kiger, P. J. (2007, June). Workforce Management, Vol. 86(12), pp. 30-32, 34-39, "KNOWING IT ALL"

Pynes, G.E. (2008).

A Strategic Approach to Human Resource Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. John Wiley & Sons, New York.

Trahant, B., Steckler, F. & Sonnesyn, C. (2007). ‘Elements of Successful Strategic Human Capital Planning’. Public Manager. Vol. 36(2), 45-50.

[supanova question]

Analysis Of A Social Economy Organization: Miziwe Biik Case Buy Essay Help

The Aboriginal community of Toronto established the Miziwe Biik Aboriginal Employment and Training Centre in 1991 to address their training and unemployment issues. Each month, approximately fifteen employees give a variety of employment programs, services, and resources to nearly one thousand clients. The Miziwe Biik Development Corporation was founded in 2004 to promote the economic development of the town (Heritz 136).

In 2007, the Aboriginal Business Resource Centre was established in an effort to ensure that entrepreneurs receive proper training, skill development, and microloans. Beginning the process was a collection of around $60,000 from the RBC Foundation and Miziwe Biik. Miziwe Biik's activities target marginalized individuals and aim to overcome the existing socioeconomic divide. The socioeconomic divide in Toronto has led to disparities in the distribution of resources, income, wealth, and the overall quality and comfort of each person's existence in the community.

More than one million Canadians, or roughly four percent of the population, identify as Aboriginal. This demographic is significantly younger than the general population (average age of 27 versus 40). (Heritz 137). The Aboriginal population is growing rapidly despite the fact that it is less educated (half of the people have post-secondary education compared to 67% of the overall population) and is more likely to be unemployed and poor (8% adult unemployment compared to 5% for the general population). As a result of the urbanization of several Aboriginals, the Greater Toronto Area has had a 30% increase in population since 2000 and is now the fourth largest in Canada.

Aboriginals continue to face obstacles, including racial discrimination, band government concerns, and stereotyping, as well as limited or unavailable financing, inability to use land or material commodities as collateral, prohibitive rules, and insufficient business skills development. A microfinance strategy for the Aboriginal community in the Greater Toronto Area appeared to be an essential objective after considering the complex obstacles and growing belief in the value of microfinance with regard to the improvement of people's livelihoods and economic development of communities.

Typically, a microfinance plan designed to assist businesses is tied to underdeveloped nations where a large proportion of the population struggles to meet their basic needs for food, shelter, medical care, and education (Heck et al. 218). Aboriginal communities in Canada face the same difficulties and destitution as their counterparts in developing nations.

Aboriginal entrepreneurs have a greater need for the opportunity to run a successful firm than for money to be placed in their bank accounts. Reducing the socioeconomic gap between the non-Aboriginal and Aboriginal populations is indicative of success. It is estimated that Aboriginal firms have generated over 61,000 full-time and almost 14,000 part-time employment possibilities for the Canadian people. Contrary to poor groups in less developed nations, however, the availability of capital is a significant barrier for Aboriginal entrepreneurs in Canada, particularly in metropolitan areas (Leroux 15).

Miziwe Biik Employment and Training provides programs and services that enhance training and employment possibilities for Toronto's indigenous community. This requires extensive affiliations and partnerships with other organizations, employers, governments, and educational institutions. Miziwe Biik Development Corporation's employment and training program consists of three primary segments: the Aboriginal Business Resource Center, the housing plan, and the arts and entrepreneurial industries.

Miziwe Biik was initially intended to provide general explanations of the social economy and its significance in the commercial sector. It must be emphasized that people cannot stop enhancing their skills, introducing new activities, and reviewing the outcomes already obtained. Polanyi's study provides proof that "no society could exist for any length of time without an economy of some kind" (43). Profits and stakeholders should not be the sole determinants of corporate development. Environment, culture, and social relationships contribute to the development of a social economy that satisfies society's requirements and operational expenses (Hossein 2).

The microfinance program instance involving Miziwe Biik demonstrates the value of social and economic security in organizations. Based on the Miziwe Biik microloans, this study explores the organization, the role of a racialized leader, and the aspirations of marginalized people. In order to serve marginalized groups locally and acknowledge their social and financial needs, social economy organizations reduce the socioeconomic gap, enhance Aboriginal identification, and harmonize interpersonal ties under the leadership of a person of color.

Miziwe Biik was the first microloan program of its sort to cater to the financial needs of urban Aboriginal businessmen. Individual loans provided by Miziwe Biik (excluding group credits) range from $1,000 to $5,000 at 2% above prime. The loan payback schedule consists of twelve equal monthly payments. Numerous facets of the Miziwe Biik microloan plan demonstrate its departure from conventional lending practices.

In the fixed-amount repayment options, the emphasis on outcomes as opposed to profitability is a crucial element. This has the advantage of making consumers aware of the monthly payments required and the fixed period. Although the group earns a few hundred dollars every loan, it is not primarily motivated by profit. The group considers how each business fits within the Aboriginal community and how it improves the lives of individuals, mostly entrepreneurs. Nonetheless, the group aspires to contribute to the economic advancement of all aspects of the Aboriginal community.

Miziwe Biik identifies the formation of social bonds and the enhancement of the community's economic operations as being of equal importance to its profit-seeking goals. Additionally, the organization's application process is more collaborative than that of conventional lending institutions, resulting in a greater degree of accessibility for marginalized individuals, mostly Aboriginal entrepreneurs (Leroux 19). What is significant to Miziwe Biik extends beyond successful applicants. Improving the competence and knowledge of individuals is essential. Similar to other Canadian loan agencies and initiatives, the Miziwe Biik strategy emphasizes training and skill development.

Understanding the nature of Miziwe Biik as a social economy organization and its role in raising the living conditions of marginalized people is one of the paper's main themes. The Miziwe Biik Aboriginal Job and Training Center is a non-profit organization whose mission is to meet training and employment requirements (Foster et al. 75). One of the accomplishments for analysis was the formation of a microfinance program "in response to the need for financial inclusion of marginalized populations" (Foster et al. 76).

Complex social and economic concerns must be determined by the value of shared responsibility and collaboration in the public, private, and voluntary sectors in the discourse of modern government (Laforest 13). The selected social economy organization clearly demonstrates that Native Americans serve as representatives of marginalized populations. Approximately fifty percent of the population remains poorly educated, resulting in growing poverty, unemployment, and urbanization (Foster et al. 77). A social economy organization identifies and integrates all of these issues into a single business model.

The identification of how the social economy effects a non-profit organization and all of its stakeholders is an additional significant subargument of the project. Quarter et al. ("Understanding the Social Economy" 4) defined the social economy as a concept having common social goals of an organization centered on its purpose and practice and its economic aims or value through the given services. It is assumed that a fully developed business will meet both business and social requirements. In the twenty-first century, social activities encompass government, religion, science, technology, the family, and the law (Granovetter 136; Rostow 4).

Moreover, the governmental policy is typically linked to indigenous entrepreneurship. Therefore, it is impossible to disregard the assimilation of traditions, values, and civilizations (Henderson 242). The analysis of a social economy organization should center on its capacity to increase human capital while respecting cultural heritage, social support, and traditional values. If society and the government do not debate marginalized communities' issues locally or internationally, marginalized communities will be unable to address their issues.

What effect does Miziwe Biik have on the living conditions of marginalized people? How do the organization's programs impact the Toronto Aboriginal community? Does Miziwe Biik accomplish its mission? More than $44,000 in loans have been provided to Aboriginal entrepreneurs in fields such as health and wellness, food industry, consulting, and the arts since the program's inception. Within two years, more than $25,000, including interest, was repaid, representing a financial success rate of about 50%. After repaying their debts, some borrowers have been able to earn a stable living wage and become independent (Leroux 24). Utilizing the special Aboriginal perspective of the company, researchers have achieved overall success.

It has been demonstrated that Miziwe Biik's programs assist marginalized individuals in comprehending their unique requirements and issues, while focusing on collective and developmental goals. In addition, Miziwe Biik focuses on the resources required for success beyond the original microloan, such as access to additional money, the development of business skills such as human resources, marketing, accounting, and economics, and assistance for families and the entire community.

Within the context of equilibrium and interrelationships, loan applicants build a feeling of equilibrium between the startup needs of their enterprises and other financial strains in their everyday lives (Amin 26). In addition, the approach has proved effective even for individuals who lack confidence in and feel isolated from mainstream practices. There is a common unwillingness to alter the status quo (Quarter et al., "Case Studies for Social" 14, p. 14). Lending organizations inside a nation do not sufficiently serve the marginalized population. Members of the Aboriginal people are therefore cautious to seek loans from large financial institutions.

Loan holders emphasize the importance of infusing broader cultural components into the microlending activity, which is not typical of conventional corporate efforts. The goal of the Miziwe Biik microloan program is to increase a person's sense of self-worth, financial independence, and trust by developing a credit rating where a large number of people express increased sentiments of affiliation with the Aboriginal population and their roots.

The plan may still be reinforced through entrepreneurship, for instance, by enhanced support from the wider Aboriginal community and its establishments. Additionally, the repayment rate should be increased to approximately 100 percent. However, for numerous disenfranchised persons, the impact extends beyond the numbers. Numerous employees attest that the group has made a good contribution (Leroux 34). Numerous entrepreneurs assert unequivocally that, if not for Miziwe Biik's initiatives, they likely would not have started their enterprises.

The organization's future is uncertain due to difficulties such as staff turnover, conflict between personnel and racialized individuals, and the need for increased support from Toronto's Aboriginal population. Human capital and respect for cultural background are two variables that come into conflict with one another to create potential issues such as higher turnover, racial prejudice, and poverty among marginalized individuals. However, it appears that if Miziwe Biik's success continues on its current trajectory, it will have a lasting impact on the underprivileged population.

Internal and external variables influence the organization and quality of work. One of these elements is ethnicity, which is defined as group identity or "a profoundly extended form of kinship" (Chua 14). When a racialized person or a person of color leads an organization, the social economy may impose extra requirements and expectations.

The interests of one group (similar to the color of the leader) can take precedence over those of other delegates. In their study, Hossain and Sengupta assessed the BRAC model as one example of hierarchical connections between people of different cultural and racial backgrounds and demonstrated the existence of distinctions between people of color in business (36). The principles of social economics cannot be disregarded, but it is also vital to utilize available resources and strengthen the situations of underprivileged individuals.

The significance of leadership in the formation of a social economy organization is a central topic of discussion. In the case study, ethnicity and race were introduced in an appropriate manner. The writers emphasized that the increase in Aboriginal identification is attributable to a revival of ethnic pride (Forster et al. 78). Defined was the objective of reducing the socioeconomic gap between Aboriginals and non-Aboriginals, and the establishment of a non-profit Aboriginal-oriented business was the cause for such accomplishments. A leader of color cannot ignore his or her duty to provide equal opportunity for all employees and customers.

In addition, the presence of the social economy element presupposes the need to support a certain group and improve its physical, social, and economic requirements. Understanding criteria such as sustainability and staff retention is crucial for the development of efficient and socially just enterprises.

Despite the existing benefits of Miziwe Biik's social economy structure, the examination reveals a number of difficulties. In the workplace, minority groups confront issues such as low self-esteem and physical, chemical, or emotional abuse (Forster et al. 78). There will always be those barred from social, economic, and cultural life for various reasons. These individuals must participate in internalized local economies to combat social and economic isolation in order to earn a living (Hossein 2).

In the Miziwe Biik program, marginalized people's interests are emphasized because many Aboriginal groups in Canada must demonstrate their rights and possibilities in a continuously evolving corporate sector. Due to religious factors, racial divisions, and cultural origins, tensions may arise. In this study, the value of the Miziwe Biik initiative is emphasized since it gives more opportunities for individuals to acquire the essential training and skills for employment.

Organizations in the social economy are analyzed primarily based on their defining characteristics. Four characteristics are taken into account: social objectives, ownership, volunteering, and civic involvement (Quarter et al., "Understanding the Social Economy," 12, p. 12). Due to socially equal missions, the opportunity to reach underrepresented people presents leaders with an excellent chance to eliminate biases and increase responsibilities. On the other side, the presence of a person of color in a leadership position within an organization may generate more prejudices and worries regarding the treatment of other groups and the appraisal of their job quality.

Housing and loan programs for the oppressed should be administered by Aboriginal groups such as Miziwe Biik, adhering to the principles of appropriate accountability, absolute openness, and administrative efficiency. This allows the setting to depart from a critical path and

Zara Customer Analysis And Strategy Buy Essay Help

Table of Contents
Introduction Zara customer service Personalization of service to customers prompt resolution of consumer complaints Zara's customer care training is based on a familiar experience model. Conclusion regarding the usability of Zara's website Works Cited

Introduction

In the 21st century, the global fast fashion business has experienced extraordinary expansion. Consequently, the market has grown extremely competitive. Mango, Hennes & Mauritz, and Zara are a few of the well-known international industry giants. Historically, industry participants concentrated primarily on operations, production management, and process improvement. As an industry leader, Zara specializes on providing a variety of fast fashion products, including footwear and clothes. The company is recognized for its innovative product launches.

The product development cycle at Zara is believed to be 14 days, which is significantly shorter than the industry average of six months. This strategy has allowed the company to introduce around 10,000 unique designs annually. This demonstrates that Zara has embraced a product-centric strategy. However, the intensification of industrial competitiveness has enhanced the importance of customer service management (Choi 130). Choi identifies product customization, personal selling, repair, refund, or exchange, gift-wrapping, and the availability of a choice of payment ways as key features of customer care (130). This study provides a critical examination of Zara's customer service. The objective is to determine where the company has excelled and how it may enhance its approach to customer service.

Zara customer service

Zara's position on the international market is excellent. The corporation is placed number 58 on the list of the world's most valuable brands. The company's success is attributable to its adoption of a product-oriented strategy. The company yearly manufactures around 840 million garments. Zara has created a customer service policy in order to boost client happiness. The policy is premised on granting the consumer control over the course of interactions with the company.

Personalization of service to customers

Zara has acquired the skills necessary to provide personalized customer service. According to Lee, personalisation of customer service is a crucial aspect of a company's strategy to strengthen client loyalty (29). This argument is based on the notion that individualized customer service increases the likelihood of customers associating with a company and its products. The incorporation of an electronic customer-relationship management system [eCRM] is one of the techniques the firm has adopted to provide individualized services. Lee notes a growth in the usage of electronic technologies by online businesses to improve their customer service competitiveness (29).

In accordance with this trend, Zara has prioritized electronic channels of client communication. Recent implementation of a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology allows the company to identify and track individual products across its logistics systems. The incorporation of e-CRM technology has significantly improved Zara's pre- and post-purchase customer support capabilities. Over 75% of customers are concerned about receiving individualized post-order communications, according to a study done by E-tailing Group and MyBuy (Lee 29). Zara must ensure that it utilizes many technological methods for analyzing consumer behavior in order to improve its ability to provide individualized customer care. Consequently, the company should utilize data created by various electronic systems as a source of market knowledge.

prompt resolution of consumer complaints

In addition to the aforementioned concerns, Orsburn emphasizes the need for firms' customer service departments to swiftly address particular product complaints (79). Zara has acquired sufficient capabilities for handling client complaints. Additionally, in order to improve its customer service, the corporation has established a system that ensures all client complaints from throughout the world are forwarded to its headquarters (Levine par. 6). Thus, the organization is able to resolve client complaints from a central location. This capability should not rely just on the company's implemented customer communication system. In contrast, the company should evaluate complaints and compliments about its customer service approach posted on various internet venues, including social media platforms. The basis behind this strategy is the high rate at which social networks are increasingly utilized by consumers to propagate word-of-mouth. This strategy is crucial for helping the company to produce appropriate market intelligence, which will significantly enhance its brand image.

In 2014, the company responded to an upsurge in complaints on the branding of a children's t-shirt that appeared to promote Wild West flicks. Due to an upsurge in customer complaints, the firm issued formal apologies to the impacted consumer groups and immediately removed the t-shirts from sale in all of its online and physical locations (Arthur 3). This action demonstrates Zara's effectiveness in managing and protecting its brand reputation.

Customer service education

Zara Inc. values the contribution of providing a one-of-a-kind shopping experience for customers purchasing fast fashion items at its store. The firm has incorporated customer service training as a crucial strategy for accomplishing this objective. The goal of adopting customer service training is to improve the customer service representative's level of skills and knowledge. The result is an increase in the efficiency with which customer service agents use client-centric strategies when assisting customers.

Despite this strategy, Zara's customer care training lacks a cultural perspective. There are allegations of racial discrimination at Zara stores, according to the available secondary data. One of the noteworthy cases involves charges of discrimination against black customers and employees. A 2015 investigation by the Center for Popular Democracy confirms that Zara has used a'special order' customer service designation. The code is used to indicate orders placed by black clients (Chapin par. 2). Thus, personnel are instructed to monitor consumer conduct within the business in an effort to reduce instances of stealing. This implies the occurrence of racial profiling in the store, in which black consumers are linked to shoplifting.

The incorporation of the'special orders' connotation may result in racial bias among service consumers. This element demonstrates that Zara's customer care training program is deficient. Existence of biased customer service may result in poor customer experiences among African and African American customers. Consequently, if the company does not make the appropriate adjustments, its customer base could experience a considerable reduction.

To prevent similar instances, Zara should incorporate the principle of equity and equality into their customer service training. This objective can be attained by developing a cross-cultural training program. The company should recognize that cultural variations are a source of strength in customer service. This strategy will ensure that employees comprehend the significance of serving all clients equally, regardless of their demographic features and cultural variances. By implementing these modifications to its customer service training, Zara, Inc. will be able to institutionalize a customer-centric approach to its customer care delivery.

Zara accustomed experience blueprint

Customer experience is essential to the long-term viability of a business. However, the science and art underpinning customer experience provision are murky. Arthur asserts that providing exceptional customer service has remained a challenge for many businesses (3). However, firms must make the required measures to enhance their customer experience delivery effectiveness. Failure to enhance the customer experience results in negative outcomes such as customer dissatisfaction, lost income possibilities, legal expenses in the form of fines, and brand harm (Arthur 1).

Organizations must build a customer experience blueprint in order to prevent such incidents. The purpose of the customer experience blueprint should serve as the foundation for future customer experience design. Zara has created a detailed customer service strategy. The customer service blueprint consists of numerous components. The first element the organization has prioritized is physical evidence. The company has accomplished this objective by ensuring that its brick-and-mortar and mobile outlets are strategically positioned. The organization is committed to enhancing the quality of customer service by implementing online platforms. This action has increased the ease with which consumers can reach the company and its products. In addition to the aforementioned factors, Zara's approach to customer experience is strengthened by the use of excellent interior designs. The majority of clients that visit the store love the store's atmosphere. For instance, the company has ensured that the storefronts are furnished with aesthetically pleasing hues. Customers thus spend a considerable amount of time shopping within the business.

The company has introduced customer service training to enhance service delivery. The training has significantly increased the degree of comprehension of the essential concerns that customer service employees of the company should adhere to when engaging with and serving consumers. One of the difficulties that the organization has prioritized in the shopping process is providing clients with independence during the buying process. In addition, customer service employees must treat consumers with respect and courtesy. In addition, customer service representatives are always available to assist consumers during the purchasing process. This indicates that Zara has taken an active role in the purchasing process of its customers. Levine underlines that the interaction a customer service person develops with clients determines their perception of the company and, consequently, their likelihood of engaging in repeat purchase habits (par. 5).

Zara has implemented further onstage technology into their customer service strategy. This objective was accomplished by implementing several technologies, such as RFID. The implementation of this technology has significantly increased the efficiency with which the company provides customer service. Using this technology, Zara has improved the efficiency with which clients may use the technology to inquire in real time about the availability of a particular product in the company's physical and online stores, namely Zara.com. One may therefore argue that the method has increased the efficiency with which a company inventories or restocks a certain product at a given outlet. Thus, the technology facilitates the firm's distribution process monitoring. Therefore, technology has made Zara's customer service effortless.

The result is an enhancement in customer service, which contributes to the firm's effectiveness in providing clients with a distinctive experience.

Zara has used efficient backstage interaction crew operations to offer a distinctive consumer experience. This objective has been accomplished through integrating information and communication technologies. This feature demonstrates Zara's commitment to customer communication. Order confirmation and tracking is one of the areas in which the organization has performed exceptionally well. Some of the clients with whom I've dealt confirmed that Zara confirms the receipt of a purchase order via email and text message. In addition, the company maintains communication with customers during the entire purchasing procedure. The objective of communication is to reassure the consumer that their order will be delivered within a predetermined timeframe. However, the organization offers clients the option to alter the delivery window.

The company's customer service communication has reached a new level. Customers expressed delight with Zara's choice to allow them to trace the location of their purchases along the delivery chain. The company has accomplished this by providing clients with a URL to use. According to one of the clients, the link is hosted on Aramex.com. Constant communication between Zara and its customers throughout the order fulfillment process has played a significant impact in reducing customer support interactions. Moreover, the continual contact demonstrates Zara's ability to anticipate and meet customer wants. Moreover, the implementation of these activities has significantly contributed to the creation of a favorable consumer perception.

The organization is additionally committed to generating a distinctive customer experience by ensuring the product is delivered quickly and efficiently. To achieve this objective, Zara has enlisted the services of courier companies. The objective is to ensure that clients receive their requested products within the allotted timeframe. DPD Group is an example of a courier company with whom the company has contracted throughout Europe.

Assessing the usability of the Zara website

The incorporation of Zara has acknowledged the significance of web-based technology to providing clients with a distinctive experience. Consequently, the company has created an official website for communicating with clients. Zara has emphasized the concept of usability in the development of its website in order to increase the amount of connection with its customers. The majority of clients I spoke with believed that Zara's website is one of the most effective e-commerce sites. They mentioned other online features, including a well-designed search box. The search box is optimally positioned on the website by being placed apart from other text boxes, and its location does not alter. When a consumer does a search using the search box, all other website information vanishes, allowing them to view the search results along with the product image without being interrupted by other content.

Additionally, the website gives consumers with autosuggestions based on frequently searched abbreviations and phrases. Additionally, the search results can be filtered by product category. Therefore, clients may simply discover the item category for which they are looking. The company has also assured that Internet-enabled mobile devices such as mobile phones can be used to visit the website. This action has enabled customers to establish and sustain communication with the company via mobile devices. However, one of the website's drawbacks is that it does not allow customers to search for products based on different product attributes such as price and color.

Conclusion

Customer service is a crucial aspect of an organization's effort to attain long-term financial success. The purpose of integrating customer service is to create a one-of-a-kind experience. Zara has achieved excellence in a variety of services and operational competencies. Personalization of customer service and prompt resolution of client complaints are a couple of the areas in which the company has established expertise. This objective was attained by integrating effective and efficient information and communication technologies, such as RFID. In addition, the firm has created an efficient and user-friendly website, which helps to the enhancement of customer service. A comprehensive customer service blueprint further improves the firm's approach to customer service. The customer service blueprint aims to maintain the company's effectiveness in providing enduring customer service.

Zara has failed to recognize the significance of culture in its customer service training, despite its dedication to the adoption of technology in providing a distinctive consumer experience. The increasing number of accusations concerning racial discrimination against black clients illustrates this issue nicely. Therefore, the company has an obligation to incorporate cross-cultural considerations into its customer service training. The incorporation of cross-cultural training will play a crucial role in ensuring that all consumers are treated fairly.

Sources Cited

Developing a consumer experience, by Arthur Little and David Little, 2009. PDF file. Web.

Chapin, Adele. Zara allegedly utilized a code phrase to profile black customers in 2015. Web.

Choi, Tsan-Ming. Fast fashion systems: ideas and applications. New York: CRC Press, 2013.

Trends in e-business, e-services, and e-commerce; technological impact on commodities, services, and commercial transactions, Business Science References, Hershey, 2014. Print.

Levine, Staurt. How Zara elevated consumer focus in 2013. Web.

Orsburn, Eve. The social media business equation: leveraging online connections to increase revenue. 2012, Boston: Cengage Learning. Print.

[supanova question]

United Arab Emirates: Economics And Development Buy Essay Help

Previous and current UAE history and political structure

Originally, the United Arab Emirates consisted of tribal sheikhdoms that thrived around the Persian Gulf. The country's western boundary is the Gulf of Oman. In 1835, following the signing of a pact with the sheikhs, a solution was found to the long-standing problem of the region's residents harassing foreign ships that passed through the Gulf. The pact with the United Kingdom gave the United Kingdom power over the several emirates. Until 1971, when the states attained independence from the United Kingdom, the emirates operated autonomously according to an Arabic type of monarchy.

After the British withdrawal in 1971, the Trucial states founded the federation that is currently the United Arab Emirates. Notable is the fact that Bahrain and Oman did not join the other emirates and instead maintained their independence. The current form of government is federal, with a president and vice president. However, hereditary control is still prevalent, particularly in municipal administrations that operate under federal governance. While the political system retains its historic structure, the sheikhs contribute to the modernisation of their own nations while remaining accessible to the people.

The economic standing of every emirate.

Abu Dhabi is the largest and arguably the wealthiest of the United Arab Emirates. This emirate's economic dominance is attributable to the abundance of natural resources in this region. In 2007, over 60% of the nation's gross domestic product was contributed by the petroleum industry. However, other areas of the nation are also witnessing rapid expansion. The construction of high-quality hotels has enhanced the financial output of the tourism industry (King, 2008). In 2006, the estimated GDP was over $100 billion, a significant increase from 2004's $40 billion. At one point, the per capita income reached $70,000, placing it third in the world in terms of per capita income levels. Abu Dhabi is not only the wealthiest city in the United Arab Emirates, but also one of the richest in the world.

Dubai Dubai, unlike Abu Dhabi, whose economy is mostly dependent on oil, is also a business metropolis. Dubai's expenditures on luxurious hotels and paved roads attract entrepreneurs from around the globe. Additionally, there are notably available jobs in Dubai. As a result of the presence of numerous firms in the region, the job market is notably optimistic. The companies have a strong desire to hire the most talented employees from all around the world.

In recent years, the real estate market has faced crises that have been passed to other industries, which have also experienced rapid expansion. The repercussions of this crisis have also been felt by banks and foreign investors, who have been concerned about rising unemployment. Despite these difficulties, there is a glimmer of light, as wealthy Abu Dhabi has given Dubai a loan to save the situation (Federal Research Division, 2004).

Sharjah, the other U.A.E. state, has likewise benefited from the country's expansion. The emirate has undergone significant expansion in recent years, particularly in the industrial sector. Notable is the fact that the emirate's GDP has increased by 9-10% since 2001. In recent years, the manufacturing, construction, and real estate industries have all experienced robust expansion. The emirate ranks top among the other emirates in terms of industry. As the number of tourists has expanded over time, tourism's contribution to the GDP has also increased. In recent decades, the average annual GDP growth rate has exceeded 11%. The Ajman chamber of commerce also notes that Ajman contributed approximately 1.25 percent of the UAE's overall GDP in 2006. The small size of Ajman has also benefited them, as individual growth may be felt in various economic sectors (King, 2008).

In recent years, Fujairah emirate has seen remarkable economic expansion. This achievement is attributable to the free trade zone policy introduced roughly ten years ago. As a result, commercial activity has blossomed as numerous companies have taken the initiative to invest in this region, particularly the free zone. Various engineering, communication, trading, and manufacturing organizations have invested in the region. Additionally, the emirate features a multipurpose port that is made possible by the Gulf. In addition to cargo services, containers are handled in this region, and the port is particularly ranked third in the world in terms of bunkering.

The emirate's tourism economy is also thriving due to its wonderful beaches, oasis, year-round weather, and archaeological monuments. In the past five years, Ras al-Khaimah has experienced significant economic growth. These developments are mostly attributable to the government's sound policies, structural changes, and government investments. Ras al-Khaimah has experienced a cumulative growth rate of 50% since 2003. In response, the emirate has begun providing its residents with high-quality public services. Ras al-Khaimah is also renowned for its competitive industrial sector, particularly in the ceramic and cement industries, to name a few. Tourism and real estate have also played a significant role in the country's economic development (King, 2008).

Due to its foreign n and local currency sovereignty, the emirate has received an A rating from two reputable international credit rating organizations. Umm Al Quwain has experienced significant economic and technological growth in the 21st century. In fact, it is one of the most rapidly expanding emirates in the country. As the government has taken the initiative to explore the available economic resources, the tourism sector has been the primary contributor to the development that has occurred. The emirate has a coastline that emphasizes the peninsula as well as a sand island, which promotes the tourism business. Old harbor Dreamland Aqua Park and Al Dour are two additional tourist destinations.

The manner in which the UAE managed its economy and the type of economic policies it used.

Prior to the discovery of oil in their location, the majority of people in the United Arab Emirates were pearl divers and merchants, which contributed to their rise. The abrupt discovery of oil caused instability in the region, but the United Kingdom was there to maintain political stability and regulate the war. The UAE's emergence as an economic superpower can be traced to government policy. The government was essential in establishing a program of economic diversification and also created a policy of openness. In turn, the government has been able to improve other economic sectors, particularly the industrial and tourism industries. The country's GDP has increased as a result, and it is now the second largest Arab economy.

The banking sector has had enormous growth in recent years, with an estimated growth rate of 30% over the past five years, as a result of the country's economic expansion. This has increased the number of bank branches in the region to approximately 650 nationwide. The ratio of the number of banks to the population in the region has become one of the highest in the region. Since there are a large number of Muslims in the region, the banking industry has adopted an Islam division, with some of them adopting an Islamic banking system (Wilson, 2011).

As mentioned previously, the tourism industry has been heavily encouraged throughout the region. Significant investment has been made in the tourism industry. The success of this industry is attributable to both the region's geography and climate. The nation boasts beautiful beaches. All year long, the location is bathed in sunshine, making it attractive to tourists. The government has responded by constructing hotels, making the region an ideal tourist destination.

Numerous businesses in UAE, including banking, tourism, sport, education strength, and the expansion in the number of institutions, are thriving.

The fact that the majority of the country is a desert has a bearing on the sports that are played there. Camel racing is a common activity that typically takes place during the winter months. Dubai has even hosted the international horse racing world cup, demonstrating the region's affinity for horse racing. PGA championship courses have even been built in the region, which has seen an increase in golf. Rugby is also gaining popularity in the UAE as the six nations rugby sevens event continues to be staged in Dubai. In terms of expansion, the education sector has likewise followed suit.

The emphasis has switched to higher education, where American universities have created branches in Dubai to provide career-oriented education of world-class quality. The United Arab Emirates have a liberal economy that endorses free trade zones. There are no restrictions on profit transfer and capital repatriation by the government. In the free zone areas, there are no import tariffs on foodstuffs and imports imported for use in the free zone areas. Corporation tax and personal taxes are also absent, resulting in very competitive labor costs (Scott, 2011).

How Dubai boosted the economy of the UAE, where the UAE was in 1971, and where it is today.

Dubai contributes the most to this country out of the seven emirates that comprise the United Arab Emirates. First, it is the principal commercial center of the region, as it attracts several international investors. The existence of a free port encourages commercial activity in the region, which in turn stimulates economic growth. Dubai's tourism is also greater than that of the other emirates, and it contributes a greater proportion of GDP. The fact that so many individuals also travel to Dubai boosts economic activity in the region.

Since the country's establishment in 1971, the UAE's economy is believed to have multiplied by approximately 140. In 1971, the country's GDP was projected to be Dh6.5 million, and by 2009, it had increased to over Dh914.5 billion. In addition, the oil industry has expanded enormously since the country's founding (staff, 2010). Notable also is the fact that the country has become the second largest economy in Asia as a result of the government's diversification policy, which aims to boost other sectors.

Future scenario for the UAE as a nation

UAE is becoming an increasingly popular tourist destination, and this trend is set to continue as the government continues to prioritize the improvement of tourist-friendly infrastructure. Regarding the oil sector, it is considered that there is a possibility of a decline in oil in the region. Therefore, the GDP is expected to decline by a certain proportion that the growing tourism and commercial sectors cannot offset. Dubai is still projected to be the largest contributor to the GDP, notwithstanding its current economic difficulties. This is owing to the fact that Dubai gets more visitors than any of the other seven emirates.

Conclusion

The economy of the United Arab Emirates has grown substantially throughout the years. It is notable that the area's black gold was initially responsible for the rise. The government, however, has adopted a policy of diversification in light of the possibility that this product may become extinct in the future. The policy seeks to improve the other areas of the economy that were struggling at the time. The tourist industry is one of these industries. It has grown enormously, and the region receives a large number of tourists annually. Consequently, the economy has strengthened substantially, and some industries, such as the financial sector, have also profited.

References

Basit, S. a. ( 2011, April 7). Tourism is at the core of UAQ's growth strategy. Web.

Government Research Division (2004). Emirates Arabes Unis: A Country Study Washington, District of Columbia: Kessinger Publishing,.

King, D. C. (2008). United Arab Emirates: Marshall Cavendish, New York.

Scott, I. (2011). Dubai update. Web.

crew, E. (2010). The UAE economy multiplies by 140. Web.

R. Wilson (2011). The development of islamic finance GCC. Web.

[supanova question]

Business Intelligence: Fundamental Concepts And Principles Buy Essay Help

Introduction

This article discusses the United States energy industry (US). It is broken into two sections, section one (I) and section two (II). Part I examines the topic by examining the structure of the US energy business and how the industry may be formed in the future. It also examines the energy industry's importance to the U.S. economy. In addition, the business model of Conocophillips is analyzed in light of the United States' energy sustainability objective. The US energy business is argued to have a multiproduct structure that is mostly influenced by economies of scope. In these economies of scale, petroleum, coal, and natural gas have persisted. It is also asserted that the energy business plays a crucial part in bolstering the U.S. economy.

The second section is a personal reflection on the subjects covered thus far in the course. Topics include competitiveness, strategic planning, and stakeholder analysis, among others. The study utilizes a variety of scholarly sources and data to support its arguments.

Part I: Business Report

Context of the Energy Industry in the United States

When the United States achieved freedom in 1789, it had abundant native forests that were removed for agricultural purposes. At that period, firewood was the primary source of energy. The explanation is because there were no other energy sources in that region. The country's economy was quite modest relative to other economies at the time. The economy was likewise characterized by sluggish growth, particularly due to its reliance on firewood as the primary energy source.

Therefore, the U.S. economy consisted solely of subsistence activities. In 1835, however, the industrialization wave reached the United States and transformed its economy from subsistence to industrial. Due to its incapacity to support a variety of industrial activity, firewood energy became irrelevant. As a replacement for firewood, the United States began using coal as its principal energy source. The use of coal led to an expansion in urbanization and an improvement in the nation's transportation infrastructure. For example, there was the advent of trains that relied solely on coal energy. The US economy began to grow exponentially due to its dependence on coal and has continued to do so to the present day.

As the nation had abundant coal deposits, it began exporting coal to other nations. Coal was the dominant source of energy in the United States for decades due to the quantity of coal reserves and lack of alternate energy sources. During the 1950s, however, petroleum and natural gas became the dominant energy sources in the United States. The introduction of automobiles, the majority of which could not utilize coal energy, prompted the acceptance of petroleum as one of the key energy sources. Additionally, petroleum was capable of producing kerosene, which was utilized for domestic uses such as cooking and lighting. Petroleum and natural gas were also utilized extensively in businesses that had previously relied on coal.

The United States currently uses a variety of energy sources, including oil, natural gas, coal, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, and renewable sources such as geothermal, wind, solar, and waste energy. As was previously said, the US economy has developed exponentially for many years. In terms of Gross Domestic Product, the United States is currently the world's largest economy (GDP). It is also the second greatest consumer of global energy, using 26% of global energy while producing only 5% of global energy. This mismatch between production and consumption has been criticized by economic analysts, who contend that since the United States is one of the world's largest consumers of energy, it should play a leading role in the management of greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.

This critique has led to the expansion of international law to include environmental protection. Consequently, numerous accords addressing climate change have been ratified. The United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), the Kyoto Protocol on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification, and the Copenhagen Treaty are examples of such agreements (Deke 2008).

However, critics of the United States have maintained that there are double standards when it comes to honoring the climate change treaty accords. The United States has refused to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions in accordance with international commitments. Additionally, it has declined to expand its commitment to climate change mitigation efforts (Deke 2008). However, according to Bill Gates, a member of the American energy innovation council, the United States is dedicated to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% in the coming decades (Schwartz 2015).

In recent decades, the United States has been afflicted by energy crises that have also affected other nations. The primary concern facing the US energy industry is the depletion of coal reserves. As a result, the United States imports energy from foreign nations, particularly Saudi Arabia. However, the U.S. government is not pleased with the scenario, as reliance on imported energy is expected to impair the country's worldwide competitiveness (Department of Homeland Security: energy sector 2014).

Identification and Description of the Industry's Structure

As stated previously, the United States has a multiproduct energy industry structure. This structure is characterized by the manufacture of multiple similar items by a small number of large corporations (Allanson & Montagna 2005). The 2012 industry structure in terms of energy products is shown in the table below.

Type of energy Proportion Consumption by industry share

Petroleum 37 Transport 28

Natural gas 24 Business 20

Commercial and residential coal 23

Renewable energy 7 Production of electrical energy 40

Atomic power 8 – –

It is evident from the table that the United States has a diversity of energy sources. These developments have diversified the market and enabled individuals and businesses to choose their preferred form of energy based on availability, cost, and sustainability (Solomon & Luzadis 2008).

Motives for the Design

As indicated in the above table, the United States has numerous energy sources. Consequently, it implies that enterprises in the industry produce multiple types of energy simultaneously. The structure of many products is founded on the economic theory of economies of scope. The notion is founded on the economic principle that manufacturing costs vary inversely with product variety. In other words, when a company produces multiple products, its production costs are cheaper than when it produces only one (The economist: economies of scale and scope 2015).

Multiproduct structure is identical with oligopoly in economics. Oligopoly is a market structure in which a few large enterprises dominate a given market. Typically, the companies are familiar with one another, and they split the market proportionally. Additionally, oligopoly is characterized by cutthroat competition. It indicates that firms in an oligopoly industry typically compete for customers in distinctive ways. Differentiation and positioning are a means through which businesses compete.

In the realm of strategic management, differentiation refers to the process of generating client demand for a product or service. It is accomplished by describing the distinctive qualities of the product or service being distinguished. The purpose of differentiation is to establish a market niche for a specific product or service. When clients are made aware of the distinctive characteristics of various products and services, they are able to make well-informed selections about those items and services. Differentiation, if executed effectively, enables clients to purchase specific items or services in a market saturated with several product types (Thompson & Martin 2010).

Positioning is the process of establishing the identity of a company in the minds of consumers through the use of numerous techniques such as advertising, distribution of products or services, and the manufacturing of distinctive, low-priced goods (Armstrong & Kotler 2009). Positioning tries to stabilize and retain the positions of a company's differentiated products in order to preserve the company's competitive advantage in relation to those items (Ferrell & Hartline 2010).

Oligopoly can sometimes result in the development of corporate cartels. When corporations agree to raise the prices of their goods beyond the reach of the majority of consumers, cartels are created. The corporations may also opt to decrease the supply of certain goods so that the demand for such goods increases, causing the prices to rise.

How Organizational Structure Impacts Strategic Decisions

The multiproduct nature of the U.S. energy market has caused many companies to diversify their operations. Due to the risk of losing competition, it is difficult to identify businesses that specialize in one sort of energy product. Numerous businesses have diversified their holdings and created operations abroad. Some have created additional innovative tactics. Rather than dealing with several energy products in a single country, for instance, some companies have opted to deal with a single energy product in that country, based on the demand for that energy product in that country.

Discussion of the Potential Future Industry Structure

It is likely that the energy business will transition from an oligopoly to a monopoly. Monopoly describes a scenario in which a single company dominates a given market. Typically, the corporation with a monopoly sets the pricing of goods and services by influencing the supply of those items (Vashisht 2005). Monopolies are frequently related with consumer exploitation due to the lack of options for consumers. Governments can interfere and push monopolies to cut the pricing of their goods and services, therefore monopolies may not always abuse consumers (McEachern 2011).

The pricing strategy of a monopoly is independent of that of its competitors. The market-dominant firm sets pricing without discrimination and is typically free to charge varying prices to different clients for the same commodity or service, based on their ability and willingness to pay (McEachern 2011).

In a monopolistically structured industry, other small enterprises are referred to as price takers. Due to the dominance of the dominant player, they are unable to affect the prices of goods and services. As a result, they base their pricing decisions on the prices set by the market leader. Those who vary from the price established by the dominant player must close their company (Charyulu 2011).

Numerous monopolies are characterized by entrance restrictions (Blythe 2006). These obstacles include cost, marketing, and branding. Therefore, for new entrants to enter a dominant industry, enormous capital is required. In order to acquire a portion of the clients, they must also make substantial investments in marketing. The reason for this is that dominant enterprises invest much in branding, making it harder for new competitors to attract clients for their products or services (McEachern 2011).

It is vital to note that U.S. coal reserves are rapidly depleting whereas natural gas reserves have not yet been depleted. Therefore, over the next few decades, enterprises specializing in the production of energy from coal would cease to exist (Electricity markets and policy group: Current size and remaining market potential of the U.S. energy service company industry 2013).

In contrast, corporations specializing in the exploration and production of natural gas would dominate the US energy industry. In addition, the US government is engaged in a global drive to increase the use of natural gas as the primary energy source. Few countries in the world utilize natural gas as their primary energy source. The United States intends to create a market for its natural gas, which would benefit its economy given its vast natural gas reserves. If the United States were to succeed in establishing a global market for natural gas, corporations specializing in the production and sale of natural gas would expand their monopolies to markets outside the United States (Electricity markets and policy group: Current size and remaining market potential of the U.S. energy service company industry 2013).

Contribution of the Energy Sector to the U.S. Economy

The United States has the greatest economy in the world based on nominal GDP. In 2012, its nominal GDP was $17 trillion, representing 22% of the world GDP. Its currency, the US dollar, is the most widely used currency in the world; as a result, its value has a significant impact on the prices of imports and exports. The United States is also a key international trade player. Japan, Germany, China, Canada, Mexico, and South Korea are among its most important trading partners (U.S department of commerce: top trading partners 2013). It is also the global leader in natural gas and oil production. The United States is the second largest manufacturing nation in the world. The US is home to the headquarters of the world's greatest corporations, including Wal-Mart, Exxon Mobil, ConocoPhillips, Chevron, and General Motors, according to Lerbinger (Lerbinger 2013).

The United States is also a favoured investment destination for many global firms. In 2013, foreign direct investment in the United States was valued at $2.3 trillion, while foreign direct investment in the United States was valued at $3 trillion (U.S. department of commerce: Archive for the 'direct investment' category, 2013). New consumerism has made the United States the greatest consumer market in the world.

As explained by Juliet, consumerism has experienced fundamental transformations that have resulted in a new form of consumerism characterized by irrational spending urges rather than addressing basic requirements. She contends that contemporary Americans are more lavish than those of the 1950s and 1960s. In those days, consumerism was characterized by peer influence at the neighborhood level, i.e., individuals used to compare themselves to their peers in their nearby areas, and as a result, purchasing was mostly oriented on necessities rather than pleasures. Even during those times, it was difficult to discover people living beyond their means, as they only coveted social standing commensurate with their money.

However, the rise of new media, globalization, cultural diversity, and the modern workplace have given consumerism a new dimension. According to Juliet, the media has had a significant part in fostering the new materialism, which is characterized by Americans' eagerness to spend beyond their means. Numerous media commercials promote the culture of buying without offering alternatives to luxury lifestyles. Most of the time, the new media promotes luxurious lifestyles that are affordable for the middle class but unattainable for those with low incomes. Americans possess